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PSU advice


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#1 RB_Kandy

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 08:22 PM

I know that you can't go by wattage alone, and you need a trusted name like Seasonic if you expect a PSU to actually deliver stated wattage. And deliver smooth clean electricity that will pamper your expensive hardware, instead of tear it up with noisy electricity.
But, you still have to go by wattage LOL
I am wondering if the Seasonic 1050 watt is over kill for this build:
CPU: Intel 3770K ivy bridge
Video: two Nvidia GTX 660 Ti (150 watts each)
RAM: 4 sticks
HDD: 4, 7200 RPM
Fans: 6 hi performance 120mm
Optic drives: 1 DVD/CD and 1 Blue Ray
Plus RAID and Fan Controllers

I put these things into the thermaltake calculator (I have no idea how reliable this thing is), accounted for extreme over clocking, and my entire system load at 100% and it recommends 763 watt for this worse case scenario.
So I think the 1050 is overkill.

I realize that I am accounting for over clocking and worst case scenario, and therefor 750 or the seasonic 760 would be fine.
However, I don't know how reliable the thermaltake calculator is http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power

And something else I am wanting to take into consideration. If I buy a really good case, and a really good PSU, then in 5 or 6 years when I build a whole new system, I can keep the ATX case and PSU, because I don't see the ATX standard dying anytime soon.
Also, I hear that PSU's stop delivering their total stated wattage over time, and that it's never a good idea to push a PSU near its max.

So I don't know guys, is the 1050 truly overkill? Should I buy this beast because it's better safe than sorry? Is it foolish to buy a PSU that's overkill just to make my machine upgrade proof, or even plan to run a whole new system in 5 years on this PSU?

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#2 Skydie

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 08:38 PM

Going for a good brand is wise. I mean in the future you may need to upgrade and its good to know that you're PSU had sufficient headroom for a small upgrade in case you need to looking ahead.When my old GPU started overheating I had to replace my PSU and GPU, not really my fault as Dell packed it with 100W less than the retailer recommended -.- but hey thats another story.

Also by going for a decent brand you're doing yourself a favour, if you're going to make a good PC its imperative not to cut back on the PSU. A friend of mine bought some rubbish 25 700W PSU and to be fair it lasted him a while, but then in the summer it blew up and he was lucky his components didn't fry - apparently you could see the smoke coming out...

#3 dpunisher

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 08:58 PM

And something else I am wanting to take into consideration. If I buy a really good case, and a really good PSU, then in 5 or 6 years when I build a whole new system, I can keep the ATX case and PSU, because I don't see the ATX standard dying anytime soon.
Also, I hear that PSU's stop delivering their total stated wattage over time, and that it's never a good idea to push a PSU near its max.


On a bad day, overclocked that system may pull in the 420 watt range, so yes, a 1050 watt PSU is overkill. If you have the cash to throw at it, get as big a PSU as you want, but realize except for gaming/hardware assist coding, you likely wont be pulling more than 120 watts through that PSU as you surf or watch a movie.

As far as ATX being the standard for the next 5-6 years, maybe, maybe not. I lean towards not. I have this sneaking suspician that we have about 3-4 years left of desktops as we know them. Almost every advance is in the area of power saving and cost. We might be at the point soon that sub 100 watt systems, with everything integrated, do about all we need them to do. Strangely enough, the next round of consoles, and their graphics requirements, will determine to a large extent what video cards, expansion slots, power, and size requirements will be required for the "PC". Games are "cross platform" and the weakest hardware determines the video quality of the game. We have had a bit of an artificial stagnation graphicswise since 2006 due to XBOX and PS3. If the new round of consoles rock, and graphics are top notch, then newer, hotter, power hungry videocards will be offered, and some sort of ATX variant might be with us. Maybe new processes will make "hotter/power hungry" cards redundant and everything gets moved to a smaller formfactor. Of course, I could just be full of it.

I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

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#4 killerx525

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 12:42 AM

The 760W Seasonic should be more then enough :thumbup2:

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#5 RB_Kandy

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 01:28 AM

Skydie, yeah, it appears we agree on the importance of top quality brand name PSU's
Every precious delicate and expensive piece of hardware relies on a smooth stable current from that PSU. Honestly, I think a lot of times hardware goes up after a few years from the PSU power fluctuations grinding it down. And there's of course as you pointed out, the possibility that one day it goes "poof" and fries the mobo and everything on it.

Dpunisher, I suspect you might be right about Desktops going the way of the dinosaur. Everyone is using laptops and phones.
I shutter to think a decade from now that everyone is computing on a phone, and no one owns any piece of software, it's all vaporware that resides on "the cloud".

However, if the desktop becomes a thing of the past in 5 years, than the way I look at it, this will be my last build LOL.
However, if desktops are still around, I doubt the ATX standard will die off. In fact, the less common the desk top is, the more likely the standards are to remain the same. It's only when we see a technological surge that standards have to be bumped up to match the new technology.
I think you might be right about next generation hardware consuming less power.

Personally, I think this is the best time to buy a computer.
The reason I think this is because SATA and USB 3.0 just recently came out, and it's been 11 years since the release of USB 2.0, I don't think we'll be seeing USB 4.0 any time soon. And I see no reason for SATA4 either. If you can ever find a high capacity drive that hits SATA3 maximum throughput, I seriously don't think you need more speed than that. If you seriously needed more speed, just go with a RAMDisk.
Speaking of RAM, that's something else I don't see changing much. Most good cheap sticks of DDR3 run at speeds greater than a mobo's native speed. So if DDR3 is capable of far greater clock speeds than anything high end mother boards can handle at native speed, why would we see DDR4 (or equivalent). For Graphics cards sure, but not for mobos. And most mobos allow up to 32 gigs of RAM. No one needs more than 8 for anything other than RAMDisk. So RAM isn't changing anytime soon.

As for GPU's and CPU's, I am liable to be wrong, but I honestly think we're hitting our limits of what running electricity through silicone can accomplish.
The only improvement in desktops we're going to see is server CPU's like the Intel Xenon's coming down in price, and getting put in desktops. And SSD prices dropping.
As long as motherboards remain ATX form factor (which there is no reason they wouldn't) than cases will be ATX form factor. So I see no reason why PSU's would change from their current ATX size and plugs.

But yeah, that 1050 probably is overkill. I'd just never forgive myself if I got the 760 watt version and one day needed more power.

I would still like to get more opinions. If I don't go with the 1050 watt, I will go with the 760 watt.

#6 RB_Kandy

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 04:18 PM

I've made up my mind. I am buying the 760 watt Seasonic




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