Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Compatibility


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 PsvyXloneAeon

PsvyXloneAeon

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 26 June 2012 - 03:53 AM

So I'm building my first computer from nothing. In all instances of computer upgrading I've always added additional parts to the rig, and at this point, the computer from Best Buy (Considering it was pre-assembled, it was an amazing gaming computer) I bought almost 4 years ago is a completely different machine except for the case and the motherboard. I've decided that it's time for me to build my own computer from nothing, using entirely Newegg.

I realized that I have horrible compatibility luck, and tend to have something go wrong. I did my best to scan through the items I had assembled and check for any inconsistencies in the pieces, making sure they would all work together, but I would feel immeasurably more comfortable knowing that someone else had taken a stab at finding something wrong.

I made this list by reading their reviews and stacking them against my requirements. I'm a graphic designer, audio producer, and I like to game, but I'm not looking for ridiculous, useless <0.01% spec differences. I'd like to know if I post a breakdown of what I plan on buying, if some kind folks would be interested in looking it over and giving me some tips as to what I need/don't need, and if there would be any conflicting hardware to be wary of?

Thanks for your time.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 PM

Posted 26 June 2012 - 05:53 AM

Where is the list you mentioned, we'll take a look? For a gaming PC, to get decent performance, you don't need a super high-end CPU and graphics card, more mid-range parts can still give you 60 fps without spending tons of cash. With computer technology, there's a sort of "Sweet spot" where performance and value are quite good.

3939.png

 


#3 PsvyXloneAeon

PsvyXloneAeon
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 26 June 2012 - 11:39 AM

Where is the list you mentioned, we'll take a look? For a gaming PC, to get decent performance, you don't need a super high-end CPU and graphics card, more mid-range parts can still give you 60 fps without spending tons of cash. With computer technology, there's a sort of "Sweet spot" where performance and value are quite good.


I didn't post the list yet because I didn't know if people would be interested in helping me with something like this. I'm aware of a good finance-performance balance, that's what I tried to do with this list.
Posted Image

#4 coxchris

coxchris

  • Members
  • 1,151 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Atwater
  • Local time:11:11 AM

Posted 26 June 2012 - 02:28 PM

ok you have a problem with the motherboard and CPU

You have a AMD CPU with a Intel motherboard. They aren't Compatible with the socket type and different pin outs.

You have a Intel Moth board but not compatible CPU.

If you go by Intel you need a intel CPU

Since you have a Quad Core the Intel equal to i-5 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115076

If you not OC you don't need a CPU cooler. When buying retail CPU they come with a fan or (stock cooler)

On that motherboard you have on-board sound so I personally use On board instead of PCI card because sound is sound and I dont have to mess with another component.

it seems like a good build to me

You missing RAM and Windows 7 disc OEM or retail

Memory http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233170 59.00

Windows 7 Home OEM http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986 89

AA in Computer Networking Technology

BS in Information Technology 

Comptia A+, Project+, L+

Renewable:  N+,S+

CIW Web Design Specialist, JavaScript Specialist,  Database Design Specialist 

LPIC-1, SUSE 


#5 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 PM

Posted 26 June 2012 - 04:15 PM

The previous poster is right, AMD and Intel CPU's and motherboards don't mix. Here are some ideas...

Case: Rosewill CHALLENGER - Your case is good, no real need to change things unless you want a high-end GPU or plan on using multiple graphics cards. $50

Motherboard: ASUS M5A97 AM3+ AMD 970 - This offers most of what your MSI board does, but with AMD in mind. If you see yourself using Crossfire or SLI, consider a 990FX based motherboard as it has higher PCI-E X16 bandwidth. $94

CPU: AMD FX-8120 Zambezi 3.1GHz - This is roughly equal to Intel's 2500k processor in terms of performance. Alternatively, the AMD FX-6100 Zambezi 3.3GHz offers a good blend of performance and value too. $169

GPU: SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7850 2GB - This is roughly equal to the GTX 560, it is a bit more energy efficient though. $239

Power Supply: CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 - For a single graphics card, this is more than enough. For multiple cards, I would get a 750W or greater unit. $89

RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 - I use this RAM in my current AMD build. $46

Hard Drive: SAMSUNG EcoGreen F4 HD204UI 2TB - I believe this is the same drive you chose. $119

ODD: Sony Optiarc 24X DVD Burner, Bulk Package Black SATA Model AD-7280S-0B - A basic drive, I've used this in two of my other builds. $18

CPU Cooler: XIGMATEK Gaia SD1283 - Traditionally, I tell people not to get aftermarket cooling unless they overclock, but, given the higher performance, and thus heat generation and power consumption of this processor, combined with its use case, I do suggest this, if only to keep the noise down. I have an FX-8150 and a similar cooler, the stock fan is loud but this is much better, and cooler. $29

OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit OEM - You need this. Alternatively, you can use the Windows 8 RP until it is launched in a few months and buy it then. Note, however, there is no in-place upgrade if you do this. $99

(Optional) ASUS VS229H-P Black 21.5" - Although this is a little smaller than what you've chosen, it's an IPS monitor which gives a better image. $163

(Optional) ASUS Xonar DS - The motherboard has on-board sound which is good for most people, but, if you're wanting a few more options, a dedicated audio card can help. Remember, with audio, the quality is only as good as it's weakest part, whether that is the music file, card, or headphones/speakers. $41

Grand Total (Including Optional Components): $1,164

3939.png

 


#6 PsvyXloneAeon

PsvyXloneAeon
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 26 June 2012 - 11:30 PM

You missing RAM and Windows 7 disc OEM or retail

Memory http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233170 59.00

Windows 7 Home OEM http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16832116986 89


I've already got 16GB of DDR3 RAM lined up. I also have Win7 Ultimate here, can't I just use that? I figured I could. God I'm terrible at this haha

The previous poster is right, AMD and Intel CPU's and motherboards don't mix. Here are some ideas...

Motherboard: ASUS M5A97 AM3+ AMD 970 - This offers most of what your MSI board does, but with AMD in mind. If you see yourself using Crossfire or SLI, consider a 990FX based motherboard as it has higher PCI-E X16 bandwidth. $94

CPU: AMD FX-8120 Zambezi 3.1GHz - This is roughly equal to Intel's 2500k processor in terms of performance. Alternatively, the AMD FX-6100 Zambezi 3.3GHz offers a good blend of performance and value too. $169

GPU: SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 7850 2GB - This is roughly equal to the GTX 560, it is a bit more energy efficient though. $239

Power Supply: CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX650 - For a single graphics card, this is more than enough. For multiple cards, I would get a 750W or greater unit. $89

RAM: Mushkin Enhanced Silverline 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 - I use this RAM in my current AMD build. $46

Hard Drive: SAMSUNG EcoGreen F4 HD204UI 2TB - I believe this is the same drive you chose. $119

ODD: Sony Optiarc 24X DVD Burner, Bulk Package Black SATA Model AD-7280S-0B - A basic drive, I've used this in two of my other builds. $18

CPU Cooler: XIGMATEK Gaia SD1283 - Traditionally, I tell people not to get aftermarket cooling unless they overclock, but, given the higher performance, and thus heat generation and power consumption of this processor, combined with its use case, I do suggest this, if only to keep the noise down. I have an FX-8150 and a similar cooler, the stock fan is loud but this is much better, and cooler. $29

OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit OEM - You need this. Alternatively, you can use the Windows 8 RP until it is launched in a few months and buy it then. Note, however, there is no in-place upgrade if you do this. $99

(Optional) ASUS VS229H-P Black 21.5" - Although this is a little smaller than what you've chosen, it's an IPS monitor which gives a better image. $163

(Optional) ASUS Xonar DS - The motherboard has on-board sound which is good for most people, but, if you're wanting a few more options, a dedicated audio card can help. Remember, with audio, the quality is only as good as it's weakest part, whether that is the music file, card, or headphones/speakers. $41

Grand Total (Including Optional Components): $1,164


This is a fantastic breakdown of alternative options, I've been looking through this list for a bit now. Interestingly enough, I've viewed most, if not all of these items as well. I did want to bring up the PSU, as I've had some troubling experiences with the PSU as I've hat two that have blown out of my old PC from gaming, and 650W would not even support my rig now. That being said, I want to be sure I am well within the capacity of the PSU when I buy it.

As far as cooling is concerned, I'm very worried about space, so much so, that I'm very particular about making sure things don't have to be crushed into the case to make it close. I picked that cooler because I assumed that it was a bit smaller, especially reading some of the feedback on the coolers, a lot of people are very concerned about the sizes of these fans so I tried to find the best of both worlds (size vs. performance).

A quality sound card is important to me, I do too much music production and engineering to skimp on these things, outside of building a pro studio.

Now about these monitors, what are the differences outside of size? I know that LED is generally better than LCD but I tried to keep the cost lower by disregarding innocuous hardware differences. Assuming that I knew that they were innocuous, they could me monumentally different in quality, which is why I'm here.

My cost limit is $2,000, and I plan on buying these parts over the next two months, so I'm more than willing to take my time to make sure that this is as good and hiccup-free as I can get it.

#7 coxchris

coxchris

  • Members
  • 1,151 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Atwater
  • Local time:11:11 AM

Posted 27 June 2012 - 09:42 AM

I've already got 16GB of DDR3 RAM lined up. I also have Win7 Ultimate here, can't I just use that? I figured I could. God I'm terrible at this haha

By default, we put that in our list to let people know about the purchasing a suitable OS. If you an OS than your fine with Ultimate You can use that. Be advise if you have a retail copy you can reuse it o if you ever had a damage motherboard. OEM disks tied to the motherboard so you are going to replace the exact or similar motherboard when it broke

16GB is enough ram for you since your going to do audio graphical stuff. Make sure you have a x64 bit

8GB is the limit for gaming but however you are doing a lot of rendering so your fine with 16GB

the same Corsair PSU is on my system. It never fails me yet

I have amd fx6100 with 550ti. SSD and Hard drive working with that power supply.

I have this the newer version of this case if you want to look if you are concern about cooling This is a HAF 912 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119233&Tpk=haf%20912 -59.00 High Air Flow is what is stands for great air flow. This is optional case

PCI express 3.0x16 is backward compatible to PCI EX 2.0 x16

I would purchase a sound card to match the rating you had 7.1 sound card I would match it for 7.1 speakers

Edited by coxchris, 27 June 2012 - 09:48 AM.

AA in Computer Networking Technology

BS in Information Technology 

Comptia A+, Project+, L+

Renewable:  N+,S+

CIW Web Design Specialist, JavaScript Specialist,  Database Design Specialist 

LPIC-1, SUSE 


#8 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 PM

Posted 27 June 2012 - 12:50 PM

To expand further on your questions...

Many people buy PSU's based on what their GPU needs. The Radeon 7800 series requires a 500W power supply, so 650W is more than enough. The Radeon 7900 series also requires about the same. As GPU models go up, so does power efficiency.

Most cases, unless you get a special slimline case, typically are standardized, so, unless the case has an unusual design, that Xigmatek cool should fit. Look at the reviews for that case and compare their coolers, if they are listed. A 120mm fan can cool better and be more quiet than a smaller fan.

If you are a pro-sumer, you may want a better sound card for more options. I rather enjoy my Asus Xonar D2X, but they no longer make that. I would get the ASUS 90-YAA0E0-0UAN00Z 7.1 Xonar Essence or the HT | OMEGA CLARO II 7.1.

All of those flat panel monitors are LCD, but, there are differences with the backlight, LED and CCFL. LED's are more energy efficient and usually have better contrast over CCFL. The VW246H Glossy Black 24" is a TN-based monitor, and the VS229H-P Black 21.5" is an IPS monitor. This refers to the LCD technology itself, not the backlight. TN monitors are fairly inexpensive to produce, but have a narrow viewing angle. IPS is more expensive, but has a larger viewing angle and better color accuracy.

3939.png

 


#9 PsvyXloneAeon

PsvyXloneAeon
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 28 June 2012 - 12:41 AM

To expand further on your questions...

Many people buy PSU's based on what their GPU needs. The Radeon 7800 series requires a 500W power supply, so 650W is more than enough. The Radeon 7900 series also requires about the same. As GPU models go up, so does power efficiency.

Most cases, unless you get a special slimline case, typically are standardized, so, unless the case has an unusual design, that Xigmatek cool should fit. Look at the reviews for that case and compare their coolers, if they are listed. A 120mm fan can cool better and be more quiet than a smaller fan.

If you are a pro-sumer, you may want a better sound card for more options. I rather enjoy my Asus Xonar D2X, but they no longer make that. I would get the ASUS 90-YAA0E0-0UAN00Z 7.1 Xonar Essence or the HT | OMEGA CLARO II 7.1.

All of those flat panel monitors are LCD, but, there are differences with the backlight, LED and CCFL. LED's are more energy efficient and usually have better contrast over CCFL. The VW246H Glossy Black 24" is a TN-based monitor, and the VS229H-P Black 21.5" is an IPS monitor. This refers to the LCD technology itself, not the backlight. TN monitors are fairly inexpensive to produce, but have a narrow viewing angle. IPS is more expensive, but has a larger viewing angle and better color accuracy.


This is good information, I'm looking into some of these products. I don't plan on implementing dual graphics cards anytime soon. Space is a really big factor in my rig, I hate crushing things or packing them so tight that the airflow is destroyed.

I have this the newer version of this case if you want to look if you are concern about cooling This is a HAF 912 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119233&Tpk=haf%20912 -59.00 High Air Flow is what is stands for great air flow. This is optional case


I had viewed that case before, it's pretty awesome, but some of the reviews put me off, specifically "cheap couplings on the side panel hinges", and "various other problems". Perhaps I could reconsider it.

Edited by PsvyXloneAeon, 28 June 2012 - 12:44 AM.


#10 coxchris

coxchris

  • Members
  • 1,151 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Atwater
  • Local time:11:11 AM

Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:26 PM

I have 922 but not cheap at the moment It has it drawbacks but its your call.

AA in Computer Networking Technology

BS in Information Technology 

Comptia A+, Project+, L+

Renewable:  N+,S+

CIW Web Design Specialist, JavaScript Specialist,  Database Design Specialist 

LPIC-1, SUSE 


#11 PsvyXloneAeon

PsvyXloneAeon
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:46 PM

I have 922 but not cheap at the moment It has it drawbacks but its your call.


Such as?

#12 coxchris

coxchris

  • Members
  • 1,151 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Atwater
  • Local time:11:11 AM

Posted 29 June 2012 - 09:19 AM

It only minor draw backs

PRO:
Hugh room
Alot of Fans 3 preinstall fants
CPU Aftermarket Cooler hole

Well ventilated Posted Image

Cons;
Dust manget
sticking door
Big on size

But overall is a good case 912 is a little bit smaller

I bought this 922 case when it was on sale http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0026FCI2U/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00 in 2011 right now its http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119197 119.99+14.99 shiping

AA in Computer Networking Technology

BS in Information Technology 

Comptia A+, Project+, L+

Renewable:  N+,S+

CIW Web Design Specialist, JavaScript Specialist,  Database Design Specialist 

LPIC-1, SUSE 


#13 PsvyXloneAeon

PsvyXloneAeon
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:01:11 PM

Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:17 PM

It only minor draw backs

PRO:
Hugh room
Alot of Fans 3 preinstall fants
CPU Aftermarket Cooler hole

Well ventilated

Cons;
Dust manget
sticking door
Big on size

But overall is a good case 912 is a little bit smaller

I bought this 922 case when it was on sale http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0026FCI2U/ref=oh_details_o03_s00_i00 in 2011 right now its http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119197 119.99+14.99 shiping


Those aren't terrible cons actually, and the case does look sleek and badass so I might just go for it.

So the general consensus is:

I need to have my Processor match the motherboard.

Other than that, what else? Were there any other major problems with the setup?
(I have switched out some parts I had initially selected for some of your suggestions BTW)

#14 DJBPace07

DJBPace07

  • BC Advisor
  • 4,869 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:11 PM

Posted 29 June 2012 - 01:29 PM

Nothing really, the build I did above does include everything you need to get going.

3939.png

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users