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POST-like beeps while in Windows - sudden shutdown


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#1 Falneth

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 03:49 PM

I have just recently built this computer from all new parts. It has been running fine for over 2 months steadily but suddenly the motherboard has been giving me POST-like beeps while in Windows. When I turn it on, I get no beeps during the POST. I have rebooted the computer and still got no beeps during POST but within two minutes of getting into Windows, I get a long beep, a short beep, then a continuous beep, during which my computer powers off. This has happened on two separate occasions. I'm wondering if the processor could be overheating. Here's why I think that: When I installed the CPU heatsink onto the motherboard, the metal clip that goes over the heatsink to fasten to the plastic on either side of the processor does not remain clipped to the motherboard. It's like the piece of metal is too long to hold the heatsink and fan securely on the processor. I've noticed that the heatsink is able to be slightly turned from side to side while it's hooked to the motherboard.

Here's my setup:

Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-990XA-UD3 AM3+ AMD 990X SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard
CPU: AMD FX-6100 Zambezi 3.3GHz Socket AM3+ 95W Six-Core Desktop Processor FD6100WMGUSBX
RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 14900) Desktop Memory Model F3-14900CL9D-8GBXL
Graphics Card: EVGA 01G-P3-1464-KR GeForce GTX 560 SE (Fermi) 1GB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
Power Supply: LEPA G700-MA 700W SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
Hard Drive 1: Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 1TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
Hard Drive 2: Seagate 250GB SATA
Hard Drive 3: Seagate 500GB SATA
Optical Drive: ASUS 24X DVD Burner - Bulk 24X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 12X DVD+R DL 24X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM Black SATA Model DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS
Operating System: Windows 7 SP1 - 64 Bit

I bought all these parts (with the exception of the 500 GB and 250 GB Hard drives) brand new from Newegg. These two used hard drives are from a previous computer setup and I am reusing them on this setup.

Edited by Falneth, 20 September 2012 - 03:50 PM.


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#2 ph7ryan

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 04:10 PM

The first thing that comes to my mind without even reading your post would be temperature related. Quickly glancing over your post I see that you have had problems with the heatsink. That's a very big issue, not something you want to brush off lightly. If you can't figure out how to operate the stock heat sink, invest in a nice aftermarket one. I have an Antec Kuhler 620 I think the number is, but basically its a self contained water cooling kit with the pump and reservoir and radiator all in one small package and is made to only cool the CPU. Works great, is very, VERY quiet, and my temps stay rather low which is great for efficiency and longevity of the part.

I have a carpc setup that does roughly the same thing when it is an extremely hot day, the computer shuts down and then lets out a very clear warning beep of overheating. The problem is that it is hooked up to a 75w x 4 Channel amplifier and almost blows my ear drums out!

Before you go out buying anything new though, download Core Temp and run it. I believe there's a way to have it log your temps, but for AMD processors, you really don't wanna go above 60 degrees, which is very easy to do with 6 cores a faulty heat sink. Also, be sure you are using thermal paste, many installers see this as optional, but I believe it to be mandatory. Not too much, just about the size of a pea, and use a business card of someone you don't like and try to keep a constant pressure as you smear it evenly along the top. Basically you are making a highly heat conductive layer that will make due with any microscopic imperfections on both the heat sink and the top of the processor. Sure they may be microscopic points of heat buildup if you don't use it, but taking a calculus class will help you understand that it doesn't take too many of those infinitesimally small points can add up to some serious heat buildup. Not a good thing for something that costs as much as it does. So download core temp, figure out what the temps that you are getting are, and then if they seem pretty high, invest in a nicer than stock heat-sink and fan. You'll be surprised at the amount it can drop your temps and the audible level of your case.

#3 Falneth

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 05:46 PM

The first thing that comes to my mind without even reading your post would be temperature related. Quickly glancing over your post I see that you have had problems with the heatsink. That's a very big issue, not something you want to brush off lightly. If you can't figure out how to operate the stock heat sink, invest in a nice aftermarket one.


I took my heatsink and motherboard to a local pc shop who gives free estimates. He looked at it and showed me how to lock the heatsink to the motherboard. Turns out that the lever on the side that I could not figure out what it was for is actually used to lock the heatsink down. I added a little thermal paste since there was lots of gaps in what was originally on the heatsink due to it moving around. I reassembled my computer and am currently running a memory test on one of the 4GB RAM sticks.

A.A.S in Computer and Network Support from Crowder College


#4 ph7ryan

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 07:15 PM

The mem test definitely won't hurt, but I think you are really going to be addressing the problem more by looking at the core temperatures. Also, try reading the user manual of your motherboard, theres usually a section on "trouble codes" which is actually what the beeping you are describing is called. Sometimes they tell you about the overheating one, sometimes they don't, but if it almost sounds like an alarm, I'm 95% positive that that's what's wrong with your system.

#5 Falneth

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 10:25 PM

Also, try reading the user manual of your motherboard, theres usually a section on "trouble codes" which is actually what the beeping you are describing is called. Sometimes they tell you about the overheating one, sometimes they don't, but if it almost sounds like an alarm, I'm 95% positive that that's what's wrong with your system.


I did look at the manual for my motherboard. It stated that if received during the POST, 1 long beep followed by 1 short beep meant "Memory or Motherboard Error". It did not give much other details besides other error codes, which I was not getting. Btw, I am writing this response ON the computer that was having the issue. When I got it back up and running, I looked at the BIOS to see where the alarm was set at. According to Gigabyte (I asked them about the computer shutting suddenly down as well), they said the processor should not go above 60 degrees Celsius. The BIOS was configured (not by me) to hit the alarm when the processor hit 90 degrees Celsius. I lowered it to match what the motherboard manufacturer told me. They also told me the processor was likely overheating due to the heatsink not being fully secured. When I put the heatsink back on my motherboard, I added new thermal paste AND fully secured it to the motherboard with a lever that I had previously not used that is attached to the heatsink. So far it seems to be working well.

A.A.S in Computer and Network Support from Crowder College


#6 ph7ryan

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 10:32 PM

Wow, your processor was reaching 90C! Lucky you didn't burn that sucker out.

Anyways, I'm fairly certain that was your issue and I'm glad you were able to get it worked out.

#7 Falneth

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 10:34 PM

Yea no joke. I got extremely lucky with my processor. Thanks for your help. I'm going to download that tool and keep it handy.

A.A.S in Computer and Network Support from Crowder College


#8 coxchris

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 12:17 AM

Very lucky, I got very lucky to I didn't have bend pins on mine. Didn't lock it in securely

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#9 Falneth

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:50 AM

Yesterday my computer started doing the beeps again. I immediately downloaded the Core Temp program. As I sit here watching it, it is giving me a short beep every time my CPU's temp spikes to at least 48°C. The temperature is fluctuating from 20°C to the current max of 52°C. I just booted my computer up this morning to try to figure out what is going on. I currently have 70 processes (according to task manager) running and that is after I started windows. The load on the cores of my processor is very low (0% - 20% / core). I don't understand why the temperature is fluctuating this much. It runs at 22°C for about 5 minutes then will start heating up to 35°-48°C for about 5 minutes and goes back down to 22°C.

I've checked the BIOS settings for the CPU temperature warnings and it is set to alarm if the CPU hits 70°C.

Any ideas why it is setting off an alarm at 48°C?

Edited by Falneth, 28 January 2013 - 03:25 PM.

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#10 Falneth

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:41 PM

I think the Core Temp program actually reads the CPU temp 12-14 C lower than it actually is. I installed Moo0 System Monitor to get a second opinion and it is reading the CPU 12-14 C higher than Core Temp does. I think that the BIOS is set to alarm when the CPU temp hits 60C and when Core Temp reads it at 47-48 C, it actually is at or above the 60C warning mark which is why it is sounding only during those heat spikes. Also, during boot-up at the BIOS, a CPU should be under a smaller load than when running an Operating System. I say that since I've looked at the CPU temp in the BIOS on a fresh boot after my computer was turned off overnight and the BIOS reads the CPU temp at 42-43C.

I also think that software cannot get a full read on CPU temps but rather only can get a general idea of the temperature of a CPU. So I suspect that when my computer turns on after being off for several hours and reads 42C in the BIOS, that it will run no lower than that when running the OS and will actually be running in the 50-60C range depending on the load.

Any thoughts on my theory?

A.A.S in Computer and Network Support from Crowder College


#11 hamluis

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:41 AM

Your BIOS CPU temp reading...is accurate, if you take a look at it and doubt 3d-party software.

Louis




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