Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Installing a Switch to a Router, Need 12 Ethernet Ports


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 safeskies

safeskies

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:20 AM

Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:52 PM

A coworker was asking me about his home network. He has ethernet ports installed everywhere in his house (12 in total), but not connected to a switch. Near his router he has 12 ethernet cables tied together. His router has 4 ports on it and one is used by his desktop. Depending on what rooms he wants internet accessible, he chooses 3 of the 12 cables to plug into the router. I told him he just needs a switch plugged into the router, and then the 12 cables plugged into that and his whole house will be connected. Another coworker claimed vehemently that this would not work as the router would supply the entire switch with only one IP address. I was under the impression that even though the switch is a 'dumb' device, the router would be able to supply enough addresses through it.

I was looking at this TRENDnet 5-Port Unmanaged Gigabit GREENnet Switch as an option. The person this would be for just wants to have internet access available; he is not a power user by any stretch of the word. My thought was to plug this one and another 8-port version into the router. Would this setup work as intended to give all 12 ethernet ports throughout the house internet access? Thanks!

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 rotor123

rotor123

  • Moderator
  • 8,093 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:05:20 AM

Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:21 PM

Hi, I would just get a 16 port switch and be done with it. A 16 port switch might also be cheaper than a 5 port and a 8 port as well as giving spare connections.

And yes a switch will work very good on a router. That is what a router does. It gives each computer or device connected to the switch a separate Internal to the house IP address. But the user does not need to worry about them. The router sends the proper content to the right port on the switch.

Right now for example my router with 4 ports is using 3 of them for computers and 1 to feed a 8 port gigabit switch. Giving me 11 internet connected devices. Including my Media player, BluRay player etc.

Good Luck
Roger

Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
Forum Rules,    The BC Welcome Guide

167 @ June 2015


#3 safeskies

safeskies
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:20 AM

Posted 11 December 2012 - 06:24 PM

Hi, I would just get a 16 port switch and be done with it. A 16 port switch might also be cheaper than a 5 port and a 8 port as well as giving spare connections.

And yes a switch will work very good on a router. That is what a router does. It gives each computer or device connected to the switch a separate Internal to the house IP address. But the user does not need to worry about them. The router sends the proper content to the right port on the switch.

Right now for example my router with 4 ports is using 3 of them for computers and 1 to feed a 8 port gigabit switch. Giving me 11 internet connected devices. Including my Media player, BluRay player etc.

Good Luck
Roger


That's what I thought but good to get confirmation. The guy who thought this wouldn't work said it was because the router is a smart device and the switch is a dumb device. The router will give the switch one IP address, but the switch can't divvy up IPs. So the only way an internet connection would work, is if only one device is connected to the switch. If there's a second, it would create a conflict as they'd be sharing the same IP address. Now I was pretty sure this was wrong, but there was an element of it that sparked old memories. When would this scenario be true? When using a hub? What was he thinking about? Thanks!

#4 rotor123

rotor123

  • Moderator
  • 8,093 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:05:20 AM

Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:24 PM

It wouldn't work if there was no router. In other words if you were to connect the modem to a switch with no router then it wouldn't work. It would work if the modem had a built in router.

No router no share.

Roger

Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
Forum Rules,    The BC Welcome Guide

167 @ June 2015


#5 safeskies

safeskies
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:20 AM

Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:43 AM

At work we have an interesting setup. The modem connects to a switch. The switch splits to two routers. Both routers are operated independently with a separate range of IPs and different SSIDs. Both routers settings' are set up as if they were directly connected to the modem. I'm surprised this is actually working.

We want to add a third router and were thinking of plugging it into the switch. So we'd have modem to switch to three routers all independent from each other. What are the downsides to this setup? Slower bandwidth maybe?

I would like to eventually change the setup to one of modem to router to three access points. This would be nice so we can just use one SSID and have one router handling all IP addresses. This setup may take some time to get to for various reasons. Is there a clear reason to move from our current setup to the one I just described, or will both work just fine (as long as we're okay with completely separate networks)?

Thanks!

#6 rotor123

rotor123

  • Moderator
  • 8,093 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:05:20 AM

Posted 14 December 2012 - 12:54 PM

The bandwidth out of modem stays the same no matter how many devices use the internet.

What happens is that the bandwidth pool stays the same however if there are more devices using it at the same time with more active connections the smaller the bandwidth available to each device.

Another way to put it, for example we will say you have a 30Mbps connection through the modem. And 30 computers using it. If one computer is the only one using it at a point in time, then it will get the entire 30Mbps. However lets say you have 5 computers all downloading security updates, then each will get 1/5 of the 30Mbps or 6Mbps. And if we have 10 computers doing that then they'll each get 3Mbps.

That is a sort of simplistic description, In the real word other factors come into play that complicate things. If you hook up another router to the switch it still shares that 30Mbps just among more computers.

Hope that helps
Roger

Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

How Does a computer get Infected? http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/2520/how-did-i-get-infected/
Forum Rules,    The BC Welcome Guide

167 @ June 2015


#7 safeskies

safeskies
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:20 AM

Posted 14 December 2012 - 02:33 PM

Using the extra routers as access points, I know you can have them all use the same SSID on different channels and everything works great. If each router is functioning independently (one is 192.168.0.1 and the other 10.0.0.1) with their own DHCP functioning, can they use the same SSID or would the connected devices get confused? My guess is it wouldn't work because you are changing IP addresses whenever you change routers, whereas in a normal access point configuration you shouldn't be getting a new IP. Is this a correct assessment?

#8 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:05:20 AM

Posted 22 December 2012 - 02:52 PM

You do not want the Same SSID on Different Subnets or networks, you will never know (aside from the wrong IP) which network your connecting to. Ideally all the SSID's should be hidden and the wireless connection configured on the client PC to connect to the specific Subnet/Network. This way no one wanders onto the wrong network causing security/connection issues. Or If the Routers are just Access points to the same network either set up one router for DHCP and disable it on the others. Once a DHCP request is sent on the network the DHCP server will answer the request no matter where the connection was established or set all IP's Static so you know who and where all the computers are.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 22 December 2012 - 02:53 PM.

Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users