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Not getting advertised speeds


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#1 evti

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 09:53 PM

My internet is cable at advertised speed of 28 Mbps download, 1 Mbps upload. Most of the time I get anywhere from 10-14, depending on whether it is peak hours (since they throttle during peak time, which is 7pm-4am). Nonetheless, I should be getting at least 18 Mbps, but I do not. I did a speed test with a wired device and a wireless device, and the wireless one was actually higher (but they were both basically around 10 Mbps). I have tweaked my router settings the best I know how, but I am not sure what else to do. Could it be the ISPs fault, or would it be something they couldn't do anything about? Would calling them be a waste of time? I am using a Motorola SB2160, and I am using two routers. One is a Linksys WRT400N in wireless bridge mode with DD-WRT installed on it, and the other is a D-Link DIR-657 with the wireless turned off. The D-Link is the one that is responsible for the DHCP, and is the one plugged into the modem.

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#2 jhayz

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:41 PM

Most likely because wireless bridging cuts the bandwith into halves as documented on DD-WRT wiki page.

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#3 evti

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 09:36 PM

Most likely because wireless bridging cuts the bandwith into halves as documented on DD-WRT wiki page.


The thing is that even if I plug directly into the modem, I still only get 14 Mbps on peak hours

#4 NpaMA

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 07:21 PM

Verify that the 28mb/s is the sustainable speed and not some "burst" technology. It's pretty common for cable providers to allow 15mb/s with bursts to 30mb/s or so. Also, 1mb/s upload on a 28mb/s connection? Seriously? (not doubting you, that just has to be worst ratio I've ever seen).

If you really should be 28mb/s, then contact your ISP. But be prepared to connect directly to their modem and not go through any router.

#5 evti

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 03:10 PM

Verify that the 28mb/s is the sustainable speed and not some "burst" technology. It's pretty common for cable providers to allow 15mb/s with bursts to 30mb/s or so.


If you really should be 28mb/s, then contact your ISP. But be prepared to connect directly to their modem and not go through any router.


I know I won't get 28 through my router, and I don't expect to get exactly 28. I expect to get around 20 or so though. Getting half of advertised speeds is a bit of a rip off though. And there is nothing about "burst" speeds anywhere on their page or support forums. Other people report speeds that are at least near what they are paying for. So I am getting much less than other people who have the same package are getting.

Also, 1mb/s upload on a 28mb/s connection? Seriously?


I know it's kind of dumb, but I swear this is it. I don't know why it's like that, but I hope they up it sometime in the future.

#6 NpaMA

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 12:18 AM

Through a router via Cat5, you should easily be able to pull your max line speed. Over wireless, I would expect you to still be around 20mb/s.

All I can recommend now is to contact your internet provider.

PS: If you're paying for 28mb/s, do not accept anything lower then 25-26mb/s.

#7 evti

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 04:50 PM

Through a router via Cat5, you should easily be able to pull your max line speed. Over wireless, I would expect you to still be around 20mb/s.

All I can recommend now is to contact your internet provider.

PS: If you're paying for 28mb/s, do not accept anything lower then 25-26mb/s.


Okay, thanks! I really hope they don't give me any excuses, since a lot of providers seem to be very defensive about their speeds. I guess they just hope no one will notice, and brush people off when they complain?




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