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Thinking of making a gaming PC this summer.


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#1 Dan50

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 06:47 PM

Never built one before. Any good tips on building them?

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#2 Marth_01

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 09:03 PM

Simple guide to building your first computer:

1. Determine your budget. Do you already have a monitor, keyboard, mouse, and speakers?
2. Determine your operating system. I assume Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit?
3. Find the parts you want, check reviews, look for deals.
4. Buy them from Newegg or similar online stores.
5. Build the computer. (Actually not that difficult)
6. If any part is DOA (dead on arrival), return it for a new one.

Tell me which numbers you need additional information about, and what level your knowledge about computers is at.

#3 Commander Gman

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Posted 16 May 2012 - 01:05 AM

To add between steps 3 & 4 in the above post, it is also important to check if the components are compatible with one another Posted Image if not, you would have to look for ones that are compatible.

Read reviews of a product before choosing to buy them as well as when looking at a product, you may want to take into consideration its features which make the product good (i.e. dust filters for ATX cases help in cleaning, Active PFC for power supplies, etc.)

Edited by Commander Gman, 16 May 2012 - 01:06 AM.

Motherboard: MSI P35 Neo-F (Socket 775 LGA) Processor: Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 @ 2.40 Ghz Kentsfield Chipset: Intel P35 Graphics Card: Nvidia Geforce GT 440 Memory: 2x 2GB DDR2 800 RAM Storage: 1x IDE 80GB, 1x SATA II 500 GB, 1x External 500GB HD Power Supply: 600W Power supply Monitor: Dual screen set-up Casing: Mini-ATX Fan(s): 1x 80mm silent fan OS: Windows XP SP3


#4 rotor123

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 03:35 PM

Hi, Visit this webpage from Newegg and watch the 3 videos on build a computer.
http://www.newegg.com/Store/Promotion.aspx?storeid=33&name=DIY-PC-Combos&cm_sp=Pillar2-_-BuildYourOwn-_-http%3a%2f%2fpromotions.newegg.com%2fhomepage%2fpillar%2fhomepage2011%2fbnr_lifestyle_combo.jpg

Then you will have a better idea of what is involved.

Then scroll down the page and look at their bundles to learn more. Those bundles are compatible parts within the bundle. Not between the bundles of course. They range from economy to Gaming. $340 to $1750 range, then you can get a feel for what you may want.

NO operating system at that price either it is extra.

Good Luck
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#5 hamluis

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 04:23 PM

Tiger Direct and Amazon...are also vendors I would include with Newegg re buying components.

When you actually have the components and begin the build...read the motherboard manual first, then go slowly with assembly. Don't make it a race or you may have to start all over again :).

Louis

#6 petercj

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 08:36 PM

Be sure to buy a good quality PSU, and make sure it has more than enough power to run the components.

Buy the best quality mobo you can afford - Gigabyte and Asus are two of the best makes on the market.

Also, go for top quality RAM that is matched to your mobo, and suitable for your Operating System.

The graphics card is a key component in a gaming machine, so before you buy I suggest you do some research on the net re a suitable card for the games you intend to play, and check out compatibility between the card and the chipset in the mobo.

If you put the make and model of the card into google, you will soon find info re any problems with the card, such as driver clashes, tendency to overheat, etc.

Personally, I would go for one of the latest low voltage Intel i5 or i7 processors that tend to run cooler under pressure.

If you are in the UK, I highly recommend dabs.com they have very keen prices, and I have found their after-sales service to be excellent.

Assembling a desktop PC is as easy as putting lego together, and usually takes about an hour without rushing. A simple but useful tip is to have a small but long shaft Phillips screwdriver to hand, with a small ball of bluetack to hold the screws on the tip - makes life a lot easier when placing small fiddly screws into awkward places ;-)

The most important task is making sure that all of the components are compatible, and that they are set up properly, jumpers, etc - details of which you should find in the mobo manual.

If you want to see how its done, take a look on You Tube the basics of assembly are pretty much the same from one desktop to another.

I doubt that you will save much on cost by building your own, but it does mean that you can build to your own specifications and requirements, and you can be sure of the quality of the components, e.g. a lot of off-the shelf desktops have cheap and nasty PSUs in them, even some of the top brands.

#7 Dan50

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 03:39 PM

Thanks :)




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