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Power Supply


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Firepaw

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 12:37 AM

What does a power supply do and how does it affect other hardware? Also, how should i know how strong of a power supply i should get? Thanks for any help.
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#2 acklan

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 01:00 AM

The power supply for a computer in a step down transformer. It will reduce 120v or 230v to 3v, 5v, and 12v so that the devices inside your computer can use it. The power suppies are rated by the watts it delievers. Volts X Amps = Watts.
As far as how what wattage you need depends on yourcomputer and the devices connected to it. If you would list the Make Model and components we could give you a estimite on your possible requirements.
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#3 jgweed

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 01:13 AM

Here is an excellent explanation of what a computer's power supply is and how it works with the other components in your case:

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/power-supply.htm

The size of the power supply will depend on the number and kind of components you have (e.g., fans, disk drives, motherboard, peripheral cards, etc.),how you use your computer, and whether you elect to overclock it.

The usual range is between 350w to 500w.

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#4 Firepaw

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 08:27 PM

Well here are the things:
Floppy Drive
Motherboard
CPU
ram
Hard drive
Video card
OS
CD drive
While your at it would you mind telling me if all of those go together? Thanks for the help this is the first time ive tried to build a computer.
~Firepaw

#5 KermitD

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 10:18 PM

It looks like the stuff that has to go together will go together. I'd get the biggest power supply you can find. You may want to add more stuff later on. Don't forget to include a heat sync and cooling fan for your microprocessor.
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#6 Firepaw

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 11:04 PM

Um thanks, but can i get an estimate on the smallest power supply that would work with these. There's a case i want to get that comes with a power supply and i need to know if it is strong enough.
~Firepaw

#7 acklan

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 11:44 PM

I could be wrong, but I don't tihnik you want to skimp on a power supply. It will cause power problem. An unstable power supply can cause unexspected restarts, damage to electronic parts, and corrupted data.
I believe with the parts you have listed you can go with a 450w power supply. Ant lower and I believe you at the very least have a premature failure of the PS.
IMHO
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#8 Firepaw

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Posted 02 March 2006 - 11:56 PM

Thanks for all the help, I guess i'll buy the case another power supply then :thumbsup:.
~Firepaw

#9 AMD010

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 04:13 AM

Yes, i have seen many people say "oh i wont worry to much about a good power supply." then 6 months down the road they cant figure out why they fried there motherboard.
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#10 Herk

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 09:25 PM

Many of the power supplies that come with cases last about three years and then go bad, often taking a lot of other stuff with them. But some of the cheaper cases have power supplies that one out of three won't work at all! I usually spend a minimum of $40 on a power supply. The ones with the bigger fans (120mm) are a bit quieter.




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