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reset cox IP


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#1 mr2005

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 11:33 PM

Hi all,

I am trying to get a new COX Ip address.

My set up is windows 7. I have a cox cable modem that runs to a netgear wifi router then to my pc.

I have tried cox's instructions OF:

To view your IP address:
Type ipconfig and press Enter. You will see the numbers and dots that represent your address.
To release your IP address:
Type ipconfig/release and press Enter
To renew your IP address:
Type ipconfig/renew and press Enter

Non of this worked.

When i check with one of the online 'whats my ip" websites, they continue to come up with the same IP address.

I have also tried to unplug my cable modem for a few hours and that also did not give me a new IP address.


anyone know how to do this?

Much thanks for all help!!!

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#2 noknojon

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 01:24 AM

For Phoenix:
Name: ns1.ph.cox.net
Address: 68.2.16.30
Name: ns2.ph.cox.net
Address: 68.2.16.25
Administrative ContactCommunications, Cox ATTN COX.NET care of Network Solutions
PO Box 459
Drums, PA 18222
US

Call them and complain. There seems to be many problwms listed if you look on Google -
Telephone: 570-708-8780
Email: ????????????

#3 Romeo29

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 10:18 AM

Just switch off the router and then switch it on. If you are using a dynamic IP address based plan, then it would get you a new IP.

#4 mr2005

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 10:53 AM

i have tried switching the modem off and it doesnt work. even leaving it off overnight didn'T give me a new IP.

#5 Romeo29

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 12:43 PM

Then you have either a static IP connection or your ISP is assigning you static IP address based on your hardware MAC address (unique for every router).
You can find out is by using a different router which is a costly way to find this. Or you can simply call them and ask.

#6 mr2005

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 02:08 AM

i spoke with cox, the informed me the IPs are on a 24 hour lease and I need to unplug the cable modem for 24 hours. I did that and still have the same IP. any other suggestions.

#7 ddeerrff

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 04:24 PM

I am trying to get a new COX Ip address.


Why? You can unplug the modem (make sure it's the modem, not the router) for an extended period of time - then plug it back in. The system head end will issue an IP. If nothing has changed in the system - i.e. the system has not given your old IP to a new subscriber or someone else - then it may just issue you the same IP again.

If there really is some reasonable reason you need a different IP, you may be able to get COX tech support to force a change. But you will need to get to a higher level of tech support than your initial phone call gets you.
Derfram
~~~~~~

#8 cheawick

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 10:26 PM

I may be a newbie IT guy, but disconnecting anything is bad for business in terms of waiting for re-establishment of systems, but you do have some options to release and request a new IP from a provider. I know this is an old post, but it kinda irks me that folk are happy to wait for a long period of time so that something happens... Well, lets change that thought path shall we.

 

According to the original post concerning Cox advice to get a new IP: that will only release and update their addressing if you DO NOT have anything but a cable modem on your end. If you are going from modem to a router then things become complicated. You will have to take care of things on the modem and the router. Modems and routers are kinda a hybrid technology these days. They can play on the first three levels of the OSI format, I know I will not be able to clear up these levels in a simple statement. So for now let me address the issue at hand, with the thought this IP refresh request is based on a baseline Cox broadband internet connection with a possible wireless router switch that has four physical ports.

 

I will pause here and wait for discussion, obviously there is no reason for me to continue if there is no interest of this topic any longer.



#9 mmasterson91

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 03:47 AM

(cheawick), I would like you to continue your analysis. It seems it would be of great help to me now, and in the future. Hopefully you will get a notification for this forum. Thanks.

#10 cheawick

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 10:27 PM

Wow, damn near two years later someone shows interest. I'm not downing you mmasterson91, but please realize that so much time has passed I'll have to start from scratch in researching this. Also all the notes I had (well my whole hard drive) got destroyed by a botched partition resizing attempt, in fact shortly shortly after making that post is when I made the fatal mistake that killed the drive. I'll spare you such sorrow, when working with a multi OS system, only perform partitioning operations on the initial root system otherwise the secondary OS will overwrite the partition table and leave it unreadable once you change to another OS.

 

Now with out researching anything and perhaps allow you to start your own research here's what comes to mind currently. Folk forget that the router or switch is not the direct gateway that needs to be reset, the problem is that normally we lose the ability to communicate with the real gateway, which is the modem, overtime. If you want to understand what I'm talking about do a trace route directly to your Cox provider website and you'll quickly see that this reset ain't gonna be a simple thing.

 

Here is a copy of the route I follow and you'll note I did NOT hit the actual Cox addressing site as they block ping requests.

 

Tsygen:~ lazerback$ traceroute

Version 1.4a12+Darwin

Usage: traceroute [-adDeFInrSvx] [-A as_server] [-f first_ttl] [-g gateway] [-i iface]

[-M first_ttl] [-m max_ttl] [-p port] [-P proto] [-q nqueries] [-s src_addr]

[-t tos] [-w waittime] [-z pausemsecs] host [packetlen]

Tsygen:~ lazerback$ traceroute www.cox.com

traceroute to www.cox.com (68.99.123.161), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets

 1  192.168.1.1 (192.168.1.1)  2.552 ms  1.282 ms  1.126 ms

 2  10.132.24.1 (10.132.24.1)  9.221 ms  11.627 ms  9.875 ms

 3  68.11.14.114 (68.11.14.114)  10.516 ms  16.970 ms  11.404 ms

 4  68.11.14.114 (68.11.14.114)  10.220 ms  8.249 ms  9.537 ms

 5  dukedsrj02-ae4.0.rd.at.cox.net (68.1.1.123)  33.358 ms  35.564 ms  34.869 ms

 6  68.1.15.238 (68.1.15.238)  34.838 ms  36.989 ms  38.642 ms

 7  * * *

 8  * * *

 9  * * *

^C

 
I guess I should note that I'm using Mac OS X on this computer, on other computers I also use Windows 7, 8.1, Pre-release Windows 10, and Ubuntu Linux.
 
What you can see here is that a user would have to convince at a minimum 6 different routers to reset their DNS and IP tables and you only have access to one (as long as you kept all your documentation and any configuration software it came with).
 
Since it's Friday I'll rest here to let you have a looksee and give you a chance to ask early questions. I hope this gets ya thinking! 
 
EDIT: To be fair that really doesn't show the list of all the gateways and routers that would have to be reset in order to gain a new IP. Have a look at the following trace route to Google.
 
 
Tsygen:~ lazerback$ traceroute www.google.com

traceroute to www.google.com (216.58.216.4), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets

 1  192.168.1.1 (192.168.1.1)  1.616 ms  1.266 ms  1.186 ms

 2  10.132.24.1 (10.132.24.1)  10.709 ms  9.472 ms  9.921 ms

 3  68.11.14.112 (68.11.14.112)  10.796 ms  10.044 ms  10.685 ms

 4  68.11.14.112 (68.11.14.112)  9.024 ms  12.068 ms  9.473 ms

 5  dalsbprj02-ae2.0.rd.dl.cox.net (68.1.2.121)  34.042 ms  50.023 ms  25.110 ms

 6  72.14.212.237 (72.14.212.237)  20.400 ms  21.589 ms  21.829 ms

 7  72.14.233.85 (72.14.233.85)  22.989 ms

    72.14.233.77 (72.14.233.77)  27.011 ms

    72.14.233.85 (72.14.233.85)  21.717 ms

 8  64.233.175.148 (64.233.175.148)  56.542 ms

    66.249.95.198 (66.249.95.198)  57.296 ms  57.030 ms

 9  209.85.254.117 (209.85.254.117)  55.376 ms

    66.249.95.89 (66.249.95.89)  61.553 ms

    209.85.254.119 (209.85.254.119)  57.493 ms

10  64.233.175.151 (64.233.175.151)  71.899 ms  54.590 ms

    64.233.174.189 (64.233.174.189)  56.159 ms

11  209.85.142.91 (209.85.142.91)  55.163 ms  61.380 ms  55.505 ms

12  lax02s21-in-f4.1e100.net (216.58.216.4)  57.675 ms  57.627 ms  55.710 ms

 

Oh, just ran across an interesting link while I was trying to ensure I was discerning the line item paths above and while I have not read it entirely (getting tired, almost midnight) I found it interesting enough to share: https://www.whatismyip.com/how-to-change-your-ip-address/

 

G'night mon, we'll have another go at this tomorrow or whenever.


Edited by cheawick, 03 April 2015 - 11:38 PM.


#11 cheawick

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 01:16 AM

Some of the higher end IP adds had me perplexed and I had to follow my curiosity, traditionally the main Google server is listed as a hard (static) IP of 5.5.5.5 (which is an IPv4 listing), however it appears they are now utilizing dynamic IPv6 listing and if you don't click on the link I'm providing at this very moment I'm posting it yer probably gonna get something else than Google:http://www.speedguide.net/ip/209.85.254.119

 

That link actually looks like a pretty useful site that I never encountered before...

 

An additional note, should you really be concerned about your TCP/IP and UDP traffic you need to download Wireshark, it's a free network analysis tool, and if yer using an Windows system you can actually configure it to monitor router traffic and possibly direct gateway traffic.

 

Thanks for making me think, I haven't had a decent mental challenge since I messed up my knees and lost my mechanic job back in 2011.


Edited by cheawick, 04 April 2015 - 01:26 AM.


#12 cheawick

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 12:35 AM

Wow, I must have been deliriously tired when posting that last one and sadly by the time I got here again I'm pretty pooped out. 

 

I can validate that Wireshark is a super tool for understanding all data traffic as long as you actually record samples of activity to compare with a freshly recorded sample.

 

Again however, it appears that this will probably be the end of this thread, another restart of a conversation has come to no conclusion. 

 

FYI to everyone here, give feedback PLEASE!!!

 

When I get no response I ask myself why the heck I'm providing to folk on the internet advice for free. Seriously, think about it.



#13 ActualNetworkingGuy

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 07:48 PM

Cheawick, not to bring you down or be mean, but almost nothing you have said is correct. And spreading false information is worse than being silent in my opinion. 
 

Getting a new "internet facing" IP address does not concern your router at all. Modems don't have IP addresses. And the modem only operates on the physical(1st) layer of the OSI model while the router is on layer 3. These are basic networking facts.

 

The traceroute simply returns all of the layer 3 networking "hops" that your packets go through to reach their destination. They care nothing about your IP address and don't store it in their IP tables, such that they prevent you from changing your IP. 

Also, we aren't talking about DNS at all, so why would anyone clear their DNS? And I'd wager that most of these devices listed in the traceroute rely on an actual DNS server for their DNS needs.

 

http://www.speedguide.net/ip/209.85.254.119  That is still an IPv4 address. 
This is an example of IPv6: 1200:0000:AB00:1234:0000:2552:7777:1313
And nothing about IPv4 or IPv6 is static or dynamic. Both protocols utilize static and dynamic addressing. 


Resetting your IP is as simple or as difficult as your ISP makes it. But it's not a complex feat technologically. Your router just gets a new one. Simple as that. Whether you have the ability to change it yourself, you request a new one, your ISP uses DHCP to allocate them as they're requested, or the IP is tied to the modem's MAC address. But changing it is simple, easy, and completely voluntary. 

As soon as you have a new IP address, all requests go out like normal and everyone responds to your web requests like you're a new person. Because they don't care who you are/were. Their job is to serve content to whoever requests it. 


Edited by ActualNetworkingGuy, 01 March 2018 - 07:52 PM.





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