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Slow speeds on gigabit LAN


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5 replies to this topic

#1 alexsmith2709

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 05:42 AM

Hi,
My setup is as follows:
ASUS RT-N56U router with external 1TB HDD connected to it by USB.
Windows 7 Professional Desktop connected by ethernet cable (has gigabit LAN port).
1 Windows 7 Home premium laptop.
1 Windows 7 starter netbook.

My issue is slow transfer speeds to and from the desktop computer and the router HDD. I have also tried on the netbook and it is slow too (wired and wireless). The netbook is wireless N capable.

I have run Nicspeed and these are my results from the desktop:

Adapter: Intel® 82579V Gigabit Network Connection
Hardware address: MAC-ADDRESS-GOES-HERE
Target address: 192.168.1.1
Starting send/receive to/from network speed test (ICMP)
8208 packets, 16.7MByte total.
Sending took 2013 miliseconds.
Data transfer to/from network is 8.5MByte (67.9MBit) per second.
Starting maximum sending speed test (UDP)
131841 packets, 128.8MByte total.
Sending took 2012 miliseconds.
Sending speed is 65.5MByte (524.2MBit) per second.

When transferring files to and from the HDD connected to the router, i only get a maximum of about 8-10MB/s.
I have set both sides to gigabit connection instead of auto-detect. I have tried turning Remote Differential Compression off with no difference.
The ethernet cable is a CAT5e should it should handle gigabit speeds yes? It is only about a metre long.

My theory was that the router cannot handle reading/writing to the HDD any faster than this. If this is the case why do i get the result "Sending speed is 65.5MByte (524.2MBit) per second" on nicspeed?

Any help would be great.

Thanks,
Alex

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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 11:23 PM

It's not the network its the usb interface. your router only supports usb 2.0 which has a transfer.rate of 50Mbps. That combined with the transfer and read/write speed of your drive will certainly cause a bottle neck.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 27 May 2012 - 11:23 PM.

Chad Mockensturm 
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#3 alexsmith2709

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 12:43 PM

USb 2.0 is 480Mbps, which is 60MB/s. My HDD is also USB 2.0. Even with this, im only getting between 8-10MB/s when transferring files. I'd be happy if i was getting around 50-60MB/s.
Testing with nicspeed is only going to the router, not the hard drive so that should really be showing around the gigabit speed, not 500mbps

#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 01:02 PM

It's 480Mbits however your correct it equals 60MB/s my math was off. Are you using Cat 6 or Cat 5e cable from your router to your computer? Are you able to test the termination's?. Also make sure your Ethernet Adapters are set to 1/gb full duplex and not auto, or if its in Auto make sure its detecting a 1/gb connection.
Chad Mockensturm 
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Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#5 alexsmith2709

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 01:12 PM

Both sides are set manually to 1gigabit and its a CAT5e cable im using. From what i've been reading there doesnt seem to be any point upgrading to a CAT6, but that was one reason for my post, to see if anyone here thought it is worth it.

How do i test terminations?

#6 Sneakycyber

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 09:50 AM

Sorry for the very late reply I was reading up on MS server 2008 today and came across something I wasn't aware of. USB 2.0 is a shared bandwidth so depending on the number of connections to a specific controller the speed will be greatly reduced furthermore hubs will split the bandwidth even more. To test terminations you need a Network line Analyzer there usually expensive (not to be confused with a line tester that only test the connectivity of the line not the bandwidth). If you purchased your lines from a retailer they were tested or qualified by the manufacture before they were shipped to the retailer. However strain, nicks, cuts and animal bites will destroy them. I use This To test my connections and a Line verifier when it all goes wrong.


Edit: Found the exact model line verifier my employer uses.

Edited by Sneakycyber, 13 June 2012 - 09:52 AM.

Chad Mockensturm 
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