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Is It Safe To Remove All Hidden Temp Files?


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#1 Soze

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 03:39 PM

I know this has probably been covered, but after screening ~20 pages of topics I finally decided to post.
Is it safe to delete ALL temp files, even hidden ones - including those for individual clients on a shared PC?
Specifically, I find a ton of files within the documents and settings\client name\local settings\temp folder.
I would like to delete, but I don't want to screw anything up.
It is one of the blessings of old friends that you can afford to be stupid with them.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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#2 Herk

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 03:57 PM

For the most part, yes, you can delete all of them. But you can't really, because a few are in use. It's OK to leave the ones that are in use there. (As long as they aren't malware!)

When I empty my Windows temp folder, for instance, I run into a half-dozen files that are in use. Since they're all highlighted, I hold the control key and uncheck the first one and try again. I keep doing this until all files are deleted.

Here's an interesting read on the subject. Pay close attention to the part about the tilde. (~)

#3 Soze

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 04:06 PM

Thanks Herk.
I had come across that site, but these days I don't trust anything until I've had it confirmed by what I consider a reliable source (BP qualifies as such IMHO). So if it's in a temp folder, I guess it's fair game, assuming it CAN be deleted (running files/aps).
It amazes me how much remains after using 'clean-up' utilities.
Oh well, life in the silicon age I guess.
It is one of the blessings of old friends that you can afford to be stupid with them.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

#4 Enthusiast

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Posted 24 March 2006 - 06:13 PM

I would be careful about deleting CHK files unless you know what they are and that they definitely will not be needed.

"So what is a CHK file? Well, any time a program or Windows crashes, any files that were open are not closed properly. Part of closing is writing all the file location information in all the right places. Without this info, Windows can't find all the parts of the file. When SCANDISK or CHKDISK is run, all the parts are identified as "lost file fragments" and converted (if you want) into CHK files. .......... If you were working on (and lost) something important just before a crash, you might want to try to recover any data from any CHK files that exist. On the other hand, if you aren't in a state of panic over lost data, just delete any CHK files. A handy tip: Keep your disk defragmented. That way if you ever do lose it all, the lost file fragments will be more likely to be complete files."
http://www.ericphelps.com/uncheck/




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