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would like to learn java for apps


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#1 jcarlos100

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 09:21 PM

soo i would like to learn how to program apps for the blackberry and maybe the playbook in the future
im pretty much a total noob i dont know nothing what so ever well i do know that its a object oriented programming language and that you need a compiler to translate what you type...thats pretty much it lol dont get me wrong i have tried i even bought my self a textbook called Head First Java, 2nd Edition i tried to read ch1 but ended up lost reread it like 3 times still didt get it i thought it was for total noobs maybe not so i got 2 other books called introduction to java programming comprehensive 8th edition and introduction to java programming brief version 8th edition i read some reviews on amazon that its for total beginners

also im pretty sure you have to learn how to program in java to make apps for blackberry maybe for android?
are these books enough for a beginner?
any future books i should get after im past beginner level?
i have heard to learn other easier languages then move up to java is it a good idea?
also im in break from college soo i have alot of spare time wouldnt mind learning how to proggram in java

thank you for your time

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#2 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 11 June 2012 - 09:37 PM

Before you can consider becoming a serious programmer, getting into the habit of using correct English when you're typing is going to go a long way in making things work out well for you.

I'm not saying this to just be a stickler; I'm saying it because in order to do that you're sort of forced to become a better typist. And in comments, variable naming, and application design, things are much Much MUCH easier to understand when one doesn't need to go back and try to translate what someone wrote to understand the shorthand they were using.

Now, as for specific things with respect to Java, you need to learn Java the language, well before you can even come close to considering writing applications for a particular platform. That means writing simple command line applications in order to familiarize yourself with the programming language itself, and with programming itself as more of a general concept. For that you'll need a Java textbook. Don't go for anything that says "in XXX hours", or for anything that specifically mentions Blackberry or any other kind of application domain. The former are just renowned for poor quality, and the latter are going to assume you already know Java as a language and are working to understand the specific platform in question.

As for the beginner comment; you're not going to be writing Java applications for Blackberry or Android as a beginner. You need to learn the language first. Once you've learned the language then you might want to try your hand at alternate platforms.

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#3 jcarlos100

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 04:09 PM

yea i agree with the better English part

i actually did do some work with the command line in college a couple of labs
so do you recommend any books for me? i already have 3 but not sure i can understand those yet

#4 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 01:27 AM

so do you recommend any books for me? i already have 3 but not sure i can understand those yet

Then I'd work to start understanding them. (Assuming they're reasonable books for beginners)

No sense in spending money if you don't have to, right?

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#5 jcarlos100

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 08:34 PM

ok i will try that then thanks

#6 Yetzederixx

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 01:08 PM

If you're a college student still you can join the IEEE for $40. Part of your benefits will be access to O'Reilly Media's vast catalogue of excellent books. Once you've read one without purchasing it you've paid for your subscription for the year.

I've never heard anything bad about the Headfirst book you already own, but like Billy pointed out anything that promises decent results with minimal work is going to be subpar. The titles you stated should be fine. Power through it. Look up anything that confuses you somewhere else since you may find an explanation that speaks better to you. Go to your school's tutoring center, if they have one, they may be able to point you towards resources that helped them understand it.

As far as programming for mobile devices goes. Android uses a specific Software Development Kit (SDK) which is in Java, but you will need to know the ins and outs of the language in general before you do something specific like that. That said... There's this route as well; the MIT App Inventor. I seriously doubt it will make very strong apps without some knowledge of Java, but my college offers a course in it for non-Computer Science majors so it may just help you out as well. Plus the site comes with various tutorials and whatnot.

Hope this all helps.

Edited by Yetzederixx, 15 July 2012 - 01:09 PM.


#7 Bit-Shift

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 10:23 AM

As many other people said, consider starting with the basics before doing applications. You must expand your Java knowledge further by learning how primitive data types (Integer, Double, Float, Byte, etc.) works. Then you can create methods and make it print a message if a condition is met. That's how I learned the basics and it worked wonderfully.

#8 Romeo29

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 11:12 AM

jcarlos100, all those are excellent Java books. You have to read one section and carry out problems/exercises on your computer. If you just keep reading, you will not understand anything.

BTW, Blackberry seems to be losing the market everyday. I suggest you make Android programming your goal. Android market is on rise.

#9 attak sekwence

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 03:19 AM

I know I'm fairly late to respond to this thread but check out your local library too, like billy said no sense in sending money if you don't have to. I just came back from my library with 5 python books under my arm and there were a ton of java books too. That textbook is probably difficult to understand. In my experiance sometimes when someone explains something a little differently, or uses a different example to explain something it may make a lot more sense to you. When I was going to school for automechanics I had a teacher that taught us by the book how basic electricity works (relationships between amperage, voltage and resistance etc) and only half the class could understand it. Then he explained the same concept just a little differently by comparing it to a water hose and almost everyone in the class was able to relate to it and grasped the concept more effectively. Sometimes just a certain spin on the concept like that can lead you to an A-Ha moment.

#10 CrimsonSpider

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 07:26 AM

Learning a new programming language is no walk in the park.
Java is considered to be an excellent starting point though. I've been learning for two years now, and at first, i didn't quite enjoy it, as my lecturers piled so much work and the concepts are difficult to grasp. But once you tackle the first couple of hurdles, it becomes easier. You can't rush it, or you'll become wrapped up and rather confused.
So my advice would be, start slow, read a couple of basic/beginner books as they would be very beneficial. They are everywhere and each is a little different (as Attak mentioned above), but be sure not to start mobile applications until you are crossing into the intermediate levels (at least).
Hope this helped and happy programming!

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#11 annahussy

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:54 PM

Hi,I don't know about any good book of java programming but i like to suggest you to use online option that provides many of tutorial website that you can use to learn java. Its provide all subject information in brief with example that makes an easy way to learn and understand all the function of java that you can use to create blackberry apps. I want to suggest you to make android apps because now a days android market growing well.

#12 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 12:18 AM

The problem is that most online sources lack the professionalism, clarity, and coherence offered by most good programming textbooks. Moreover, a large majority of online sources in this area teach bad habits like "go online and find code that happens to do what you want to copy without understanding". Don't get me wrong: there is a place for using well established libraries to solve problems. But there's a difference between "a well established library" and "some random forum post somewhere". :)

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#13 Vertiglow

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 03:07 AM

Upon reading this, I feel as if I have found a home. Finally a group of people who tell it like it is. Learning a programming language is not something that is just,"done". It's a seemingly infinite life long pursuit of that language. You also need to have O.C.D lol.

#14 jcarlos100

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:23 PM

If you're a college student still you can join the IEEE for $40. Part of your benefits will be access to O'Reilly Media's vast catalogue of excellent books. Once you've read one without purchasing it you've paid for your subscription for the year.

I've never heard anything bad about the Headfirst book you already own, but like Billy pointed out anything that promises decent results with minimal work is going to be subpar. The titles you stated should be fine. Power through it. Look up anything that confuses you somewhere else since you may find an explanation that speaks better to you. Go to your school's tutoring center, if they have one, they may be able to point you towards resources that helped them understand it.

As far as programming for mobile devices goes. Android uses a specific Software Development Kit (SDK) which is in Java, but you will need to know the ins and outs of the language in general before you do something specific like that. That said... There's this route as well; the MIT App Inventor. I seriously doubt it will make very strong apps without some knowledge of Java, but my college offers a course in it for non-Computer Science majors so it may just help you out as well. Plus the site comes with various tutorials and whatnot.

Hope this all helps.

i actually have heard of the ieee but not the other things you have said i will and i know some professors at my college who teach classes about java programming but im earning networking as a major so i cant take them but i will ask them about how they started out




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