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Systray Time Gradually Jumps Several Minutes Ahead


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#1 heldmacm

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 12:42 PM

Hello,

I've been having a problem for quite some time in XP Professional where the time displayed in the systray jumps ahead several minutes over the course of every day. In a 24 hour span, I'd estimate it "gains" four minutes and the amount of time it gains is consistent each day. Once I noticed the clock is fast every morning, I successfully sync the time with either of the servers, and that temporarily gives me the accurate time. However, as the day wears on, the clock jumps ahead. For what it's worth, the checkbox "Automatically synchronize with an Internet time server" is checked, but this either isn't occurring or it's not occurring frequently enough. As mentioned, I've tried using both the time servers.

I've done some research on this problem and most posts indicated replacing the CMOS battery would address that. I recently did that and unfortunately, it has not solved the issue at all. As a result, I'm at a loss (no pun intended). Your help with this would greatly be appreciated.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:24 PM

The systray clock...is the same as the BIOS clock.

If you properly replaced the CMOS battery with a new one...and then reset your CMOS settings to default values and saved the changes...what you describe should not be happening.

I've never known CMOS changes to go forwards, only backwards to prior years...but I suppose it's possible that the date/time could move forward in error.

Louis

#3 heldmacm

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:03 PM

The systray clock...is the same as the BIOS clock.

If you properly replaced the CMOS battery with a new one...and then reset your CMOS settings to default values and saved the changes...what you describe should not be happening.

I've never known CMOS changes to go forwards, only backwards to prior years...but I suppose it's possible that the date/time could move forward in error.

Louis


Thanks for your reply. I think the POST screen mentioned the CMOS settings were reset to their default values after I replaced the battery, but to make sure, I just went in there and reset them. The clock in the BIOS was correct, and at least for now, the systray clock is correct. I'll certainly monitor this moving forward.

Thanks again.

#4 heldmacm

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 09:08 AM

I'm still having this issue after doing what you suggested.

#5 hamluis

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:04 AM

Do the BIOS clock and the systray time match?

Everything I see points to the CMOS battery...and it is possible for a failing battery to cause the clock to speed up, as opposed to typically slowing down.

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 11 November 2012 - 11:07 AM.


#6 Nanobyte

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:07 AM

Doesn't the CMOS battery only come into play when the PC is totally disconnected from power? I understood that if the PC is running, the clock voltage comes from the PS. If the PC is off but connected, power still comes from the PS. I had my old Windows 3.x PC off but plugged into the mains for 10 years, no battery change, and it still ran. Perhaps the Energizer Bunny ads are true.

Possibilities I can think of is that the 3.3V is off-spec or the MB is overheating (or by inference, very dusty).

Edit: To temporarily cure the problem run a synchronizing utility every hour. I normally use WebTime which can run in the background with the /auto switch. I do it manually from a shortcut whenever I feel like it. There are other small utilities which allow you to set the synchronize interval (as an example I googled Atomic Clock Sync).

Edited by Nanobyte, 11 November 2012 - 11:41 AM.


#7 heldmacm

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:34 AM

Thank you for the help - I'll give it a try.




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