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I'd Like To Do A New Install Of Win 2000 Os For My Older Pc.advice?


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#1 Marebare

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 08:51 PM

My Win 98SE is still doing OK with my six year old PC, but I'm running into too many programs that aren't written for 98SE anymore: namely my teen's new iPod nano! We had to run to my friend's PC to install the program so she could make her playlist. So, I've been doin some research to buy Win2000 software; there's a deal at Royal Discount.com for a "CD only" full install (as opposed to an update) for only $89.00....quite tempting. I know that I have to store my programs and files before I change OS. I bought a cute little 2.5G external hard drive to store my stuff. But I'm concerned that even if I save my ISP program and reinstall it, would my service be disrupted? Any other problems do you think I might encounter with my clean install, i.e.--be sure to do this-and-such, to make it go more smoothely.
Hey, I know I can depend on you guys and gals for sound advice here.

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#2 acklan

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 09:11 PM

... I've been doin some research to buy Win2000 software; there's a deal at Royal Discount.com for a "CD only" full install (as opposed to an update) for only $89.00....quite tempting.

When you stated "CD Only". It will come with the COA (25 digit key), right?

But I'm concerned that even if I save my ISP program and reinstall it, would my service be disrupted? Any other problems do you think I might encounter with my clean install, i.e.--be sure to do this-and-such, to make it go more smoothely.
Hey, I know I can depend on you guys and gals for sound advice here.

How big is your hard drive? If room allows I would create a second partition so she could save her data there. It will save a lot of head ache if you have to install again.
While you are doing an upgrade (which is a great choice in my opinion) consider some basic hardware upgrades.
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#3 Enthusiast

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 03:14 PM

CD only" full install (as opposed to an update) for only $89.00

Fine - actually preferable to an upgrade, but it must have the COA with the license key.

Make sure you have enough RAM to run it, and that your system will accommodate Win 2k.

Win2k Pro is actually a better op system than XP Home as far as security purposes. I suggest using NTFS rather than Fat32.

If there's a choice when you buy it make sure it contains everything up to Svc Pac 4.

You have to wipe the drive completely to install it.

I always partition my main drive into three partitions. Of course your drive must be large enough to accommodate that with sufficient room on each for it to be beneficial, and put Windows on the first - all third party programs on the second, and all data on the third.

That way if you have to reinstall Windows, which seems necessary from time to time, the other two partitions will be unaffected.

A slave hard drive is even better for keeping everything but Windows on, and you can have the additional advantage of using the slave for the paging file instead of the master drive, which will make it somewhat faster and not fragment your main drive as much.

What do you mean by Isp program"?

If you are on broadband the installation of Win 2k Pro will discover the connection automatically.

Edited by Enthusiast, 26 February 2006 - 03:18 PM.


#4 Marebare

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 09:25 AM

"CD only" specifies CD only with Key. I assume that means the 25 digit key Acklan is referring to. Why is the COA key so vital? I mean, what's it good for?
I did review all the system requirements, and my system is well within the limits. Still not good enough for an install of XP, but from what y'all are talking about, I wouldn't want it anyway...
My only major prob is that my 10G hard drive has about only 1G of free memory left on it, mostly due to digital photos (my teen likes to think she's a budding photographer) and I have no CD-R to burn'em to. I could clean out a lot of my old programs and files, but that leaves the pics problem; which is why I bought the little external hard drive. Get them off my C: drive!
Hmm... partitioning the hard drive. That's news to me. As I look up the topic in my "Win 98 for Dummies", it states that 'FDISK tends to wipe out portions of the hard drive, so be very careful, and have a recent backup of the drives contents before you begin.' ..and.. "after you create a partition with FDISK, you must reboot and format the partition to either FAT16 or FAT32 file system." ..."partitions can be either two types--primary (active or boot partition) or extended.
Well folks, since I haven't converted my file system from FAT16 to FAT32, why should I bother?
This all gettin' a little over my head. And I'm fat enough!

#5 Enthusiast

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 10:09 AM

The COA is the actual license that authenticates genuine Microsoft software. If you are buying the op system from a reputable company, it is probably an OEM version and ok, but check carefully.

Well, the desired and recommended file system for Win 2k is NTFS. It will run on Fat32 but not as efficiently and you will loose some important security features and op system capabilities.

Hard drives are relatively cheap nowadays and you could get a much larger one than a 10gig to install as the main drive and keep the 10 gig as a slave, (a 6 year old hd is way past its expected life anyway) but the truth of the matter is you could buy a new, commercially built computer with a much larger hard drive, a great deal more processing power than the one you have and Windows XP Home preinstalled on it for around $300 which is not a lot more than the cost of the op system you found and a hard drive to upgrade the computer you have, and you will have new technology instead of the obsolete technology that is in the one you currently are trying to upgrade. You also might run into compatability issues with the old peripherals not having Win2k drivers available and so they would have to be replaced too. (happened to me when I upgraded an old machine to Win2k from Win98 SE - my printer and scanner did not have drivers available). Many of your old programs may not work well either. Win 98 is really obsolete and so are the computers that came with it.

You probably will need more RAM, and it is an obsolete type too.

Now, the $300 computer wouldn't be the biggest, baddest puter out there, but still far better than what you have.

#6 dc3

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 01:15 AM

One other option for saving the pictures would be to store them on a CD or DVD, as you have found out pictures take up a lot of space.

Ultimately...I have to agree with Enthusiast, your computer is not worth investing in, you would be far better off spending you money on a new machine. Your computer is at the age where parts start failing.

You also might want to check with you local computer shop for a copy of W2k Pro, I was given a copy with the product code.

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#7 acklan

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Posted 13 March 2006 - 01:29 AM

Here is what dc3 and Enthusiast are talking about.

Dell

HP

Gateway
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#8 randyrayd

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 02:45 PM

Marebare, I had the exact same problem (98-2+kid's ipod) and tried in vane to upgrade to win2k pro and couldn't do it. Although I had used the CD to upgrade my laptop from W98 successfully. I flashed my BIOS and updated all the drivers, had plenty of RAM and drive space, did everything I was supposed to, but I would only get to the first reboot of the install and then, nothing.....the screen would go black and wouldn't respond to anything. Only a utility called GoBack would recover (although scanreg /restore might have worked).

I can't explain why I couldn't upgrade this time, when I did so with the laptop, but thought you might like to know of the problem.

Randall

Edited by randyrayd, 15 March 2006 - 02:46 PM.


#9 Enthusiast

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 06:01 PM

The motherboards and bios on older computers that preexisted Win 2K and were not capable of running NT could not run Win2K either.

#10 randyrayd

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 06:18 PM

That explains my situation. My desktop mobo was 8 years old although the processor had been upgraded.

Marebare, you may have the same problem, since your dinosaur is 6 years old.

Thanks,
Randall

#11 Marebare

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 07:55 PM

Well, I bit the bullet and bought a less expensive Dell desktop (the B### series) and it seem to work OK. She seems happy with it. So, I guess I may as well leave Win 98SE on my old system; the hard drive still hasn't crashed yet, so granny PC is still chuggin' along.
My only criticism with the new PC is this: Why is my dial-up ISP quite adequate for my old PC (115,000 bps) but downright pokey on my new PC? (59,000 bps) Same program and service. This slooowww speed is problematic for downloads (slow as molasses in winter) and the ISP bumps off the connection as 'inactive'. What gives? Must I change my ISP to DSL service?
And, I'm upset with iTunes. To intially get a playlist for my kid's ipod, I had to resort to a friend's PC, then when I loaded iTunes on to my new PC, got new songs and upgraded, the old playlist from my friends PC was wiped out. Hey, I paid for those songs! I'm gonna have to contact them and ask what gives...

#12 acklan

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 08:06 PM

Alot of cable and DSL provider have Lite packages. 256/128 for $25/mo. You may want to look into that. Depending on your provider you may be abl to upgrade with your current ISP.
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#13 Rimmer

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 09:06 PM

Make sure your shiny new computer has one good Anti-virus program, one good firewall (turn the Windows one off) and a bunch of anti-spyware applications to protect it. See the BC compendium of Recommended Freeware for examples.

Have a look in the Tutorials section for ways to keep your system secure on the internet and what to do before you connect:

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/Ste...rnet-tut86.html

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/Sim...rnet-tut82.html

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#14 randyrayd

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Posted 25 March 2006 - 09:32 PM

Rimmer, thank you for the advice. I was wondering how good the XP firewall was. I'm pretty confident about everything else, but now feel I should have ZoneAlarm as opposed to the XP firewall.

Advice/opinions?

rd

#15 Enthusiast

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Posted 26 March 2006 - 10:04 AM

Absolutely!

The Win XP firewall only protects against incoming threats and does nothing to warn you of trojans, phonehomes, autodialers which will call 900 numbers and run up tremendous phone bills (especially if you are on dialup with a telephone line connected to your computer), etc.

Zone Alarm's freeware product will give you protection against both incoming AND outgoing threats and exposures.

You should be able to get basic broadband (for $15 per month. If your local sources do not offer this price, Yahoo and other national companies do.

Be aware though, speed is addictive! You will soon be upgrading to higher speed broadband if it is available in your area.

Edited by Enthusiast, 26 March 2006 - 10:26 AM.





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