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What is a sandy bridge and a ivy bridge?


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#1 jeffreysofly

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 08:48 PM

I didnt know where to post this but what is a sandy bridge and a ivy bridge?

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#2 Darkbat

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 09:03 PM

On a computer you have the bridge which you can think of as literally the bridge between the Processor and the Motherboard all communication going between the 2 goes through your bridge and therefore the bridge is a very debated and heated subject. Some points on the Bridges are:

The difference between the 2 is just the bus that the processor uses in order to communicate to the other components of the server

Sandy bridge is the older bus from Intel which was introduced in 2011

Ivy bridge is the newer bus and was introduced mid 2012

as far as specifications go Ivy bridge is a smaller and faster type of communication bus for the Processor.

The Ivy bridge also brought support for the Direct X 11 which did not make a large difference in graphics capability.

The other big difference is that the Ivy Bridge is smaller which means it is more power efficient at full throttle however at idle Ivy and Sandy run at about the same power draw

Another point is that the bridges are compatible with each other which means you can put Newer Procs in the older bridge and older procs in the newer bridge however the firmware may limit that functionality

#3 jeffreysofly

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 09:32 PM

But why is the sandy bridge http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116492 more expensive than the ivy bridge http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819116502

#4 dpunisher

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 09:40 PM

You are comparing apples and oranges. That Sandybridge is a Socket 2011, the Ivy is a Socket 1155. Compare these http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007671%20600095610&IsNodeId=1&name=LGA%201155 all Socket 1155.

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#5 Andrew

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 09:44 PM

Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge are the brand names for Intel's newest (Ivy) and second-newest (Sandy) CPU model. The price difference between the two you linked to are due to the number of CPU cores the processors each have; the expensive one has six cores whereas the cheaper one has only four.

On a computer you have the bridge which you can think of as literally the bridge between the Processor and the Motherboard all communication going between the 2 goes through your bridge and therefore the bridge is a very debated and heated subject. Some points on the Bridges are:


The names, though similar, are unrelated to the terms northbridge and southbridge; Ivy and Sandy bridge are not directly related to these system buses (though one of the features introduced in Sandy Bridge was to move the northbridge directly onto the CPU.)

Further reading:
Ivy Vs. Sandy comparison
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bridge_%28microarchitecture%29
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivy_Bridge_%28microarchitecture%29

Edited by Andrew, 19 December 2012 - 10:42 PM.


#6 jeffreysofly

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:03 PM

Ok thanks everybody :)

#7 Darkbat

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 10:17 PM

Yes, when I say they are backwards compatible I mean only the 1155 socket proc's as there are some differences as you saw in your link. If you look at the Wikipedia links that were provided by Andrew you will see the socket differences between the 2 and see that some are compatible and some are not with each other I apologize I should have stated that previously.

Andrew, I see how what I was stating can be misconstrued to be referencing the North and South bridges I was talking more so the Microarchitecture and connecting to the socket for the Proc as it is easier to be thought of as a bridge connecting the Proc to the socket as it modifies the path that the instruction set will take. Thank you for the Critique I will edit my Ivy, Sandy comparison document.




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