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Disk Partition


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Israa

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 10:46 AM

So I got my laptop 2 years ago, not new anymore yeah, but ever since I got it, it only had one disk c:/ .. I was wondering If I can still do disk partition? and If I can how? and does it cause the loss of files I already have? Thanks!

Edited by hamluis, 26 October 2012 - 01:37 PM.
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#2 MDTechService

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:34 PM

Generally, the answer is no. When Windows is installed, it doesn't typically leave unallocated/free space unless you specifically tell it to do so. You can however shrink the drive to free up space that you are not using on the primary partition. You can do this via the Disk Management utility or through the diskpart utility in command prompt.

Disk Management instructions:
Find the disk you would like to shrink (should be disk 0 in your case).
Right click, select "shrink volume". Allow the query to run for a couple minutes.
Select the amount of space you would like to shrink the volume by. Click shrink.


Command Prompt instructions:
Run command prompt (cmd.exe) as administrator
diskpart (enter)
list volume (enter)
select volume <volumeNumber>
shrink [desired=<desiredsizeMB>] [minimum=<minimumSizeMB>]

Desired is the size you would like the partition containing Windows shrunk to, in megabytes. Ie, 50GB would be 50000. Generally, I don't shrink it to more than used space + 10% (if you are using 30GB, this would be 33GB).

Once all this is done, you should have unallocated space showing on that disk. I will post another reply with instructions for partitioning the new space. Shrinking isn't a destructive process, however it will limit the ability to install new programs and save data on the current partition.

Edited by MDTechService, 07 October 2012 - 08:36 PM.

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#3 MDTechService

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:49 PM

Once you have the unallocated space, you can choose to create your volume/partition either in disk management or command prompt.

Disk Management instructions - if you've done this before, it should be an easy review.

Right click on the unallocated space, select "new simple volume".
Click next, specify the volume size in MB, click next.
Assign the volume any letter not in current use, or you can mount it in an NTFS folder.
Format it, typically in NTFS with default unit size. Name it what you want.
Review selections, click finish.

Command Prompt instructions
Run command prompt as administrator
diskpart
list disk
select disk n (should be 0 in your case)
create partition primary size=[i]n[/i] (size in MB, should be equal or slightly less than the size you shrank the volume by)
assign letter=<a-z, not in use>    This will prompt you to format the disk. You can follow the Windows prompts or use diskpart
select disk n
list volume
select volume <the one you created>
format fs=NTFS label="<whatever you want>" quick compress   These are general options that will suit most users fine
Once you have done this, a window should pop up indicating Windows has detected a new volume (the one you just partitioned and formatted).

Edited by MDTechService, 07 October 2012 - 08:50 PM.

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#4 hamluis

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 01:36 PM

<<So I got my laptop 2 years ago, not new anymore yeah, but ever since I got it, it only had one disk c:/ .. I was wondering If I can still do disk partition? and If I can how? and does it cause the loss of files I already have? Thanks!>>

Sure...you can split the one partition into smaller partitions, using any number of programs for partitioning...assuming that there is free space available on the existing partition.

One such...EASEUS Partition Master Home Edition freeware. - http://www.partition-tool.com/personal.htm . Read the instructions to use this or any other program that you choose.

Please Publish a Snapshot using Speccy - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic323892.html/page__p__1797792#entry1797792 .

Louis

#5 rotor123

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Posted 26 October 2012 - 02:54 PM

Hi

Also do not forget to do a full backup first, just in case things go pear shaped. Anytime you change the partition tables there is a risk.

It is usually a risk free process, 99.9% of the time. That other .01% makes you wish you had backed up.

Did you make the recovery disk set? There is a chance that changing the partition tables could break the Recovery function and if you do not have the disks...........

Good Luck
Roger

Edited by rotor123, 26 October 2012 - 02:54 PM.

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