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Google Public DNS anti-competitive?


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#1 Alvas Rawuther

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 02:06 AM

Recently, I had set up my internet connection to use Google's public DNS server because it was the fastest(on avg.) according to the various DNS tests I had done for it against OpenDNS & my own ISP's DNS. For this purpose I used Browsermob's tests.

But here's the deal, when I loaded websites like cnet.download.com, vimeo.com, apple.com - it takes a really long time to load them. And even with other websites, it seemed slow(in my browser).

Is it Google trying to be anti-competitive ?(which I think may not at all be the case)

Is it because of the reasons specified in this article - http://apcmag.com/why-using-google-dns-opendns-is-a-bad-idea.htm ?(which I think very much may be true in my case because I live in India).

Switched back to my ISP's own DNS server. And everything is working snappy now, like earlier. Can anyone explain to me what's going on?
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#2 cryptodan

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 02:14 AM

Like packets and the internet, your DNS Queries could have been taking a longer time to reach google's DNS and your computer browser. I have always been a stickler for people to use their ISP's DNS since they reside on the same network.

#3 Alvas Rawuther

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 04:01 AM

Like packets and the internet, your DNS Queries could have been taking a longer time to reach google's DNS and your computer browser. I have always been a stickler for people to use their ISP's DNS since they reside on the same network.


Yeah, I understand that. So why a much more longer time on some certain websites? :)
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#4 cryptodan

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 01:21 PM

Traffic to and from the DNS Servers for those respective sites, network congestion, and other factors.

#5 NpaMA

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 07:39 PM

I think the main problem people run into when using 3rd party DNS servers is the fact that you are routed to sites that are closest to the DNS server. For example, major sites like Facebook and YouTube have multiple datacenters and route people to their closest datacenter. They do this based on the location of the DNS server. So for example, if you're in Florida and the DNS server you use is in California, then you will probably get routed to servers in the LA region, where normally with ISP-based DNS servers you would stay within the east coast.

Then because of how things are routed, congested links, peering issues, etc. this can cause dramatic slow downs.

#6 Alvas Rawuther

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Posted 16 May 2012 - 05:55 AM

Thanks guys. :)
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Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 | Intel Core 2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz | 4.00 GB Dual-Channel DDR2 @ 333MHz RAM | 488 GB WD SATA HDD | 1024MB ATI Radeon HD 4350 | No real-time antivirus | MBAM on-demand | Windows 7's Built-in Firewall |




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