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Planning a New Home Internet Setup


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4 replies to this topic

#1 lohryx5

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 07:07 PM

I’m looking for some help in changing my current setup and am trying to keep it as simple as possible while still being a good setup for my kids who are heavily into gaming. I have the following:

• 3 Desktop Computers
• 1 Laptop
• 1 PS3

I will soon be adding:

• 1 Desktop Computer
• 1 Laptop (possibly)

I have cable internet which feeds into a Motorola Surfboard SB6121 which feeds into a NETGEAR RangeMax Wireless-N Gigabit Router WNR3500 (pictures below).

I have patch cords from the router feeding the 2 computers and PS3 located in the den. The router also wirelessly feeds the laptop in the living room and another computer in one of the bedrooms upstairs. I want to go with a more dedicated wired setup while still having WiFi as an option, particularly for the wife’s tablet and our smartphones.

I would like to move my internet setup to the closet in the master bedroom upstairs and then run CAT 5e (or possibly CAT 6?) to all the rooms where I want dedicated Ethernet jacks. The wall in the closet has easy access to incoming cable, power, and the attic through which I would run all the Ethernet cable. I think my best option would be to drop it down the same holes that currently exist for the RG-6 coax cable in each room.

I would like to end up with the following:

- Den
* 1 Desktop Computer
* 1 PS3

- Living Room
* 1 Desktop Computer
* 1 Laptop

- Top Left Bedroom
* 1 Desktop Computer

- Bottom Left Bedroom
* 1 Desktop Computer

- Master Bedroom
* 1 Laptop

I know I definitely feel it would be best to install something like a keystone wall plate in each room. The den and living room would each need a wall plate with a minimum of 1 coax and 2 ethernet ports. The den will have a desktop computer and the PS3, and the living room will have the laptop and possibly a desktop dedicated to art projects. For the bedrooms, I think I can get by with 1 coax and 1 ethernet port each, but wasn’t sure if I should go with 2 ethernet ports in case any of the kids wanted to move the PS3 upstairs.

Since the wireless router only has 4 ports, what is the best way to connect to all the rooms? Can I split the cable from the TV in the Master Bedroom to feed both the TV and the modem, or should I just have another dedicated coax run into the house for the modem only? If I wanted to continue using the same wireless router, I also have a NETGEAR WiFi Ranger Extender currently located in the Dining Room...not sure if that would help for any signal loss by placing the router in the closet upstairs. Appreciate any and all advice, guidance, and tips. Thanks.


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Edited by lohryx5, 22 November 2012 - 07:17 PM.


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#2 jhayz

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 01:05 AM

You might be interested on this setup, just in case http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1895/1/

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#3 Donald.CNS

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 01:32 AM

You could simply add a layer 2 device, such as a switch, to your router. This will add ports to your network and won't increase latency. The switch won't even require an IP address. Switches are cheap and efficient. If you decide to use a HUB (layer 1 device), then you will increase network traffic and eat up some bandwidth. Not recommended.

Also, cat6 or higher is what you want to use. Using as many devices as you are, your collision domain will get busy. Plus, the speeds of the devices and programs that are coming out to the market are only getting faster. You don't want to "bottleneck" your network before you even reach your ISP.

Hope this helps.

Donald

Edited by Donald.CNS, 23 November 2012 - 05:21 AM.


#4 uByte

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:56 AM

Just a thought why don't you buy a couple of wireless cards for the desktops and forget running the wires all around the house and just use wireless? I know you won't have the best connection and might not achieve the speeds that you might want but it would be a lot easier then running your wires everywhere. I might even upgrade the wireless router to an N router and use the other as a repeater.

#5 lohryx5

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 09:50 AM

Jhazy, I did look at the powerline options about a month ago but must admit that I really don't know too much much about them. The little that I have researched online came up with mixed results, particularly with interference from other signals or trouble streaming 1080. Some have even claimed that they had worse connection when compared to their N-wireless signal. Considering all three of my sons are heavily into FPS gaming, I'm not sure that this would help. Additionally, while not as big of an issue, my wall outlets are pretty much full in the areas where I would plug the powerline adapter, but I did see that they do have ac-passthrough models. I guess this is an option, but considering the number of rooms involved it would increase the cost considerably over pulling cable to each room. The XAV5004, for example, would push the cost to about $100 per room so I could have multiple ports there.

uByte, right now, only 1 of the desktop computers does not have a wireless card, though the one I will be building for my youngest son will not have one either, so that will make 2 desktops that will not have a wireless card. It wouldn't be too much of an issue to install one in each, but I was looking at the wired option more for future-proofing each room by providing dedicated lines. Plus, the wireless signal has not been the most reliable and has dropped connection from time to time. Not too big of an issue to me, but frustrating in the middle of an online game. I'm currently doing a lot of home remodeling and figured it might be a good idea to go ahead and run cable now that I have some of the walls open and stuff.

Donald, I was wondering if it was really that simple. I had seen some 8 and 24-port switches that are really cheap and was curious if that was the only other thing I would really need. Can I connect the cable to Modem > Switch > Rooms and connect the N-wireless to one of the ports downstairs for better WiFi reception on the lower level? The router has to be between the modem and swithc right? So I have to connect it cable > Modem > Router > Switch > Rooms?

Thanks guys, I appreciate the help.

John




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