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What's this type of book called?


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#1 RB_Kandy

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 03:48 PM

It's the sort of fiction book that gives the reader the option to do this thing or that thing, like "To listen to Captain Kirk and beam up to safety, turn to page 18. To disobey Kirk and stay with him, turn to page 32"

I need to know what that type of book is called so that i can Google it for writing tips.

Also, what is that type of game called that gives you a sentence, and awaits for instructions? I remember playing these old games as a kid on Commador64,I even remember at age 10 trying to program such a game. I recall the markup looked something like:
if $="walk west" go to 220
if $="examine lock" go to 240

and so on and so forth. Any idea what that genre of games were called? or even what language I was learning back then?

I just remember the language was all centered on display "this line" which brought up text. And the user would input as many choices as you would allow, each imput being matched by replying with a block of text from any given line. I stopped my pursuit of this language when I was trying to make it so you had to have a key to open a lock, but what would stop the user from just typing "use key" to go to the line that claims the lock is opened and you can now walk inside. It was a principal called "string" and it was too difficult for my 10 year old brain to understand. Although, looking back on it, I could have given the key a special name like "Garage_Key2551" and that way if you didn't find it, you wouldn't know the precise name.
Anyhow, I sure would like to give programing that type of game another chance now that I am 35 and have a much better grasp of logic.

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#2 rotor123

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 05:39 PM

This looks like the type of book you are thinking of.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamebook

A gamebook is a work of fiction that allows the reader to participate in the story by making effective choices. The narrative branches along various paths through the use of numbered paragraphs or pages.


Is this the game
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossal_Cave_Adventure

Colossal Cave Adventure (also known as ADVENT, Colossal Cave, or Adventure)[1] gave its name to the computer adventure game genre.[2] It was originally designed by Will Crowther, a programmer and caving enthusiast who based the layout on part of the Mammoth Cave system in Kentucky.[3] The Colossal Cave subnetwork has many entrances, one of which is known as Bedquilt. Crowther reproduced portions of the real cave so faithfully that cavers who have played the game can easily navigate through familiar sections in the Bedquilt region on their first visit.[4]


The language you are describing sounds like Basic. However there were many variations of basic.

if $="walk west" go to 220
if $="examine lock" go to 240

What that means is that if the keyboard input into $ is a exact match to "walk west" goto line 220, in goto line 220 the word line is implied, some basic versions required you to use it and some you could skip it.

A more advanced line might read if $ = "walk west" goto line 220 else goto line 300
where line 300 might just display text along the lines of "I don't understand you" and then return you to the input line.

Line refers to the line number in the code , some Basic versions required you to actually number them and others were a little more liberal. Version where you numbered the lines made it easy to leave space for changes and to start routines on blocks of numbers.

Hope this helps
Roger

Edited by rotor123, 09 July 2012 - 05:53 PM.

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#3 RB_Kandy

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 08:25 PM

Thank you for the info, Roger.
Now that I know the name of the genre, I have been able to google it and look for tips on how to write it.
as for the actual method of implementation, I'll just put it on my website and make each choice a hyper link to the appropriate branch of the story.

And the moment you said BASIC, I had to google it. I looked at it, and yes, I was definitely using some version of BASIC. I been looking over BASIC for about an hour now, I might decide to actually learn and practice it.

#4 rotor123

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Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:52 AM

Glad to know that was what you were thinking about and to have been helpful.

Roger

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