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#1 lebowskidd

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:08 PM

Woke up one morning with my PC frozen, and had to do a hard reset. Since then, the computer will power on but will not send a signal to to my monitor, I'm also not sure it POST since I don't hear any beeps from the computer.

I'm trying to nail down the issue, opening my case I see that:

The fan on my video card (240 gt) revs up and slows and revs up and slows.

One of the pins on CPU heatsink can't lock into the motherboard, the fan still revs 100%.

Things I've tried:

I tried a different video card, that fan ran fine yet still no signal to monitors.

Tried monitors and different cables, they worked fine on my other computer.

Tried a different power supply, still no signal to monitor.

Tried, one stick of ram at a time, then no ram.

Bought a new stick of Ram, swapped one stick out, and BAM! Display is back baby!

I left it on and alone, when I came back the computer was off.

I started it and it froze at the Windows welcome screen, hard reset, and now no display or usb port activity, have my wireless mouse and keyboard plugged in.

I tried the New ram, no luck this time.

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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 11:58 PM

Please post the make and model number of this computer or motherboard and we'll have a better chance of assisting you. :thumbup2:

Thanks in advance....


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#3 lebowskidd

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 03:24 AM

ECS G31T-M

If you take a look at this picture,
In the upper right, the piece (grey stump) that has that gold circle thing around it, next to the 4 pin power connecter is bent on my board, I wonder if that is the issue?

Posted Image

Edited by lebowskidd, 28 December 2012 - 03:27 AM.


#4 MrBruce1959

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 10:50 AM

First off that thing next to the four pin CPU power connector is what we call an RF choke. It acts like a filter to block undesired RF interference.

As long as the two ends of the copper coiled wire are soldered to the motherboard, that part is okay of it leans over a little bit.

What concerns me, is that you mentioned that one of bolts that secures your heat sink firmly against the processors heat spreader does not tighten down.

Having it this way, is causing your heat sink to make an uneven mating contact with the processor heat spreader.

This definitely will cause your processor to over heat, which is not a good thing!

I can not say for sure if your processor has over heated to the point of total destruction, but I am sure it has suffered some damage.

In the hope that we are not too late, I strongly suggest that you find a way to get that bolt doing the job it is meant to do.

If the threads are damaged on either the bolt or the hole that the bolt screws into, then I suggest you replace both with a new bolt and nut. If the bolt screws into a plate and the threads on the plate are bad, you can purchase a larger self tapping bolt of the same length and it will make new undamaged threads.

Or you can use a bolt and a nut, just make sure the nut does not make contact with any circuit traces with the exception of DC ground. DC ground is the largest traces found on any printed circuit board.

Another thing you can try is removing the CMOS battery from the motherboard, then next to the battery is a jumper, this is the CLEAR CMOS jumper, it is resting on two pins and one pin is vacant. Move this jumper over to the vacant pin, this will discharge all the capacitors on the motherboard.

Wait roughly 5 minutes, then move the jumper back over to the opposite pin where it was originally, then replace the CMOS battery. I suggest a new battery be used, this will eliminate the possibility that the CMOS battery you have now is either weak or dead.

Now if you end up removing the heat sink to repair the damaged or striped threads, I strongly suggest that you examine the CPU for any signs of damage. Mostly heat related.

It would not hurt to remove the CPU to inspect it on the bottom side for any discoloration, which is heat related.

It also may resolve an issue with a faulty contact between the CPU and its electrical contacts.

I also suggest cleaning off any heat sink compound from both the heat spreader of the CPU and the heat sink bottom. Once this is done apply a new bead of heat sink compound on the heat spreader before installing the heat sink on top of the processor.

Try booting up the computer once you are sure everything is reconnected and nothing is shorting out to chassis ground.

If your computer fails to display any video and you are certain everything is connected properly, then this means something on the motherboard has been damaged and may render your motherboard as being unrepairable.

Please keep me updated.

Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 28 December 2012 - 10:56 AM.

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