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Linux Shell Commands


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Ted Striker

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 09:25 PM

I've been reading Linux All-in-One For Dummies a bit lately and I've tried to install the chrome browser on my Kubuntu virtual machine but it's not working. Here's the command I used:

sudo apt-get install google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb

Here's the response I get:

Reading Package Lists...Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
E: Unable to locate package google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb
E: Couldn't find any package by regex 'google-chrome-stable_current_i386.deb'

This is after I downloaded this file from google. The book used apt-get install without the sudo command but I'm not able to get anywhere without using sudo. What am I doing wrong?

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#2 myrti

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 09:42 PM

Hi,

packages are downloaded and installed with apt-get install, however when I did not have the package in my repositories, but download them manually, I've always used dpkg -i to install the package.

I would suggest either adding the google repositories (so they exist) to your repository, then apt-get install should work. Or use dpkg -i with the package you have downloaded locally. Both will need sudo.

regards myrti

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#3 Ted Striker

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 10:37 PM

Thanks for the info. I'm not yet familiar with repositories so I'll have to read up on that but I'll try the dpkg -i command.

#4 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:05 PM

I moved this topic into the Unix/Linux forum; you might get some answers from "regular folks" here too.

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#5 Zen Seeker

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 02:01 PM

Hi,

As myrti noted you need to mix and match your tools to your packages.

a "*.deb" package is usually a Debian formated package that can be installed with; sudo dpkg -i package_name.deb

Using; sudo apt-get update
Then; sudo apt-get install chromium

If it fails due to not being able to find the proper repository go here and follow all the steps and you'll be fine; http://www.liberiangeek.net/2011/12/install-google-chrome-using-apt-get-in-ubuntu-11-10-oneiric-ocelot/?ModPagespeed=noscript

You might also want to do; sudo apt-get install synaptic
Synaptic is a GUI tool for installing packages that has a lot more information and a one stop shop for searching, installing, removing and explaining what each application does. Just remember that you need to enter the root password when prompted after launching this application as it doesn't use sudo.


Regards,
Zen




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