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what are other ways to clean the computer?


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#1 CalusBlade

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:07 AM

I usually use a unused soft haired paint brush (well, not really unused but never used it for painting)

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#2 Baltboy

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:54 PM

That is actually not a good thing. The bristles can build a static charge by rubbing against one another. Compressed air is the best option. The only other thing I use to clean with is q-tips with a little isopropyl alcohol.
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#3 CalusBlade

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:27 PM

That is actually not a good thing. The bristles can build a static charge by rubbing against one another. Compressed air is the best option. The only other thing I use to clean with is q-tips with a little isopropyl alcohol.


I thought something like horse hair doesn't build up static

#4 the_patriot11

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:53 PM

Just out of curiousity, what is wrong with compressed air? Its always been effective for me, and a 3 dollar can from wal-mart will usually last me a year.

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#5 Queen-Evie

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:03 PM

I think that is referring to the soft haired paint brush not being a good thing.

#6 ranchhand1

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 08:50 AM

For years I have been cleaning every computer I work on by using a small vacuum cleaner with reversed airflow and a crevice tool. I do it on the rear deck because clouds of dust blow out of the box, but it is left clean and shiny. This works really great to clean the CPU heatsink and vent fans. Many have told me I'm going to destroy the components but in 15 years I never had one thing damaged. No physical object ever touches any component. The problem I had with compressed air cans is two: Cost is ridiculous, and the compressed air causes condensation on the parts and that will harm components.

#7 the_patriot11

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 08:52 PM

thats why you use short bursts ranch. . .though I like your method.

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#8 cat33

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 09:06 PM

For years I have been cleaning every computer I work on by using a small vacuum cleaner with reversed airflow and a crevice tool. I do it on the rear deck because clouds of dust blow out of the box, but it is left clean and shiny. This works really great to clean the CPU heatsink and vent fans. Many have told me I'm going to destroy the components but in 15 years I never had one thing damaged. No physical object ever touches any component. The problem I had with compressed air cans is two: Cost is ridiculous, and the compressed air causes condensation on the parts and that will harm components.

Does your vacuum plug into an electrical outlet. I was hoping to use my vacuum cleaner's leaf blower.

#9 CalusBlade

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:29 PM

do those hand held vacuums work? not the ones that are plugged in but the ones that run on some kinda battery that can be recharged

#10 ranchhand1

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:26 PM

I don't use a small hand-held with a rotating brush like a Dirt Devil; it is an Orec XL, has a sling for over the shoulder, but any canister vac will work. After you use this you will never use anything else. Yes, it plugs into a standard house outlet. The crevice tool allows you to direct the air flow exactly where you want it. A leaf blower may be too strong, depending on the air stream strength.

#11 Nanobyte

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:22 AM

I would not use a brush for the reasons already mentioned by others. Dustbuster is fine if you use it sparingly. The CPU heat sink can be done in a couple of squirts if you are using the long nozzle. A couple more squirts does the cards, PSU, fans and drives. I have two PCs and one can has lasted me 2 years. If you blast away for 15 seconds at a time, it won't last very long. They say and mean short blasts. It's a good idea to have your vacuum cleaner running to suck up the dust that is released (or an electric fan sending it well away).

There are small specialized compressor/blowers that are good if you have a lot of PCs to clean. An oil-free garage compressor with cleaning nozzle should also be fine. If you live in humid climates then you need to drain the receiver of water every so often. Once in a while I use my garage compressor to clean out fluff. Dustbuster is better for loosening the hard stuff. I'm sure my leaf blower would be ace, until the day I forgot to switch back to blower from collector/mulcher.

#12 the_patriot11

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:59 PM

problem with air compressors they often shoot out to much air and can damage capacitors.

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#13 rotor123

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:11 AM

problem with air compressors they often shoot out to much air and can damage capacitors.


I watched someone use a air compressor to clean a keyboard on a laptop.
Bad idea as the keys started blowing off of the keyboard. The next thing that happened was obscenities filled the air followed by the sight of someone on their hands and knees searching for and picking up the keys from where they had landed.

The other thing to watch out for using pressurized air is not to overspeed the fan. I also saw several people break the cpu fan blades off with a brush or the air started them spinning and they hit the blade and broke it that way.

I never saw them damage capacitors however. What kind of damage?

Cheers
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Edited by rotor123, 29 November 2012 - 10:12 AM.

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#14 Nanobyte

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:54 AM

It seems that some people use air compressor guns like they're blowing swarf out the machine shop door. No finesse. You don't stick 100psi an inch away from a plastic fan and give it full blast. Before you start, you do some practice puffs with the gun away from anything including yourself to gauge how responsive it is, and that it does not stick. Some eye protection is fairly mandatory. To clean a specific area you position the nozzle so it's exactly where it needs to be, avoiding any fragile parts, then give "instantaneous" puffs. To clear the dust that is thrown up, you stand back a foot or more and give a longer blast. If you are clumsy, you don't use 100psi you use a pressure you are comfortable with. Be prepared to whip the gun away if the valve sticks.

If you use commonsense you can clean a keyboard, computer, a desktop full of papers or a machine shop floor.

Edited by Nanobyte, 29 November 2012 - 10:56 AM.


#15 CalusBlade

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:45 PM

alright one last question for this topic. What is the distance you wanna keep with a can of air? Form the head to the circuit board/mother board/etc. . . .




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