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studio montors for pc use?


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#1 bee24

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 05:47 PM

Maybe some of you know about this stuff and can help me out. I got 2 samson resound rs12m speakers for free and and I want to use these for home use in a stereo or pc. I really don't know anything about this stuff. I included a picture of the connecters. I know you can use the 1/4 wire into 1/8 into a computer but, how do you power these things? I dont really want to spend alot of money on these. thanks in advance.

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#2 Platypus

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:10 PM

According to Samson they're not studio monitors:

http://www.samsontech.com/samson/products/pa-cabinets/resound/rs12m/

they're PA foldback wedges. There's no reason why they couldn't be used as general purpose PA type speakers, but I don't imagine they will deliver a very refined sound. They should however be loud.

You will need an amplifier to drive them. They're rated 175 Watt, with 8 Ohm impedance. Any modern amplifier will be suitable for home use, as 8 Ohm has been standard load impedance for decades, and efficient speakers like that will fill a room with any power from a few tens of watts.

It would just be a matter of having the appropriate leads - quarter inch jacks from the speakers to whatever speaker output is on the amp (typically bare wires), and 1/8 (3.5mm) stereo to RCA pair is usually what you'd need for computer to amp line in. If you found a straight power amp, it could also have 1/4" inputs, but the output from the computer may not have enough signal level to directly drive a power amp well.

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#3 bee24

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:36 PM

Thanks for the response, I understand mostly now. I have a receiver here in the house and tested this out. Are there adapters for 1/4" to the 2 bare wires? I removed the input cover on the speakers and and connected to a circuit board were the 2 bare wires for the 2 speakers inside the box. So i could cut the bare wires and bypass the 1/4 connecter all together, right? Another question, when I had one of the speakers connected to the receiver here, the receiver kept turning off if I increased the volume, is this just because the connections are bad or because the amp is too old?

Edited by bee24, 23 November 2012 - 08:11 PM.


#4 Nanobyte

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 01:00 AM

If you are doing the wiring job yourself, you have to make sure the speakers are wired in phase (the pluses and minuses are correctly connected). If they are wired out of phase (one speaker is pushing while the other is sucking) you end up with reduced volume. Ideally put the speakers fairly close and play a track in mono (or similar audio from each stereo channel). If you swop the wires of one speaker, the volume should be a lot louder when (correctly) in phase. If they sound OK from the start, skip the test!

I think the tip of the 1/4" jack is normally positive.

#5 Platypus

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 03:41 AM

1/4 inch jacks could be soldered up with speaker wire easily enough by someone who can solder. As nanobyte said, to use both speakers each needs to be wired the same way (polarity).

If the specifications match (i.e.the amp is rated for 8 Ohm operation and the speakers are in fact 8 Ohm), there should be no cause for the amp to shut off. The speaker may be faulty (hence the give-away?) or you might have connected it wrong internally. You would need to connect one of each wire from the amp to one of the pair of wires running from the input connectors (1/4" or Speakon) to usually a cross-over of some kind. If you have tapped directly into the wires running to one of the drivers, you could be loading the amp wrongly somehow back through the crossover.

I assume the receiver works fine with other speakers?

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