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what's the difference between office 2013 and office 365


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#1 one2treefor5

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:54 PM

OK I am curious. I am trying to understand the difference between these two: Office 2013 is just an updated version from office 2011 and its predecessor, and Office 365 is like Google docs, except that its a paid subscription. I don't see any logic to why I want to pay annually where I can just do Google docs, or just use a regular office application.

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#2 Animal

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:31 PM

Nice article with a comparison chart: Office 365 vs. Office 2013: Should you rent or own?

Only you know your personal use needs and requirements. If it's about money there are free alternatives. Renting means always the latest and greatest updated apps available. Buying means at some point antiquated and possibly no longer compatible or becoming problematic. Choose what works for you and your needs.

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#3 one2treefor5

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 03:12 PM

Thanks for the information link. So basically office 365 is a kind of a software lease. I'm just curious about it, but right now I am happy with my office 2010. No reason for me to spend something because its brand new. I mean I know some people who are still uses office 2000.

#4 Scoobaru

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:30 AM

We are running the 30 day trial at the moment but have already bought the software from Amazon.
Our main reasons for going ahead are:
1) Up to date software for all 5 of our machines.
2) Flexibility. We can use this on 5 machines but the clincher (for me) is you can download Office onto any machine for just a session and it will uninstall afterwards. So even in an Internet Cafe or a Clients machine.
3) You can activate and deactivate machines from your account. We change machines often so to not have issues with activation is a plus.
4) Compare the price vs buying Enterprise.

Overall, this package fits at a reasonable price. We picked up the 5 user Home package for 65 delivered. Equate that over the year and it's a pretty good deal compared to the Enterprise version which is the best part of 400.

#5 one2treefor5

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:52 PM

Is there any significant difference between 2010 and 2013/365, aside for asthetic reason?



#6 one2treefor5

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:51 PM

I just read an article yesterday that if I purchase 2013 and install it to my current computer, then that application is stuck there forever.  That's sucks.  What happen if my hard drive dies.



#7 1063

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:34 PM

I just read an article yesterday that if I purchase 2013 and install it to my current computer, then that application is stuck there forever.  That's sucks.  What happen if my hard drive dies.

 

It seems you get a different answer with every MS person you speak to.  At least tell people if it is the case, and, if it is true, what a poor business decision!



#8 sflatechguy

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 09:57 PM

You are correct in one sense -- Office 2013 is the latest version of the Office suite of applications, like Office 2010, 2007, 2003, etc. As for Office 365, you can scale it up or down, depending on your needs. There are home versions, professional versions and enterprise versions. The pro and enterprise versions include SharePoint (including public-facing web sites) and Exchange Online; you need to own and bring your own domains for this. This allows you to create your own company website and use your own company email addresses: ex. your.name@yourcompany.com. The enterprise versions also allow you to link your on premise Exchange mail servers to the Office 365 Exchange online. In addition, your email is accessible from any web browser, and you can use the Office web apps from any supported browser, regardless of which computer you are using.

If all you need is Office installed on one computer, Office 2013 is fine. If you want or need to access email and Office from various computers, Office 365 is the alternative way to do that.



#9 smax013

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:17 PM

I just read an article yesterday that if I purchase 2013 and install it to my current computer, then that application is stuck there forever.  That's sucks.  What happen if my hard drive dies.

 

Nope, you can transfer it to a new computer.  Directly from the Microsoft site:

 

http://blogs.office.com/b/office-news/archive/2013/03/06/office-2013-retail-license-agreement-now-transferable.aspx



#10 smax013

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:29 PM

Thanks for the information link. So basically office 365 is a kind of a software lease. I'm just curious about it, but right now I am happy with my office 2010. No reason for me to spend something because its brand new. I mean I know some people who are still uses office 2000.

 

Most people likely would be fine still using Office 2000 or even earlier.

 

In the end, I see the decision between going with Office 2013 and Office 365 as a function of how many computers you want Office on in combination with how often you update Office with a little bit of whether you want/need some of the extra stuff that Office 365 gives you.

 

If you only need Office on one or maybe two computers and/or don't always upgrade to the latest version, then going with Office 2013 is the more "cost efficient" option.  Once you go to three computers, it depends on whether you want to the latest and greatest.  If you don't need the latest and greatest, then Office 2013 might still be the more cost efficient way to go.  If you do want/need the latest and greatest, then with three computers, Office 365 starts to become the more cost efficient option.  More than three computers, then Office 365 generally is the better option.



#11 sflatechguy

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:42 PM

A few other things to consider: with Office 365, when the Office suit gets upgraded, you get the upgrade automatically. For instance, Microsoft is right now transitioning Office 365 users from Office 2010 to Office 2013. If you bought the package with the downloaded computer applications, you just download the new version. If all you are using are the web apps, you don't have to do anything.

Also, you can use Office 365 on a PC or a Mac -- and that includes the downloadable Office suite. Just download the version for your OS. So if you're running, say, four computers -- two PCs and two Macs -- and you want Office on all of them, Office 365 is probably the easiest and cheapest way to do that.

If you're only needing Office for a single PC, and you don't need SharePoint, the shrink-wrapped boxed version is probably best.






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