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Strange network problems


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#1 Smiling Hobo

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 01:15 AM

My brother's computer randomly loses connection to the network, it seems to happen for no reason, but possibly more often/sooner when demanding more from the network (downloads, playing a game, etc). Now the thing is he doesn't just lose internet connection, but connection to the network entirely. He cannot even access the router by typing the IP into the browser. If anybody can give me some help on this issue it would be greatly appreciated, thanks.


We have already tried virus scanners (Vipre, Comodo) changing the network cable, Ipconfig /[flushdns, release+renew], disabling media sharing, and various other things..

Computer is running on windows 7
Wired connection, not sure what its called but the ethernet cable goes into an adapter of sorts that connects to a regular wall socket, which I used to use for my computer so I don't think that's the problem unless it is a new development.

Edited by hamluis, 23 April 2012 - 01:45 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Networking-Hamluis.


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#2 coxchris

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 09:25 AM

Try to ping the local loop back address of 127.0.0.1

There is a new threat out I don't know if its related. DNS Chager Click http://www.dns-ok.us/ to see if its infected. It may not be infected.

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#3 Smiling Hobo

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 12:15 PM

Yep it pings ok after the connection is lost. And when pinging the router (192.168.1.254) while he has a network connection everything is good. But after the connection is lost we get request timed out. To be expected probably but figured that might help skip a step.

And yeah I thought that could be it before but he shows green on that website so I suppose not.

Oh and a little more info here, we use AT&T Uverse, router is a 2wire 3800HGV-B

#4 Baltboy

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 01:13 PM

Are you talking about an adapter that plugs directly into the electrical socket? It is called powerline networking. Depending on the version you have they can be affected by voltage variations and wire degredation. Could be that the adapter itself is failing. It might only show more during heavy usage because the internal heat of the device increases exacerbating the fault. If possible i would try using a cable directly to the router and see if that works. If so you can be almost certain it is one of the powerline devices.
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#5 Smiling Hobo

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 07:24 PM

Yeah it's a "Plug Link, By Asoka". But that's what it does. The AT&T guy that set up our internet in the first place gave them to us a couple of years ago. I tried using another one that I know works, seemed to be doing well at first. But it eventually cut off as well. And connecting directly to the router would be pretty tricky, computer is upstairs, router is down. You think it could be the wall socket its self? His computer is connected to the socket through a power-strip though so I doubt it otherwise I would assume that we would see other issues.

#6 Baltboy

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 01:59 PM

Certain wiring issues and voltage variations that would not affect the computer electrically might affect the powerline networking. Also there should be two adapters, one at the computer, one near the router. Either one could be having issue so try replacing the other adapter by the router.

As a second solution the router you have includes wireless G which will give you pretty much the same speeds you were getting with the Plug Link adapter if the computer inquestion has wireless capability.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#7 sumguy#1

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 06:02 PM

'Smiling Hobo'

The AT&T guy that set up our internet in the first place gave them to us a couple of years ago. I tried using another one that I know works, seemed to be doing well at first. But it eventually cut off as well.

sumguy: I was looking into these power line adapters yesterday for my network. It appears these devices work well, but appear to be iffy or susceptible for various reasons, according to reviews on Amazon.

And connecting directly to the router would be pretty tricky, computer is upstairs, router is down.

R. Trendnet.com sells these products and makes a wireless plug type adapter for individual rooms.

You think it could be the wall socket its self?

R. If there is a indicator light on the adapter, then this would tell you if it works or not. Or plug a lamp into the socket, see if it works, if so, then it is something else.

His computer is connected to the socket through a power-strip.

R. Trendnet recommends plugging the power line adapter directly into the wall, no power strip. I presume this is because you are using the house wiring as the connection source and the power strip interferes with the house wiring source.

Could also be that maybe he is on a different electrical circuit than down stairs where the plug adapter is. If so, maybe that could be a potential problem? Might want to check to see if you guys are on the same circuit? If not, try temporally placing the power line adapter in his room, then hook it to his computer, see if that works?

I believe these adapters should be in the same room as the computer. The power line adapter gets plugged into a wall outlet, then Ethernet from the power line adapter to the computer. Or unless you get a wireless power line plug adapter in his individual room or the individual rooms that have computers.

The downloadable installation guides on TRENDnet have troubleshooting info that can give you a good bit of info on this issue and might help.




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