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Limit CPU when transferring files.


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#1 Bezukhov

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Posted 23 September 2012 - 02:11 PM

I am in the process of backing up around 500 Gbs of files from an internal drive to an external one. One thing that I noticed is that the transfers eat up a lot of my CPU, almost 100% of it. I went and installed cpulimiter but I can't for the life of me figure out the name of the process responsible. None of them in the system monitor is showing a lot of CPU use, except for (and rather ironic) the system monitor itself.
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#2 attak sekwence

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 04:42 AM

About a month late but I would just go ahead and not worry about limiting the CPU. All it will do is hinder your ability to use your computer for the time being. Think of it this way when someone overclocks a PC to check if it is stable we leave it running at 100% for up to days on end. And that is with a system running faster then what is designed for, producing more heat and using more voltage. If all your settings are stock I wouldn't worry about it maybe unless it is a laptop that runs particularly hot for one reason or another (mine does) in which case you may want to break up the load a bit. For example transfer 100 gigs at a time then give it a rest doing some normal computing or just idling to cool down for awhile. Like I said I know I'm late but I hope I helped.

#3 Dethadder

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:39 PM

I'm also super late.. but, You can also use the TOP command and use 'r' to renice a poc. If you do the backup often you can run a CRON job that has a 'backup script' running at night time so you don't have to kick it off.

#4 stiltskin

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 07:13 PM

If you use a script:

nice -n 19 <scriptname>

If you're doing it graphically:

nice -n 19 <graphical_program>

Since it's a backup program, it may require root acccess. Just modify it like so:

nice -n 19 sudo <command>

Or maybe it's the following. I forget just now:

sudo nice -n 19 <command>

You didn't say what you're using. But if the desktop is Gnome or something else with a menu editor, you can go to the menu item and edit the command to put the 'nice -n 19' part ikn front of the command that gets run.

#5 Dethadder

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:08 PM

If you use a script:

nice -n 19 <scriptname>

If you're doing it graphically:

nice -n 19 <graphical_program>

Since it's a backup program, it may require root acccess. Just modify it like so:

nice -n 19 sudo <command>

Or maybe it's the following. I forget just now:

sudo nice -n 19 <command>

You didn't say what you're using. But if the desktop is Gnome or something else with a menu editor, you can go to the menu item and edit the command to put the 'nice -n 19' part ikn front of the command that gets run.



Vey true however at the ‘nice’ level of 19, it might take way too long for the file transfer to complete. It’s almost like telling the transfer to halt. Again, if you have a large task to run id set it up on a CRON job.



What do you think siltskin? Am I beating a dead horse?

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#6 stiltskin

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:43 PM

I use nice -n 19 for a whole lot of stuff and rarely has the speed been a problem. If I'm using the machine I'm not bothered by whatever it's doing in the background. And if the machine is otherwise idle, the speed picks up considerably.

I failed to mention rsync, too. If it's one-for-one backup up, rsync is a great tool. Just be sure not to mix up source and target directories or you may overwrite new with old. Also be careful about using --delete and disable it if you change drives or you may wipe out a backup that you'll need for restoring things before you can get to the restore (the voice of experience :woot: ).

I back up 85G of music once a week with rsync. I make changes in the source directory constantly. Yet the update to the destination only takes a few minutes. Using nice -n 19 to do it, too.

I'd definitely do backups via a cron task unless you're using a graphical program and a manual method to do it. (If you're using that, I'd suggest looking into cron and scripting to handle it for you, but it's your business if you want to do it another way.) I still always use nice -n 19 to do them when I set up that way. I'm usually asleep when they run. However, I've been awake a few times and I both wasn't bothered by the process and the process didn't take an inordinate amount of time to complete.




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