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Bandwidth capping - wifi, multiple routers/access points


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#1 Ben.S

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 12:33 PM

Hi,

I'm figuring out what the best way would be to cap bandwidth for wifi users. We've got about 20 students in our building and we require four routers/access points for proper coverage.
Then we have the typical problem with students, they like eating up bandwidth. :)
I'm looking for a way to make sure our 15 Mbps line is fairly shared among the users: I'd like to limit them all to a reasonable speed (~90kByte/sec) to make sure zero-latency applications like Skype don't heavily suffer from high latency, but perhaps too with the option to give them burstable bandwidth (when no one else is using it for example).

I'm aware that this will cost a bit of money but prepared to give it to it, although naming a budget would be difficult and depending on what I eventually get (if it all can be done router wise, it'll probably be cheaper than when I put down a controlling server and a bunch of access points).
The provider gave us a router, so it'll be a router-behind-router setup anyway. Can anyone make me (router) hardware/software suggestions for this setup? I'm guessing access points are too dumb to apply traffic shaping rules?
I'd prefer not to use a controlling server because it can't really be put in a secure place.
Please note that I'm looking for a hard cap in bps and not for proper QoS: if someone wants to clog up his own line he should be free to. :-)

-Ben

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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 15 August 2012 - 07:27 PM

Yep, take a look at ip specific bandwidth control. I will post more info in a little bit
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#3 Ben.S

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 12:39 PM

Hi,

That would be indeed what I'm looking for -although the same restriction can be applied to *all* IP addresses connected. :-)

#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 06:32 PM

You can Set the filter to apply only to the DCHP pool, and set the full bandwidth computers static IP addresses. Or if they don't all have to be on the same network Create a wireless subnet and filter the subnet. In Scenario one you would set it up EX: 192.168.1.1/24 (255.255.255.0) Network address you have 253 IP addresses for the router to assign. Assign the router to DHCP pool of 192.168.1.25 - 192.168.1.50 ( room for 5 friends to connnect ). The computers you do not need to limit. Set static at any of the other 228 address. When the network is set-up Enable Mac Address filtering so the wireless students can't set their IP addresses static. One such setup is How to Cap your roomates bandwidth a very popular blog from Mark Maunder. I have not tried the bandwidth filtering but it works great for port blocking and routing your kids computers to OpenDns to block filter their internet.


Edit: the Sub net filter would depend on the router.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 16 August 2012 - 06:34 PM.

Chad Mockensturm 
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#5 Ben.S

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 07:02 PM

As said, it can apply to *all* computers, static or not. OpenDNS for filtering their internet isn't required, they're free to do what they want.
I saw the DDWRT option but I can find very little on which router would then be a fair option (whilst still giving fair wireless N coverage). I would find it hard to believe if there aren't any routers that have the feature build in?
An other question, if I have one router limiting the bandwidth on IP basis, all the rest can be set up as access points, correct? (that'd make it easier as I could take a wired router with simple access points behind it... any experiance with fortigates / limiting? I can't find a decent feature list or webdemo of those (like the 50/60B's..))

Edited by Ben.S, 16 August 2012 - 07:03 PM.


#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 09:36 PM

The filter doesn't have to be on the wifi router. You could use a DHCP server, Network firewall or a enterprise class router. The network is easier to maintain and secure if you have one source asigning and monitoring traffic. So one router or firewall and several access points is a typical network
Layout. Traffic shaping is done all the time by ISP's if they didn't they would loose money. That's why you only have a 15mb connection. There is software for dns servers, DHCP servers, as well as settings in windows server 2008 R2 (Which can do both) look at dscp filtering. Sorry I am not being very specific there are allot of options and I haven't set up a bandwidth specific filter yet.

Edit:sorry I missread your post.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 16 August 2012 - 09:36 PM.

Chad Mockensturm 
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#7 Ben.S

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 02:11 PM

Bumpy, anyone else that does have experience with specific hardware models?




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