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I need some help


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#1 1QWK96GT

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:51 PM

I have a home built computer that has a intel i7 2600k processor. My home built has two hardrives 1tb for my windows 7 and I installed a 250gb hard drive I wanna use for LinuxMint. So I went through the installation on the hard drive it was asking me about swap space which I am not sure what that is all about so I continued without setting a swap space. I also was curious should i get 64bit or 32bit for my 2600k processor? Now for the main problem when I turn on my computer it tries to automatically boot into windows. but if I interupt it and tell it to boot into the 250gb Linuxmint hard drive all I get is a blinking cursor. Do I need this Grub or boot.ini? I would prefer to boot to the linux 250gb hard drive through bios if I want but I am not opposed to using a bootloader.

Please help. Thanks

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#2 buddy215

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:10 AM

Swap is disk space that the computer may use as virtual memory.

Very good instructions and info for you in link below.
Dual-boot Ubuntu 12.04 and Windows 7 on a computer with 2 hard drives
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#3 Dethadder

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:01 PM

There are few ways you can go about dual booting, the way you are suggesting is the way that I usually recommend to new uses of linux. One of the biggest mistakes (not always the keyboard actuators fault) is when the MBR crashes into another hard drive or another partition with a different OS. The installs are supposed to be smart enough to handle the install with a few simple clicks; however this is seldom the case. Id recommend unplugging all the drives other than the 250G which you plan to install on. Running your install, and then using the BIOS of the machine to determine which system to boot from. Once you have a stable system, then plug the other drives back in.

You are right though, usually the issue is the grub loader is corrupt or missing. SWAP is usually used as a RAM overflow, do not get rid of it! It can make your system unstable and its not recommended. The appropriate amount of SWAP is based on the gigs of RAM in your PC.

4G RAM 2 GB SWAP

4-6 G RAM 4 GB SWAP

12-64G RAM 8 GB SWAP

64-256G RAM +16G SWAP

As far as 64BIT vs. 32BIT: It all depends on your processor. If you have one capable of running 64bit, use 64bit to maximize your systems physical components. Most people will recommend this as well. Does this help?:thumbup2:



#4 1QWK96GT

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:34 PM

Okay I did the tutorial and everything worked great. One thing I am unclear on though. When i was walking through the tutorial one thing says create a partition thats called /home and to put as much hard drive space there as you can. So I was assuming this was going to be the space available to store stuff within linux. Then later in the tutorial I noticed he had "Free space" left over then I started to wonder is this the space where he was storing stuff? Cause I structured my linux installation where practically all hard drive space was in the /home section. with no "free space" left over.

Thanks

#5 1QWK96GT

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 09:03 PM

I also cannot figure out how to install a program. I downloaded it executed the folder directory in the terminal and at the end put in ./utserver and it keeps throwing errors ./utserver: error while loading shared libraries: libssl.so.0.9.8: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

Help I have no idea what I am doing here. Its really frustrating. Are all program installations like this?

#6 HardCo_core

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 10:33 PM

Do you know the size of the free space ?


Concerning the ./utserver issue, the error you get simply means that you don't have the "libssl.so.0.9.8" installed.
To install it, try the following commands :

- sudo apt-cache search libssl0.9.8
(on ubuntu 12.10, the result I get is "libssl0.9.8")

- sudo apt-get install libssl0.9.8

It should work.

If not, you can also try to make a symbolic link , also called symlink ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbolic_link , if you don't know what it is).

To do so :
On a 32-bit install:

sudo ln -s /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libssl.so**.1.0.0** /usr/lib/libssl.so.0.9.8

On a 64-bit install:

sudo ln -s /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libssl.so**.1.0.0** /usr/lib/libssl.so.0.9.8

I hope this was useful :)

Edited by HardCo_core, 15 November 2012 - 10:34 PM.


#7 buddy215

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:00 AM

Always check in the Software Center or whatever Mint calls it for the program you want to install.
Most likely the program will be there and the installer will most likely install any dependencies...needed packages for
the program you want to install.

Any Mint users reading this? The reason I ask...I saw on the web that many are installing the Ubuntu Software Center
as it is preferred by them over the Mint one.

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”




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