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Power Issue? Computer randomly turns off


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#1 shiftahhh

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 06:54 PM

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/elixIe55vYRTLiAgNfHAZK5

My computer will randomly shut off and will not turn back on. Pressing the power button after it has shut off sometimes will have it turn back on for a few seconds (less than 5sec). Pressing the power button again generally makes it turn back on for even less time or not at all. The only thing that seems to fix the problem is disconnecting the power connector from the motherboard and then waiting a few seconds and plugging it back in. I would say this works about 50% of the time, otherwise it will power on for a few seconds and turn off again. If it does stay on then the computer runs fine for a random amount of time (hours/days/weeks...it really is random).

I am not always on the computer when it turns off. Many times I will wake up and the computer has turned off during the night. Other times it will shut off when I am using it. Again, very random.

This problem has been coming and going for about 6 months. Originally I noticed the CPU fan was not running so I went out and bought a new decent quality heat sink and fan to replace the stock one. That did not seem to fix the problem. Next, I thought it was something to do with my computer not being wired properly since I accidentally had my primary hard-drive running through some sort of additional card that gives me extra SATA connectors (don't remember the official name). After switching it to plug directly into the motherboard the problem went away for approximately 2 months, only to resurface this past week.

I don't believe it is a temperature issue, I have checked Speedfan sporadically and the temperatures on everything seem normal. Only the GPU temperature is labeled as "hot" sometimes.

I know my way around a computer alright, but I don't claim to be any sort of expert. I was going to go ahead and just replace the Power Supply but it seems like an odd problem, and having to remove the Motherboard power to fix it makes me think it might be something other than the Power Supply. Any clue as to what might be causing this? Should I go ahead and replace the Power Supply to see if that was the culprit?

Thanks for any help with this!

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#2 The_Outkast

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:07 PM

Before buying anything, you might want to take a quick look at all of the capacitors on your motherboard and make sure none of them are bulging or have burst.

#3 ranchhand_

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:14 PM

Hello Shiftahhh, sorry to hear of your problems. You said:

I went out and bought a new decent quality heat sink and fan to replace the stock one.

Exactly how did you reset the heatsink on the CPU? I suggest that you check if the CPU heatsink is properly and snugly installed and the lockbars haven't come loose, etc. Then, remove the heatsink and check if the thermal paste you applied when you reset the heatsink over the CPU has not flowed down onto the mounting chip itself, which will cause this. That will happen if too much is applied, and it is a common mistake. If you don't know how to do this, do not attempt it but post back.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#4 shiftahhh

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:50 PM

Before buying anything, you might want to take a quick look at all of the capacitors on your motherboard and make sure none of them are bulging or have burst.


As far as I can tell they all look normal. I looked up a picture for reference since I am not familiar with this, and none of them look like they are bulging or leaking.


Hello Shiftahhh, sorry to hear of your problems. You said:

I went out and bought a new decent quality heat sink and fan to replace the stock one.

Exactly how did you reset the heatsink on the CPU? I suggest that you check if the CPU heatsink is properly and snugly installed and the lockbars haven't come loose, etc. Then, remove the heatsink and check if the thermal paste you applied when you reset the heatsink over the CPU has not flowed down onto the mounting chip itself, which will cause this. That will happen if too much is applied, and it is a common mistake. If you don't know how to do this, do not attempt it but post back.


The heat sink is definitely snugly in place, but it is possible that the thermal paste may have been applied wrong. I was having a very hard time getting the screws to line up since my heatsink used some very odd crossbar thing to hold everything down and the thermal paste may have smeared a bit. I don't think I used too much. I haven't done it often, but my friend was watching when I did it and said it should be fine. But, I will check to make sure everything is fine and will apply new paste.

If it appears that thermal paste has overflown...what is the best course of action?

Thanks for the replies.

#5 ranchhand_

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 06:39 AM

If there is too much thermal grease applied and it got on the mounting wafer, I use a tiny amount of paint thinner on the edge of a paper towel; it instantly dissolves the grease and then evaporates leaving nothing behind. Isopropyl Alcohol (rubbing alcohol) works a little slower but will also do it. If you were careful initially and have done this before then you probably did not overapply. Since you had problems remounting the CPU, check carefully that the heatsink is sitting flat and level on the mounting bracket. Even if it is slighly off-center or not level it will give you problems.
Another thing you can test is to see if your front-panel power-on switch is going bad; a faulty switch can do some weird things. Power down, unplug the power cord, and pull the power-on switch cable off where it plugs into the mobo. You will see two, tiny contacts. Then plug in the main power cord and short the contacts with a screwdriver. The unit should power-up normally and continue running. Run it that way for a few hours and if the problem stops your front panel power-on switch is bad.
I have included a link to a picture of bad capacitors on a mobo that have failed. Note that many times there may be no residue showing, but the tops are not perfectly level and have noticeably bulged upward. Sometimes a cap will split open at the bottom but the top is clear.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague
I like to check out the easy things first before starting to replace things. :wink:

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#6 shiftahhh

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 03:14 PM

If there is too much thermal grease applied and it got on the mounting wafer, I use a tiny amount of paint thinner on the edge of a paper towel; it instantly dissolves the grease and then evaporates leaving nothing behind. Isopropyl Alcohol (rubbing alcohol) works a little slower but will also do it. If you were careful initially and have done this before then you probably did not overapply. Since you had problems remounting the CPU, check carefully that the heatsink is sitting flat and level on the mounting bracket. Even if it is slighly off-center or not level it will give you problems.
Another thing you can test is to see if your front-panel power-on switch is going bad; a faulty switch can do some weird things. Power down, unplug the power cord, and pull the power-on switch cable off where it plugs into the mobo. You will see two, tiny contacts. Then plug in the main power cord and short the contacts with a screwdriver. The unit should power-up normally and continue running. Run it that way for a few hours and if the problem stops your front panel power-on switch is bad.
I have included a link to a picture of bad capacitors on a mobo that have failed. Note that many times there may be no residue showing, but the tops are not perfectly level and have noticeably bulged upward. Sometimes a cap will split open at the bottom but the top is clear.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague
I like to check out the easy things first before starting to replace things. :wink:


Thanks for the suggestions, I will try everything and hopefully things will be fixed....hard to tell though since the problem might not occur again for a few days.

#7 Artrooks

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 08:52 PM

Hello,

The Speccy Snapshot, under hard drive SMART, reports that your drive D: is "Bad." This may be an incidental finding, but I would remove the power from the drive and test for a while. If nothing else, back-up any important data that is on the D: drive. You could run the Western Digital diagnostics software as a second opinion after data back-up.

WDC WD1001FALS-00J7B0 ATA Device
S.M.A.R.T
Status: Bad
Partition 0
Partition ID: Disk #1, Partition #0
Disk Letter: D:
File System: NTFS
Volume Serial Number: 9AFD5F37
Size: 932GB
Used Space: 798GB (86%)
Free Space: 133GB (14%)

Regards,
Brooks



 





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