Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Available Memory


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 rowal5555

rowal5555

    Just enough info to be armed & dangerous...


  • Members
  • 2,644 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Kilda, Dunedin. South Island. NZ
  • Local time:02:14 AM

Posted 18 March 2006 - 09:37 PM

I have 512MB of installed DDR SDRAM and always run FreeRAM XP Pro which has a window in the taskbar showing available memory. When this gets down around 50MB, I run the autofree option which only takes a few seconds and frees up 100-150MBs.
My question, just out of interest, is where was that extra memory locked up, and why?
My PC came with 256MB installed and I put in another 256 stick but there is very seldom 256MB available, which suggests to me that the standard 256MB is not enough on the average set up?????

rowal5555 (Rob )                                                             

Avid supporter of Bleeping Computer's
Team 38444

You can help find a cure


 


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Herk

Herk

  • Members
  • 1,609 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:S.E. Idaho, USA
  • Local time:09:14 AM

Posted 18 March 2006 - 10:20 PM

If you're using XP, you should have a minimum of 512mb in my opinion. I often install extra memory in computers and show the customer how they were using most of their memory before the installation, but after the installation they are using more than half of it. (In other words, after upgrading the memory to 512, they are using more than 256.)

When you don't have enough memory, Windows swaps some of it out to the hard drive, which tends to slow things up. Once you have more, Windows uses the swap file, hence the hard drive, less.

When you free up memory, you are removing things from memory. Two things are happening: first, Windows stores things that are in use in memory, and second, some programs can leave ghosts behind. Though they are supposed to remove what is not being used anymore, sometimes this does not work. The downside to memory cleaning programs is that they can remove something that's currently needed in memory. I used to use a program like that years ago on Windows 98 and it would occasionally screw something up.

Because Windows 98 was worse at handling things in memory, it would often "load up" the memory and crash the computer, which is why it was necessary to restart Windows about once a day. XP is more stable and will run much longer without a restart. However, I've observed that many computers that have less than 512 megs of RAM with XP will sometimes break - system files will disappear or worse.

#3 rowal5555

rowal5555

    Just enough info to be armed & dangerous...

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2,644 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Kilda, Dunedin. South Island. NZ
  • Local time:02:14 AM

Posted 18 March 2006 - 10:34 PM

Thanks Herk.
I'd sorta guessed that was what was happening but it is nice to know. My 512MB seems to handle everything I do even tho' only 448MB is recognised, but the best thing is probably bite the bullet and put 2x512 sticks in when I can afford it. Cheers

rowal5555 (Rob )                                                             

Avid supporter of Bleeping Computer's
Team 38444

You can help find a cure


 


#4 Darren De Wilde

Darren De Wilde

  • Members
  • 208 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Howell, NJ
  • Local time:09:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:33 AM

Dear Rowal,

Dont forget that if you have on-board video, Windows also allocates your memory to support graphics, which is why you may not be seeing what you expect.

If thats not the case you can run memory tests to determine if you have faulty memory, although I very much doubt that is the case.

Darren De Wilde

#5 rowal5555

rowal5555

    Just enough info to be armed & dangerous...

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2,644 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Kilda, Dunedin. South Island. NZ
  • Local time:02:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 01:01 AM

Thanks Darren. I've never done a memory test. What's involved in this?

#6 jgweed

jgweed

  • Staff Emeritus
  • 28,473 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago, Il.
  • Local time:08:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 10:54 AM

One way to increase system resources is to delete any unneeded applications that launch on boot such as IMs, media players, and Office applications; all of these take a small amount of resources just sitting around tapping their fingers until you want to use them.
Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#7 Darren De Wilde

Darren De Wilde

  • Members
  • 208 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Howell, NJ
  • Local time:09:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:02 PM

Hey there,

To be quite honest with you, I think if you had faulty memory you would have seen much more bizarre and irritating behavior. If you still want to run a memory test for peace of mind you can do.

You must first download memtest or another reccommended program that may appear in replies after this one. >>>Memtest- choose version 3.2 of memtest and download - You will need an iso file for bootable CD's or you can make a floppy bootable disk. Both will start when you reboot with the disk inserted and BIOS settings adjusted so your floppy or CD ROM is the first device that is read when the computer boots.

If your using a CD to make bootable, you will need a burner that can burn ISO image files (such as Nero ROM Burning or Roxio). There are other burning software packages but they escape my mind right now (I'm positive someone will post them after me)..

Once you have your disc ready with ISO image, insert into the appropriate drive and restart the computer. The program should load and the memory check will commence. It can take some time for the test to complete so have your coffee maker set up too..:-)

CD's: Note that simply copying or moving the file to disk will not make it bootable. You must use an ISO burner to correctly burn the image and make it bootable.

If any probs are found the program will make it known to you.

If you need any other assistance with any of the above steps or procedures dont hesitate to reply back.

Good luck..
Darren De Wilde :thumbsup:

Edited by Darren De Wilde, 19 March 2006 - 12:03 PM.


#8 Darren De Wilde

Darren De Wilde

  • Members
  • 208 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Howell, NJ
  • Local time:09:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:08 PM

One way to increase system resources is to delete any unneeded applications that launch on boot such as IMs, media players, and Office applications; all of these take a small amount of resources just sitting around tapping their fingers until you want to use them.
Regards,
John


Can this be achieved by simply removing applications from the start-up menu under Start>Program Files>Start-Up
or must it be done using msconfig under Start>Run>msconfig..I assume that removing them from the start-up tab in msconfig would mean that the device will not load at all on start-up.

#9 jgweed

jgweed

  • Staff Emeritus
  • 28,473 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago, Il.
  • Local time:08:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:18 PM

Darren, my own preference is to use an application to manage startups. For example, Spybot has a startup manager in its Tools section, and there are many others that members use (several are, I think mentioned in the list of free applications).
Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#10 Darren De Wilde

Darren De Wilde

  • Members
  • 208 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Howell, NJ
  • Local time:09:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:20 PM

Thanks John,

I'll have a browse. Also, do you know of any sites to download fonts and icons that are 99.999% safe?

Thanks as always.

#11 Enthusiast

Enthusiast

  • Members
  • 5,898 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Florida, USA
  • Local time:08:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:21 PM

Using these so called memory managers actually defeat Windows XP processes which use unused RAM at any given point in time for necessary Windows operating system maintenance processes when it is not being used by legitimate open aps.

If you have aps (usually poorly written freebie code, the same type of code that isn't compliant to Microsoft's established criteria and therefore is for the most part responsible for opening exploits) that leak or retain memory when closed - get rid of them!

From Fred Langa:

"Fred, [name of utility] saves my butt---I get my resources down to 5% and then it kicks in and restores them to 50%..."

Invariably, when I check it out, I discover the reader is talking about his or her pool of system RAM, and not what's usually meant by "System Resources." As is explained in Part One (mentioned above) System Resources in Windows usually means two very specific memory areas: User Resources and GDI (Graphics Device Interface ) Resources. When these memory areas are exhausted, you can get crashes or other weirdness.

General RAM is a whole 'nother thing. Sometimes, some people think that idle, unused RAM is the same thing as available System Resources. It's not; they're very different things. What's more, they're conceptually opposite in use: You want your System Resources to be used as LITTLE as possible, but you want your RAM to be used as MUCH as possible! (I'll explain this in more detail later.)

Thus, some people who use tools to "open up a hole in RAM" are often getting the opposite effect of what they want: They think they're freeing System Resources, but all they're doing is bogging their systems down! Their confusion is understandable because of the way the, um, less polished memory tools toss around the term "System Resources:" The tools *may* be useful for recovering leaked general memory (which usually is a minor problem at worst), but they make it sound like they attack the much more serious problem of User and GDI leaks. Again: They do not.

In fact, the better memory-management tools explicitly state that they do nothing---nada, zip, zero, zilch--- about User and GDI Resources or any memory leaks therein. These apps *may* (and that's a huge qualifier) help with a completely different and less significant kind of memory leak, but that's a separate issue from the very serious issue of User and GDI System Resource leaks.
http://www.langa.com/newsletters/2000/2000-06-01.htm

By the way, there is a utility for startup menu management that I use which is easier to use than most others because it tells you intelligeably what you are removing from the startup menu - what programs the dlls are connected with - and doesn't default to safe mode like msconfig does.
It is called Startup Inspector -
http://www.windowsstartup.com/

Its companion ap - Startup Monitor will alert you whenever anything tries to add itself to your startup menu and require your approval.
Also on the page is a Startup Programs Knowledge Base in which you can type an ap in question to find out what it is and what it is connected to.

Edited by Enthusiast, 19 March 2006 - 12:47 PM.


#12 River_Rat

River_Rat

  • Members
  • 773 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SW Oklahoma - USA
  • Local time:08:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 12:43 PM

Windows XP is very stable & was designed to be very efficient in managing the memory by itself, & I might add does a very good job of it.
Memory Managers are nothing but crapware and offer a user some kind of self security. All they do is force programs out of the RAM & into the virtual memory which in turn actually slows your computer down. Unused RAM is waisted RAM.

Virtual Memory in Windows XP
http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.htm

#13 rowal5555

rowal5555

    Just enough info to be armed & dangerous...

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2,644 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St Kilda, Dunedin. South Island. NZ
  • Local time:02:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 04:53 PM

Thank you all for the above info. At the moment, I'm not sure if I am enlightened or more confused. I did read a long time ago, that XP with more than 512MB was very efficient at managing itself. The message I am getting is that programs such as FreeRAMXP are not desirable or necessary, or both. Excellent, one less for my startup pile. Thank you all again.

rowal5555 (Rob )                                                             

Avid supporter of Bleeping Computer's
Team 38444

You can help find a cure


 


#14 jgweed

jgweed

  • Staff Emeritus
  • 28,473 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago, Il.
  • Local time:08:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 07:24 PM

RE: download fonts and icons.
No. I don't usually find the need to download these, so I could not recommend any site that was completely safe.
Sorry,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#15 Enthusiast

Enthusiast

  • Members
  • 5,898 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Florida, USA
  • Local time:08:14 AM

Posted 19 March 2006 - 07:30 PM

Here are some you can get from Microsoft:
http://www.microsoft.com/typography/fonts/default.aspx




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users