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CPU Upgrade in P5N32-SLI Premium Board


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#1 ComputerPower

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:02 PM

Greetings,

I have a system built on a P5N32-SLI Premium motherboard, that decided it was no longer going to POST. I troubleshooted one component at a time, until finally I found a failed processor. Failed CPU is a P4 3.4ghz. I had a spare Socket 775 Celeron 2.66 lying around, and the system will post and boot to Windows correctly with this chip.

Since the Celeron is a significant downgrade, I checked the compatible processor list http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/mb-ASUS/P5N32-SLI_Premium.html and ordered a E6600 dual core. Upon receiving it, I installed the CPU and am back to no POST. I put the Celeron back in, got into the BIOS, and upgraded the BIOS to the most recent version, even though the compatibilitty list said I shouldn't have had to. Still no POST with the E6600.

Started researching, and found out to my annoyance that a "Core 2 Duo E6600" and a "Pentium Dual Core E6600" are not the same thing. Screw you, Intel. My board will support the Core 2 Duo, but not the other one. So I will put the Celeron back in and limp along with that until I can get a better chip. Problem solved, right?

Wrong. Now it won't POST with the Celeron either. I have a second Socket 775 Celeron cpu that I know works. It won't POST with that either. I found and installed a E6400 that was working in a different computer last week (the correct Core 2 Duo version, I checked). No POST with that either. I popped out the CMOS battery to clear that, no effect.

I have a spare Socket 775 Motherboard out of a Dell, again that I know was booting to Windows last week. None of these 4 CPU's will POST in that motherboard either. Including the E6400 that I pulled out of that motherboard last week.

In a word, what the hell is going on? Did I fry the motherboard by putting in an incompatible chip, and now its frying any CPU I install into it? I'm running out of ideas.

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#2 the_patriot11

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 12:16 AM

are you sure the motherboard is fully functional, is it possible something in the socket is shorting out the CPUs?

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Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

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#3 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 07:49 AM

A few months ago, I had a system that literally fried any memory placed in it's sockets (as in melted off the label!) and what had happened is that the capacitor for the ram's power supply had gone bad, taking out the mosfet transistor which regulated the voltage so that any dimm was fed a full 3.3 volts.
I'll bet money that a close inspection of the caps and mosfets around that CPU socket will reveal a similar issue (mosfets look like black rectangles with two larger leads and a stub on one side)and you have cooked those CPU's by supplying the wrong voltages.
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#4 ComputerPower

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 02:04 PM

Visual inspection of the capacitors and chips around the CPU area doesn't show anything out of the ordinary. And it was working just fine right up until I updated the BIOS and installed the incompatible CPU. Using a stock Intel 775 cooler, the install process doesn't exactly take much technical skill, its nothing I haven't done a hundred times before.

Have spoken to three different support guys at Asus, all of whom gave me some variation of "wow, I've never heard of a problem like this before."

#5 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 02:45 PM

Unfortunately, the mosfets for the CPU power supplies are under the heatsinks between the CPU and back panel connectors & between the CPU and power supply. On any other systemboard, I would have told you to put in the original 3.4Ghz CPU, turn it on, then use your fingers to see if one of the mosfets was getting very hot (carefully; they can get hot enough to burn quite fast!)
On yours, those heatsinks would have to come off first (though that might reveal one with a burn mark or a hole in the top)
Here is a reasonably high res picture: http://www.pcinlife.com/article_photo/core2/p5n32_sli/asus_p5n32_sli-01.jpg
You can see three of the mosfets to the left of the memory slots and here is what they look like: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOSFET (2nd pic down on right side)
Part of this becomes academic; though, as not many have the soldering skills to replace the mosfets and you still have a bunch of fried CPU's!
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#6 ComputerPower

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 03:01 PM

So in short: Fried Motherboard, and nothing short of component-level repair on the board, plus a new CPU, is going to get it working again? And most likely those 4 CPU's we've used to test this system are fried as well.

I'd pretty much already reached that conclusion myself. I was just hoping someone might have an answer with better news, because that conclusion is expensive.

#7 DavisMcCarn

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 04:49 PM

Yup and I'm sorry; but, stuff happens, huh?
P.S. ASUS is on my very short blacklist of products not to buy. I have to get their laptop parts from Europe and their warranty s*cks.
Gigabyte makes the best systemboards.
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#8 the_patriot11

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 06:23 PM

I use ASUS and gigabyte all the time. ASUS customer support is somewhat lacking, but ive had no problem with their quality. It is a proven fact that even from the best manufacturers, there is 3-4% of all their products leave the factory defective, its a fact of life, and that includes both ASUS and gigabyte. THat is a bummer about your board, hope you can find another reasonably cheap.

picard5.jpg

 

Primary system: Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB3, Processor: AMD Phenom II x4 945, Memory: 16 gigs of Patriot G2 DDR3 1600, Video: AMD Sapphire Nitro R9 380, Storage: 1 WD 500 gig HD, 1 Hitachi 500 gig HD, and Power supply: Coolermaster 750 watt, OS: Windows 10 64 bit. 

Media Center: Motherboard: Gigabyte mp61p-S3, Processor: AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+, Memory: 6 gigs Patriot DDR2 800, Video: Gigabyte GeForce GT730, Storage: 500 gig Hitachi, PSU: Seasonic M1211 620W full modular, OS: Windows 10.

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.


#9 rotor123

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Posted 24 April 2012 - 11:20 AM

Did you check to see if there was warranty left on the Motherboard?

My experience is totally different with regards to ASUS motherboards. They are all I use for My own and family builds.

Where I was working we had sold a system with an ASUS motherboard and it came back later with dead USB ports. it was replaced two or three times under warranty buy ASUS. The problem was traced back to a defective USB device killing the ports, when the customer identified which device it was and stopped using it the USB ports kept working.

Edited by rotor123, 24 April 2012 - 11:22 AM.

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#10 ComputerPower

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 11:37 AM

In my experience the ASUS website is slow and buggy, their driver support lacking, and their tech support incompetent.

In this case, our client brought the computer to us, we would never have sold him a system with an ASUS board. I was told by their support that the board is out of warranty. I was further told that I couldn't send it in for repair even if I wanted to, they no longer have parts for that model.




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