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Virtual Memory decision to increase


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#1 cafejose

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 12:35 AM

The old laptop is slow and sometimes while doing things on the internet, becomes very slow or a browser gets stuck. I'm guessing if the machine had more memory, it would become stuck less often, maybe even be faster while on the internet. I would like to first try increasing virtual memory, but not sure exactly what value to choose.

Here are some details:
Windows XP, service pack 3.
2.0 GHz processor, 512 RAM.
18463 mb free disk space. Virtual Memory: 768 mb initial, 1536 mb maximum

Edited by cafejose, 02 May 2012 - 12:35 AM.


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#2 noknojon

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 01:07 AM

System manufacturer and model ?

This way we can tell you the maximum RAM to install and sometimes the preferred brand -

Thank You -

#3 cafejose

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 03:10 AM

The aim is VIRTUAL MEMORY. I'm not (or not yet) interested in installing hardware memory,

System manufacturer and model ?

This way we can tell you the maximum RAM to install and sometimes the preferred brand -

Thank You -


but to give the information you ask for, Toshiba Satellite 1415-S115.

#4 Union_Thug

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 04:32 AM

@ noknojon: Unfortunately this is a very old model and can only support 512mb RAM maximum:

http://reviews.cnet.com/laptops/toshiba-satellite-1415-s115/1707-3121_7-31001078.html
http://www.memorystock.com/memory/ToshibaSatellite1415S115.html

Hope this helps.Posted Image

#5 Union_Thug

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 04:43 AM

@ cafejose: Google is your friend: How to manually change the size of virtual memory page file Posted Image

Scroll to How to manually change the size of the virtual memory paging file

Edited by Union_Thug, 02 May 2012 - 04:43 AM.


#6 noknojon

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 04:44 AM

Microsoft Windows XP - Change the size of the virtual memory

About all I got left ............................... :mellow:


#7 Platypus

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 08:49 AM

Unfortunately virtual memory is vastly slower than RAM, and giving access to more very slow memory space won't speed the system up. The virtual memory setting is already quite high, with its current minimum being the commonly recommended 1.5x physical RAM and the maximum already set to 3x.

In the absence of any way to increase the RAM complement, the best performance improver will be to run as lean as possible. Make sure as little unnecessary stuff as possible is being loaded up into Windows and avoid using bloated & inefficient software - try different browsers. Keep the hard drive defragmented.

Also be certain there isn't any undetected malware, or things that sap your bandwidth when online, like unnecessary toolbars that fetch advertising.

Another possible problem with a system of that age is the hard drive might be developing a high error rate, which provokes pausing and stalling while the drive does re-reads. A hard drive testing utility can show this problem up - it was the cause of stalling with my old Compaq when the 40GB HDD showed high errors in the S.M.A.R.T report.

Edited by Platypus, 02 May 2012 - 08:51 AM.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.

#8 Guest_Xircal_*

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 11:24 AM

A few things you can do which might help.

  • Click Start, then Run (or hit Windows logo key+R), type cleanmgr and click OK.
  • Click OK in the next menu since C: is already selected. Windows will calculate how much space you can save, so be patient.
  • Checkmark all the boxes except the bottom two which are to "Compress All Files" and "Catalog files for the Indexer".
  • Click OK and then confirm that you want to delete everything else by clicking "Yes".
  • If your hard disk is partitioned, repeat the same steps except to change the drive letter from "C:" to your other drive.
  • You presumably have antivirus. You might want to consider disabling some of the scanners that most modern AV apps incorporate these days. So open the configuration menu for it and then review which ones you don't really need like Internet monitoring. This will save your precious memory and speed things up a little.
  • Disable the many Windows XP custom features that drain memory. To do that, press Windows logo key + Pause/Break to take you to System Properties.
  • Click the Advanced tab and then click the Settings button at the top in the "Performance" menu.
  • Click the "Custom" button and then remove the checkmark from everything except those that you see in the screenshot. This is the way I have my own machine set up and believe me, it does make a difference.
  • Disable Windows sounds. After all, are all those beeps and squeaks really necessary? You'll find these via Start | Settings | Control Panel | Sounds and Audio Devices | Sounds (tab). The less time your CPU has to spend making all these little noises, the more power it has to do other more important things.
Finally, how often do you do a cold boot? That means shutdown the PC and power off completely by either switching off the PSU on the back of the machine, or removing the power cord. Shutting down in this manner flushes the system memory which otherwise will become clogged.

Let me know how you get on.

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#9 RevGAM

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 03:51 PM

Just wanted to throw in a few points. I've just upgraded my XP machine from 512 MB to 1GB and what a difference it made! If you can't downgrade to W98 Final/W ME, you can't upgrade your memory and you can't buy a better machine, the advice to run lean is very important.

Fine-tuning the machine to minimize running programs (in the background), turning off the features that make XP look slicker (the mouse cursor and desktop picture, for example). You can get rid of jqs.exe, for example, and there are other unimportant programs running.

As already pointed out, you should also use the slimmest browser you can find for XP, and make sure to turn off any extensions and add-ons in it that are NOT critical - they use up a ton of memory. You can also delete the Internet cache (a record of all the websites you've visited) from options/tools, defragment your hard disk drive (available from start>all programs>accessories>system tools or download Piriform's Defraggler or IOBit's Defrag), and run checkdisk (from the command prompt in accessories, or start>run, type "cmd" [no quotes] enter, then in the command prompt type "chkdsk") to get rid of drive errors.

Ccleaner is a nice utility for removing unneeded temporary files, emptying the recycle bin, and removing other clutter from the hard drive before you run checkdisk and defragment. Disk cleanup (mentioned by Xircal) is also in system tools.

If you need to know how to perform any of these tasks, please ask.

Hope that helps!

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


#10 Guest_Xircal_*

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 03:00 AM

Ccleaner is a nice utility for removing unneeded temporary files, emptying the recycle bin, and removing other clutter from the hard drive before you run checkdisk and defragment. Disk cleanup (mentioned by Xircal) is also in system tools.

Contrary to the advice RevGAM gave you which was well-intentioned I'm sure, I would advise you not to use CCleaner. This application dates from the stoneage i.e. the Windows 95 era when registry cleaners were all the rage. They're superfluous in Windows XP which incorporates all the tools necessary to deal with simple tasks like deleting temp files etc. Similarly, allowing a third party tool to delete registry keys (which CCleaner can do) is just asking for trouble and you could end up with a machine which won't even boot anymore.

#11 Allan

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 06:45 AM

There's no harm in using ccleaner to delete files - as long as you don't use the registry cleaning module it's fine. On the other hand, I agree it's essentially useless. Aside from the fact you can easily delete files from the temp folder manually, there's noting to be gained from file deletion or uninstalling programs unless the hard drive is close to full. If there is sufficient free space on the hd, deleting files and uninstalling programs will not effect performance in the least.

#12 RevGAM

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 12:10 PM


Ccleaner is a nice utility for removing unneeded temporary files, emptying the recycle bin, and removing other clutter from the hard drive before you run checkdisk and defragment. Disk cleanup (mentioned by Xircal) is also in system tools.

Contrary to the advice RevGAM gave you which was well-intentioned I'm sure, I would advise you not to use CCleaner. This application dates from the stoneage i.e. the Windows 95 era when registry cleaners were all the rage. They're superfluous in Windows XP which incorporates all the tools necessary to deal with simple tasks like deleting temp files etc. Similarly, allowing a third party tool to delete registry keys (which CCleaner can do) is just asking for trouble and you could end up with a machine which won't even boot anymore.


I guess I'll just have to contradict you, my friend. :)

Ccleaner is only about 8.5 years old - hardly "stoneage" - and is regularly updated by Piriform. Here's a brief Wikipedia article: Ccleaner. Perhaps you are thinking of Regcleaner instead?

I have found it to be superior to the WXP (and even W7) tools in removing built up crap on my HDD, something removing significant amounts of stuff AFTER having run disk cleanup. I've been using it since around 2007 and have been pleased with it. Even though I use less than the default "safe" settings, I still manage to clean up a lot of stuff - with an empty recycle bin and having cleaned out the Internet cache no less!

In addition, I have heard from some experts here and elsewhere who routinely use Ccleaner and recommend it. While other people may prefer IOBit's tool Advanced System Cleaner (something like that) for cleaning up the whole system, that package deal includes a registry cleaner in the one-click system cleanup solution, so I don't recommend it.

You may not have noticed it, but I did NOT suggest that he use the registry cleaning function, nor would I as many experts say the use of automated registry cleaning tools is a bad idea. Some people have used Ccleaner's registry cleaner with no ill effects, and it does offer registry backup prior to working on it. Nevertheless, it's better off left alone.

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


#13 RevGAM

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 12:19 PM

There's no harm in using ccleaner to delete files - as long as you don't use the registry cleaning module it's fine. On the other hand, I agree it's essentially useless. Aside from the fact you can easily delete files from the temp folder manually, there's noting to be gained from file deletion or uninstalling programs unless the hard drive is close to full. If there is sufficient free space on the hd, deleting files and uninstalling programs will not effect performance in the least.


If the OP is good at manual temp file removal, sure, otherwise Ccleaner beats "cleanmgr" aka Disk Cleanup handily - even if you reduce the default selections.

Given the limitations of the laptop (512 MB RAM maximum!), I'd be willing to bet the OP has a small HDD and is short on space, which WILL affect not only performance and virtual memory, but also defragmentation time (especially if you use Window's Disk Defragmenter!). If this is true, the OP should also not increase virtual memory, right?

A highly fragmented drive will affect I/O access times, and I assume that there'll be a knock-on effect for VM, further slowing down an already sluggish beasty.

If maintenance hasn't been performed (chkdsk and defrag), or the recycle bin, temp files and Internet cache haven't been emptied, then those are also factors that will increase drag, giving an unpleasant experience for the OP, hence my support of Xircal's recommendation to clean things up.

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


#14 Guest_Xircal_*

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 12:39 PM



Ccleaner is a nice utility for removing unneeded temporary files, emptying the recycle bin, and removing other clutter from the hard drive before you run checkdisk and defragment. Disk cleanup (mentioned by Xircal) is also in system tools.

Contrary to the advice RevGAM gave you which was well-intentioned I'm sure, I would advise you not to use CCleaner. This application dates from the stoneage i.e. the Windows 95 era when registry cleaners were all the rage. They're superfluous in Windows XP which incorporates all the tools necessary to deal with simple tasks like deleting temp files etc. Similarly, allowing a third party tool to delete registry keys (which CCleaner can do) is just asking for trouble and you could end up with a machine which won't even boot anymore.


I guess I'll just have to contradict you, my friend. :)

Ccleaner is only about 8.5 years old - hardly "stoneage" - and is regularly updated by Piriform. Here's a brief Wikipedia article: Ccleaner. Perhaps you are thinking of Regcleaner instead?

I have found it to be superior to the WXP (and even W7) tools in removing built up crap on my HDD, something removing significant amounts of stuff AFTER having run disk cleanup. I've been using it since around 2007 and have been pleased with it. Even though I use less than the default "safe" settings, I still manage to clean up a lot of stuff - with an empty recycle bin and having cleaned out the Internet cache no less!

In addition, I have heard from some experts here and elsewhere who routinely use Ccleaner and recommend it. While other people may prefer IOBit's tool Advanced System Cleaner (something like that) for cleaning up the whole system, that package deal includes a registry cleaner in the one-click system cleanup solution, so I don't recommend it.

You may not have noticed it, but I did NOT suggest that he use the registry cleaning function, nor would I as many experts say the use of automated registry cleaning tools is a bad idea. Some people have used Ccleaner's registry cleaner with no ill effects, and it does offer registry backup prior to working on it. Nevertheless, it's better off left alone.

You're entitled to your opinion of course, but I'll stick to my guns. And why you might ask? Because if you check the registry after you've run CCleaner, you'll find countless keys which remain in place. That utility only removes so called 'safe keys' in the HKLM hive. It leaves all the others firmly intact.

I can even prove it to you too if you like. Go to http://www.cocoonsoftware.com/ and install "Quick Media Converter". You might even find it useful and may want to keep it, but for purposes of this experiment, go to Add/Remove Programs and remove it. Reboot as is customary after uninstalling a program and then run CCleaner.

When you've finished with that, go to this site and then check the registry for all the locations mentioned there which should have been deleted and you'll find them all happily sitting there still. And when you've done that, do a registry asearch for Actecom because that's the developer for QMC and you'll find many more references to utility hanging around.

It'll be the same story with many other apps you've uininstalled and have supposedly cleaned out of your registry. You're just being hoodwinked if you believe CCleaner does what it says on the tin. :blink:

#15 Allan

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 12:52 PM

♠♦

I can even prove it to you too if you like. Go to http://www.cocoonsoftware.com/ and install "Quick Media Converter". You might even find it useful and may want to keep it, but for purposes of this experiment, go to Add/Remove Programs and remove it. Reboot as is customary after uninstalling a program and then run CCleaner.

When you've finished with that, go to this site and then check the registry for all the locations mentioned there which should have been deleted and you'll find them all happily sitting there still. And when you've done that, do a registry asearch for Actecom because that's the developer for QMC and you'll find many more references to utility hanging around.

It'll be the same story with many other apps you've uininstalled and have supposedly cleaned out of your registry. You're just being hoodwinked if you believe CCleaner does what it says on the tin. :blink:


With all due respect - while what you say is true about ccleaner finding and removing orphan registry entries, it's an irrelevant procedure. It does absolutely no good. Those entries cause no harm and have zero effect on performance. There is NO good reason to ever use ANY registry cleaner - including the ccleaner module. Additionally, deleting files from your temp folder is quite easily done without the use of a third party utility.




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