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Asus anti-surge was triggered...


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#1 Leea934

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 12:05 PM

New build resets sporadically. Nothing in particular seems to trigger it (happens when left alone, when writing emails, playing games, listening to music, etc.)

Once it posts the following message comes up:

Power supply surges detected during the previous power on.
Asus Anti-surge was triggered to protect system from unstable supply unit.

How can I tell if my PSU is faulty (or perhaps not enough juice for what I've got)?

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:08 PM

just out of curiousity, how do you have it plugged in? and how is the electricity in your area?

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 Leea934

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:33 PM

Computer & peripherals plugged into one of those long anti-surge strips (which is plugged into a duplex). I will say that there is a lot of stuff on this circuit, but there is no choice (i.e. Laser printer, air purifier, 2 computers, lamps, sound system)

When the computer does crash and restart - the lights do flicker a little.

Another issue I had is that I may have used a bit too much thermal compound, but I got really lazy so I didnt redo it. Could that cause such instability?

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 09:22 PM

unlikely-to much thermal compound tends to cause overheating issues, unless some dripped onto the motherboard and is causing a short. Do you have another power supply to swap out with to try? and try unplugging all the extras for testing purposes, and perhaps a different surge protector.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#5 westom

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:28 PM

How can I tell if my PSU is faulty (or perhaps not enough juice for what I've got)?


First some basic concepts. Power a computer and a light bulb from the same power strip. If an incandescent bulb dims to 40% intensity, the computer still works just fine. As defined by how power supplies work. AC voltage variations are only significant when AC voltage drops so low as to be potentially destructive to motorized appliances such as the refrigerator. Even voltage that low is ideal and sufficient for any computer.

Now, to address the error message. Nobody can suggest anything useful without measurements from six critical wires from the PSU to motherboard. Set the computer to multitask to as many peripherals as possible. Including complex graphics on the video processor (ie a movie) while searching the disk drive.

Set a $5 or $17 multimeter to 20 VDC range. Measure voltages on the purple, green, and gray wires (from PSU to motherboard). And any one red, orange and yellow wires. Report those voltages to 3 significant digits to then learn fundamental facts about your system.

Does not matter if the system is failing or not. Those numbers will vary little when the machine is working and when it is failing. A defective supply, as defined by numbers, can still boot and run a computer.




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