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Power button cable socket into the motherboard snapped off


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5 replies to this topic

#1 abimael21

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 05:25 PM

I have a Laptop TOSHIBA Satellite C655D-S5046.



The little socket where the power button cable connects to snapped off the motherboard.

I want to know if its still possible to put the little socket back into the motherboard so it could turn on properly again.

The little socket still has the two pins that were soldered to the motherboard except they are real small.

Would it be possible for me to solder those small pins back into the motherboard?
Would it work?

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#2 rotor123

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:24 PM

Hi.

What else is damaged? Anything? Was the damage caused by a drop? All the connectors on laptop cables are delicate.

I've worked on many a Toshiba and Lenovo and I've never seen that. I worked in a Toshiba and Lenovo ASP (Authorized Service Provider) shop and I just can't imagine that happening.

However Whether or not you can solder it back on? That will depend on how good you are at delicate soldering. If you have never done that sort or board level repairs I suggest you find someone in Your area that has the skills and the equipment to do the repair. If you can post pictures of the button and the Motherboard where the button goes with the location circled, Both sides, It could help. I want to see if the Motherboard is damaged where it connects.

For a repair person I would talk to a local electronics part store that sells parts to repair people for suggestions. The one near me was helpful that way.

Good Luck
Roger

Edited by rotor123, 13 January 2013 - 06:25 PM.

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#3 abimael21

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 07:18 PM

Thank you Rotor123 for your reply :)

Well what happened was that as i was trying to remove the cover to access the motherboard i accidentally pull on the power button cable and in the process i ripped off the little socket off from the motherboard. the power button cable that connects to the motherboard is really short... :(


Nothing else is damaged just that. I would solder it but since am skeptical about it i haven't.

Posted Image

The red circle is the area where the little socket used to be it still has bare contact points.
If i was to jump both with a screw driver it would turn on.


Posted Image

I know its real hard to see but this was the little socket that used to be there. it still has both metal pins that should be soldered to the motherboard.

#4 rotor123

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 09:51 PM

Hi, Was it hooked up to the two little silver rectangles within the circle?
I can not tell, the 2nd picture is too fuzzy, Does the switch connector have little flat pads sticking out beyond the plastic that would sit on those flat rectangles? Can you get a better 2nd picture?

However if the answer to both questions is Yes, then maybe you could, Do you have any soldering experience? I had three years electronics training years ago. To solder that would require a fine point low wattage soldering iron, non corrosive flux and the right solder. Probably a strong magnifying light stand to be able to see what you are doing.

I get worried when I hear a question like yours. It tells me that there is a good chance of damage to the motherboard from overheating the solder pads. Or a cold solder joint etc. To put it another way I know I could do the repair, but I'm not You. I know my skill level, and I know when to bring in the experts.

However if you want to try I'd like to see sharper pictures.

Thanks
Roger

Edited by rotor123, 13 January 2013 - 09:52 PM.

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#5 James Litten

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 12:51 PM

This is just an idea and not something that I have done.

You might try using a toothpick or dental tool to apply a tiny dab of wire glue to the posts on the socket and place it on the pads.
http://www.amazon.com/Electrically-Conductive-Wire-Glue-Bonds/dp/B000Z9H7ZW

It works fine for low voltage like that switch uses but it will not hold it in place very well. If it works, you can put a dab of epoxy on either side of the socket to hold it to the circuit board.

Let us know if you try this and how it works. I've used the wire glue for other stuff but never anything as small as this.

James

#6 dc3

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:55 PM

The danger of trying to solder these connections will be lifting a trace off of the board. At one time I was working in a printed circuit board department where macroscopic lenses were needed for the extremely small components which had to be had soldered onto the circuit board as they couldn't be soldered in the wave soldering process. One of the things that makes this a lot easier is to have liquid flux to enhance the flow of solder. You would apply a very small amount, like a very small drop on the end of a pointed toothpick, to the contact point which you will be soldering to. It will also help if you tin the wire (add solder to it) you will be attaching prior to soldering it to the contact. I would suggest setting up a mock situation where you can practice this before attempting this yourself.

A word of caution, too much flux will cause problems.

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