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Confusing Conundrum


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#1 UnSilentNight

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:45 AM

I've got a problem that has been plaguing me for some time now. I've basically built a new computer from an old one of mine. The last one basically has the same problem this one is having. When starting up it sits idle and the fans run at full speed. No bios load or anything. So, I was told my a majority that it was the motherboard. I bought a motherboard and installed it. It worked at first then developed the same issue after about two boots. I figured that I had the same issue, but just to be sure took it to someone else. They told me the same thing. Bad mobo. Now I've done this for a little while and know what I'm doing for the most part, and have no clue what it could be. I've changed the motherboard twice now just to be sure the new one I got wasn't faulty.
Specs:
3 gigs DDR3 ram
Intel Desktop Board DX580G <New
i7 920 LGA1366 CPU
GeForce GTX 260 1792MB
Corsair GS700 Power Supply <New

I've no clue what it could be at this point. I'd guess processor but people say they highly doubt it is the processor. SO at this point I have no clue as to what it could be. If you could kindly throw a few ideas my way and maybe some solutions as well I would be very appreciative. Thanks in advance, and if you any questions, please just ask.

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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:35 AM

Questions: Fans? CPU fan, or are you running case fans from motherboard headers as well? Is it just your CPU fan going full throttle, or are all case fans running full blast?

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#3 Baltboy

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 10:50 AM

Tried an true is to strip everything not needed to get it to boot. So go with the Motherboard, CPU, Video Card, and ONE stick of memory(be sure it is in slot 1). Try to boot if it makes it to the BIOS one of the unconnected devices is to blame. Connect them one by one till it does not boot again and that is the culprit. If it does not boot switch to a different memory module and try again until you have tried all three. Also check you memory specs to be sure it falls in the voltage requirements of your motherboard. It does not support anything over 1.5 volt. I have sen lots of problems with people trying to run high performance memory that needs 1.65 volts or more in motherboards that dont support it. Try it with a different video card as well bad expansion cards can cause a computer to not boot. Lastly if you cant get a known working power supply to test with then you will have eliminated everything but the CPU and the Motherboard.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#4 dpunisher

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 12:11 PM

.................and I completely misunderstood the original post...duh...................................

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#5 UnSilentNight

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 01:18 PM

Thanks for the quick responses guys!

I have tried all 3 of my ram sticks, all one at a time. I've disconnected everything not needed to boot from the computer and tried it that way. I know that it most definitely isn't my power supply. I calculated everything, put and chose this one specifically for the system; so it has to be getting enough power. This is the second mobo I've put in it. At first I figured since it didn't boot up and people had told me it was the motherboard that I'd replace the "replacement" board. So I did that and still no progress, with the same issue. So, I don't think it is the motherboard.

@ dpunisher: it is the liquid cooling system fan I have on it, and the case fans that are spinning full speed. The power supply boots up and then stops its fan shortly in, while the others speed on full blast.

I appreciate all the responses guys, please keep em coming.

#6 dpunisher

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:55 PM

http://downloadmirror.intel.com/19452/eng/DX58OG_ProductGuide01_English.pdf

I noticed it has a post code LED on it. Any codes displayed during post?

Honestly, at this point, I would pull the board, lay it on a piece of cardboard or non conductive material. Install CPU, cooler, one stick of RAM in the proper slot, and video card, nothing else. Hook up the main connector and the 4/8 pin connector. Short the 2 power pins on the board, and see if it will post. I had an X58 system until last week and it was picky about which slots were occupied.

Personally, I have never had a bad CPU, and it is the last thing I would suspect. You might pull the CPU and doublecheck the socket contacts just to be sure. Look for any burn/scorch markes on the CPU, or heat damage to the socket contacts.

I do wish you luck. I hate that feeling more than anything to have a build not post after you put everything together. My latest build pulled that on me, and to be truthful, the diag would have been quicker if I had taken half an hour to RTFM and find out what the blinking LED by the memory slots meant.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#7 UnSilentNight

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:32 PM

Yeah, I get no post codes sadly. The one before this one was the same brand, it was the one I had sent back. It started about twice, and then I couldn't get it to start again after that. Not sure if that bit of information helps at all or not lol. I'm desperately grabbing at what I can at this point.

#8 tg1911

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 12:30 PM

... I know that it most definitely isn't my power supply. I calculated everything, put and chose this one specifically for the system; so it has to be getting enough power....

Just because it's a new PSU, does not mean it is not defective.
Have you tested it?

This is the part that concerns me.

The power supply boots up and then stops its fan shortly in, while the others speed on full blast.

The PSU fan should always be running.

Reading PSU Rail Voltages

Caution: Please read this before continuing.


• Since it will be necessary for your computer to be on during this procedure, you need to be aware that you will be working with live 12Volt DC potentials, which if handled improperly may lead to electrical shock.

• There are electronics inside the case that are very susceptible to electrostatic discharges. To protect your computer, touch the metal of the case to discharge yourself of any electrostatic charges before touching any of the components inside.

• If you are not comfortable doing this procedure, then I would suggest that you not use this tutorial. The risks involved are minimal, but are there nevertheless. Anyone who uses this tutorial will be doing so at their own risk.


There are two devices commonly used to read the rail voltages: a PSU tester, and a multimeter.

The PSU tester is the easiest to use since all that is necessary is to plug the different connectors into the tester and read the results on the LCD display. The problem with most of these is that they only perform a pass/fail test. They will not provide you with actual voltage readings.

There are a variety of multiple meters, but this tutorial will address Analog and Digital multimeters. The advantage of these meters is that you will be able to obtain accurate real time voltage readings.

For those of you who wish to know more about multimeters there is an excellent article in Wikipedia.


Analog Multimeter

Posted Image


An Analog multimeter is a little more complicated to use. Both Analog and Digital multimeters need to be set to the appropriate voltage, but with an Analog multimeter, you will need to choose the voltage range and must read the proper scale.

The Analog multimeter uses a needle display which moves from 0 across the scale until it reaches the voltage being tested. This multimeter has five major linear divisions with multiple scales to read a variety of ranges. An example would be three different ranges. The first is graduated in increments of 0 through 5, the second, 0 through 10, and the third, 0 through 25. Each of these ranges are subdivided into divisions that are graduated into tenths. In order to read 12 volts the 0 through 25 range would be the appropriate one.

Because DC voltage has positive and negative potentials this device is polar sensitive, this means that if you reverse the two probes when reading a positive DC voltage it will read as a negative voltage. This is actually necessary to read negative DC voltages. The two probes are differentiated by their color, Black (negative), and Red (positive). To read a positive DC voltage, the correct probes must be used with their corresponding potentials (positive to positive and negative to negative).

With the probes being used normally to read a negative DC voltage, the needle moves from the 0 to the left, "pegging" the needle. By reversing the probes you can properly read the negative voltages.

Digital Multimeter

Posted Image


The Digital multimeter (DMM) is much simpler to use. As was mentioned previously, you will need to set the appropriate voltage. One of the advantages is that the DMM has an LCD display with a numeric readout, so there are not any multiple scales to read. Another advantage is that most DMMs are autoranging when reading voltages, which means that you will not need to set the range with these DMMs. A DMM will read both positive and negative DC voltages and display them correctly. When reading a negative voltage, a minus sign will appear on the display before the numeric value. This still is a polar sensitive device, so you will still need to use the positive and negative probes with their corresponding potentials.

There are five different DC rail voltages which are color coded. The Black wires are always negative.

Yellow +12VDC

Blue -12VDC

Red +5VDC

White -5VDC

Orange +3.3VDC


There are only three voltages that can be measured easily without disconnecting the 20/24 pin connector from the motherboard: +12V, +5V, and +3.3V.

The +12V and +5V voltages can be read from a four pin Molex power connector.

Four pin Molex power connector

Posted Image


The same voltages can be taken from a four pin SATA power connector, but in order to read the +3.3V you will need to read this from a five pin SATA power connector as seen below.

Five pin SATA power connector.

Posted Image

To read these voltages you will need to insert the Black (-) probe into any of the black sockets, and insert the Red (+) probe in the different colored voltage sockets. To read the voltages from a SATA power connector it is easiest to insert the probes into the back of the connector where the wires enter. Unfortunately the sockets of the modular SATA power connectors are not accessible from the back, so the readings will need to be made from the socket side. Some probes are going to be too large to fit in these sockets, so you may need to insert a piece of wire into the socket of which you want to read the voltage of and place the probe on this for your reading. To reduce the potential of creating a short I would suggest taking the ground potential from another connector so that the two wires will remain physically separated.

Caution: It is very important to make sure that you don't allow the two probes to touch each other when taking the voltage readings. This will cause a short which could damage the PSU or other components.

To get accurate readings of the rail voltages it is important that there be a load on the PSU. In order to do this I would suggest downloading Prime95 for this purpose. This program was designed to be used by overclockers to put a full load on the RAM and CPU to determine the stability of their overclocking. Because of this it will put stress on the CPU and RAM which will create higher than normal temperatures. For this reason I would suggest not running this program any longer than is necessary. I would also suggest that an inspection be made of the interior of the case to make sure that there isn’t an accumulation of dust which would impede adequate cooling. Pay special attention to the heat sink and fan assembly on the CPU. If there is a dedicated graphics card with a fan installed on it, look at this fan as well.


Readings should not have variances larger than +/- five percent.

Maximum.........Minimum
12.6V.................11.4V
5.25V.................4.75V
3.47V.................3.14V
MOBO: GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P, CPU: Phenom II X4 955 Deneb BE, HS/F: CoolerMaster V8, RAM: 2 x 1G Kingston HyperX DDR2 800, VGA: ECS GeForce Black GTX 560, PSU: Antec TruePower Modular 750W, Soundcard: Asus Xonar D1, Case: CoolerMaster COSMOS 1000, Storage: Internal - 2 x Seagate 250GB SATA, 2 x WD 1TB SATA; External - Seagate 500GB USB, WD 640GB eSATA, 3 x WD 1TB eSATA

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#9 UnSilentNight

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 12:32 AM

Installed a
Intel BX80601W3565 Xeon W3565 Processor - 4 Core, 3.2GHz, LGA 1366, 4.80 GT/s Intel QPI, 8MB Cache, 64-Bit, 130W, HyperThreading

It works completely fine now...Thanks for the help guys!




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