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upgrade ram


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#1 steingis

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 03:21 PM

i have a lenovo 3000 n100 it has 2x512mb of ram and can take 2x1gb upgrade
i was wondering if this would improve the speed much as somtimes it lags a fair bit and it just about crashes when playing games, its 6 years old so maybe its time to get a new one i have restored it back to factory settings and it still lags

http://www.laptopsdirect.co.uk/Lenovo_3000_N100_Dual_Core_TY04HUK/version.asp

Edited by steingis, 04 February 2013 - 03:21 PM.


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#2 diggi

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 03:55 PM

By all means upgrade the Ram but having an SSD will turn it into an entirely new machine

#3 steingis

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 06:02 PM

i see sdd 64gb on ebay for my machine at £50 does the gb matter with speed or is this just storage space? wouldnt want to invest more than that on this oldie my hard drive now is 80gb maybe thats whats creaking when it starts lagging

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/64GB-IBM-LENOVO-3000-N100-0689-H5A-N100-0689-H6A-SOLID-STATE-DRIVE-SSD-/321023697317?pt=UK_Computing_Solid_State_Drives&hash=item4abe80e1a5

Edited by steingis, 04 February 2013 - 06:03 PM.


#4 diggi

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 08:40 PM

Generally speaking larger SSD's are usually faster. BTW how much free space do u currently have? 64 gb might be too small, but then again you could make the 80gb an external storage drive
If u can get a larger one within your budget I'd do that but don't forget to increase the system ram also

#5 steingis

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 11:49 AM

storage space wouldnt be an issue as ive just wiped it and i keep all my stuff an an external hard drive.

the hard drive in my comp is 80gb and preety much nothing on the system at the mo,do you think that the 64gb ssd would make a big enough improvement on the one thas already in there?

thanks

steve

#6 diggi

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:20 PM

Yes go for it

#7 dc3

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:39 PM

SSDs are much faster than HDDs for accessing times which translates to faster access of applications. The SSD has a faster transfer rate, but not that much faster. The downside is that the SSD has a slower write speed than some HDDs. The other thing that SSDs have going for them is there are no moving parts to fail. But I still think they are way over priced, but that's my opinion.

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#8 synergy513

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:15 PM

i don't know about laptops, but i had the same problem in my desktop with my stock 2x 512mb sticks with two available upgrade sockets, much like yours, the 1 gb memory would be utilized at full capacity so i would believe "swapping" started, whereas the hdd would be accessed for additional needed memory ..which is much slower. I added 2x 1gb sticks and it is all better now. you may want to take a look at your BIOS before you add ram sticks to check for the memory enabled toggle

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#9 steingis

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:31 PM

i don't know about laptops, but i had the same problem in my desktop with my stock 2x 512mb sticks with two available upgrade sockets, much like yours, the 1 gb memory would be utilized at full capacity so i would believe "swapping" started, whereas the hdd would be accessed for additional needed memory ..which is much slower. I added 2x 1gb sticks and it is all better now. you may want to take a look at your BIOS before you add ram sticks to check for the memory enabled toggle


how do i do thAT

#10 synergy513

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 02:40 PM

first things first, all kinds of things can go wrong when adding RAM sticks. the best approach would be to look at all your specs with software tools like SIW . things like MHz, ddr_ ,  pcXXXX , physical dimensions and write these specs down as you will need them when shopping. then I would NOT recommend buying the RAM online unless you use newegg . i would recommend checking for a PC hardware retailer such as tigerdirect/CompUSA or maybe even a staples store close by so you can physically be there holding your specs in your hand while checking out the  options in front of your eyes waiting for a home. then, once you get the 2X 1 GB RAM sticks back in your home waiting for installation, get some latex gloves on your hands, or maybe even google for countermeasures against ESD (electrostatic discharge).  ESD physically damages sensitive circuits inside the RAM sticks.  then dive into your BIOS to check for RAM installation variables. then power the PC down .then physically install the RAM sticks into your available sockets.  then pray to the PC deities. power the PC back up and turn the anxiety into Tai Chi and use SIW to check that the PC BIOS recognizes the new hardware. this procedure worked for me.

 

      P.S. using Speccy clogs up PC pipelines more than you think, although it is a sweet GUI. Use SIW instead.


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#11 dc3

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 03:31 PM

first things first, all kinds of things can go wrong when adding RAM sticks. the best approach would be to look at all your specs with software tools like SIW .

 

If you use the proper module/s you shouldn't have any problems.  SIW is a nice application for finding system information, but to find out exactly what you have for RAM you should use a program like CPU-Z.  Better still, just go to a RAM manufacturer's website to find out what RAM is compatible with the computer, example:  Crucial suggest that this computer uses DDR2 PC2-5300 and has a maximum of 2GB of RAM.

 

I would NOT recommend buying the RAM online unless you use newegg

 

Newegg is a very reputable online company, but there are companies like Crucial which can match and guarantee the modules will work with the computer that it is intended for.

 

get some latex gloves on your hands

 

I worked in an industry where we dealt with ESDs on a daily basis, I was tethered to a ground via a wrist strap, wore clothing which was designed not to create static electricity, even wore ankle staps... but latex gloves ain't part of the program.  Most ESD problems can be resolved by discharging your body prior to touching anything inside the case, this can be done by touching anything metal close at hand.

 

dive into your BIOS to check for RAM installation variables

 

In almost all cases you shouldn't need to fool with the BIOS if you are using modules which are proper for the application and all have the same voltages.

 

Hope this helped. :thumbup2:


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#12 Animal

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 06:57 PM

<snip> get some latex gloves on your hands, or maybe even google for countermeasures against ESD (electrostatic discharge). <snip>

I would definitely Google how to prevent or minimize ESD. I would however NOT use latex gloves. Ever rub a balloon?

Latex is not ESD compliant. The material, when rubbed against itself, creates a triboelectric effect (also referred to as a tribo effect or triboelectic charging). This means it creates an electric charge, and makes the material unsuitable for electronics applications.

Above quote from: http://www.gsfcc.org/index.php?title=Alternatives_To_Latex

Bold in the quote above is mine.

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#13 synergy513

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 12:40 AM

thanks for the heads up. i used to watch technicians wear the wrist straps tethered  and buckled to a rubber mat on thier desks. now that i remember those technicians, i don't think i ever saw them with rubber gloves on. maybe i should have just mentioned rubber gloves instead of latex. ooops.  rubber is sometimes synonymous with latex.


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#14 dc3

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 08:55 AM

An antistatic mat is not made from rubber which can generate static electricity.  The material that antistatic mats are comprised of are a material that actually has a low resistance which allows electrostatic charges to slowly bleed off to a earth ground.  These mats need to be connected to an earth ground by means of a wire attached to the mat.  The antistatic wrist straps you see are made of the same type of material also require being earth grounded, either directly to a earth ground or to a earth grounded antistatic mat.

 

The following is an excerpt from Wikipedia.  Triboelectric effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The triboelectric effect (also known as triboelectric charging) is a type of contact electirfication in which certain materials become electrically charged after they come into contact with another different material through friction. Rubbing glass with fur, or a comb through the hair, can build up triboelectricity. Most everyday static electricity is triboelectric. Other examples of materials that can acquire a significant charge when rubbed together include glass rubbed with silk, and hard rubber rubbed with fur.


Edited by dc3, 31 March 2013 - 08:59 AM.

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