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YouTube videos embedded in Facebook are not playing when in HTTPS


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#16 Alvas Rawuther

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 02:34 AM

Sophos has a good Facebook security guide which is well worth a read: Sophos Facebook Best Practices

Also, if your OS is either Vista or Windows 7, the next version of Flash will include a sandbox for Firefox: Flash 11.3 includes Protected Mode for Firefox Unfortunately though, Protected Mode won't be available for Windows XP users.

It's currently in its third BETA stage if you want to give it a go: Flash 11.3 BETA

If I come across a fix for your problem though, I'll add it to this thread.

Thanks a lot for your help, friend. It really helps. I read the guide too. :)

Also, if you could help me with my previous question...

BTW, I'm not really connected to any other computers and sharing files with them so I'm not really in a network. I use cable broadband and have my firewall setting as public for it. So, how much really is the risk if I start using an http(non-secure, unencrypted) connection for facebook. And would it really matter? Since before facebook introduced this feature, I and everyone else used an unencrypted http connection, no?


Kind Regards. :)
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#17 Guest_Xircal_*

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 05:28 AM

Hi there,

In Firefox, you can install an add-on called Dr. Web Linkchecker which I use myself. Besides checking it for viruses, you can also see where an obfuscated link in Facebook is going to take you. It's an added safety precaution in the dangerous digital world we find ourselves in today.

Also, VTZilla is another add-on which you can use to scan a link for viruses, or scan a file before you download it, or even scan the site you're already on.

Another one I often enable when I don't trust the site even though it may come up clean in the above two add-ons is QuickJS This enables you to disable/enable Javascript on the fly. Practically all malware needs Javascript to run and disabling it affords you better protection if you're going to venture into the unknown. Some links won't work with it enabled, but most bona fide sites don't need it. In Google, the cursor won't jump to the search field automatically if Javascript is disabled, but links work just fine. But if you go to a site and it tells you, you must enable Javascript in order to see a picture, forget it and go somewhere else because it could be one of these: http://krebsonsecurity.com/2011/05/scammers-swap-google-images-for-malware/

SSL (https) encrypts data so that it can't be viewed by a man-in-the-middle attack, but provided you're not going to be using your credit card online, you should be perfectly OK with http sites provided you exercise caution and don't click something on an unknown site without scanning the site first.

#18 Alvas Rawuther

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 09:59 AM

Hi there,

In Firefox, you can install an add-on called Dr. Web Linkchecker which I use myself. Besides checking it for viruses, you can also see where an obfuscated link in Facebook is going to take you. It's an added safety precaution in the dangerous digital world we find ourselves in today.

Also, VTZilla is another add-on which you can use to scan a link for viruses, or scan a file before you download it, or even scan the site you're already on.

Another one I often enable when I don't trust the site even though it may come up clean in the above two add-ons is QuickJS This enables you to disable/enable Javascript on the fly. Practically all malware needs Javascript to run and disabling it affords you better protection if you're going to venture into the unknown. Some links won't work with it enabled, but most bona fide sites don't need it. In Google, the cursor won't jump to the search field automatically if Javascript is disabled, but links work just fine. But if you go to a site and it tells you, you must enable Javascript in order to see a picture, forget it and go somewhere else because it could be one of these: http://krebsonsecurity.com/2011/05/scammers-swap-google-images-for-malware/

SSL (https) encrypts data so that it can't be viewed by a man-in-the-middle attack, but provided you're not going to be using your credit card online, you should be perfectly OK with http sites provided you exercise caution and don't click something on an unknown site without scanning the site first.


Thank you. Thanks a lot. :D

Edited by Alvas Rawuther, 09 May 2012 - 09:59 AM.

SYSTEM SPECS.
Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 | Intel Core 2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93GHz | 4.00 GB Dual-Channel DDR2 @ 333MHz RAM | 488 GB WD SATA HDD | 1024MB ATI Radeon HD 4350 | No real-time antivirus | MBAM on-demand | Windows 7's Built-in Firewall |

#19 Guest_Xircal_*

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 10:08 AM

You're welcome.




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