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Dual-boot Windows and Ubuntu


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16 replies to this topic

#1 mania12

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:43 AM

I've been a Windows user all my life, but I think I'm now ready to commit the time and effort to learn how to use Linux. It may not be the most user-friendly OS but I want to learn my way through. For those who have used both of these before, what are your opinions on such an attempt by a user who has limited knowledge of computers?

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#2 1002 Richard S

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 12:26 PM

I'd say try Ubuntu as it's very stable and well-supported so help at hand. Run a 'live CD' first of all to see if all your hardware works OK. Remember though, running from 'live CD' will be a lot slower than an install. In live CD mode you get a choice of try or install - stick with try unless you really mean to install! Guide: http://ubuntu.paslah.com/ubuntu-live-cddvdusb/

You can install Ubuntu within Windows as you would install any other programme to try it. You use 'Wubi' = Windows Ubuntu Installer. If you get on OK with that, try a dual boot. Wubi guide: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide

Before installing in dual boot remember to back up all your docs, pics, tunes etc to external media - just in case!! W7/Ubuntu dual boot guide: http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/9059/dual-boot-your-pre-installed-windows-7-computer-with-ubuntu/

Hope these help?

#3 A Future Pilot

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:37 PM

I personally would suggest Linux Mint: http://linuxmint.com/ It's based on Ubuntu but IMO is much better in alot of ways.

And I think you'll be surprised at how user-friendly it can be! :) (Obviously not always...but then again neither is Windows ;)

Edited by A Future Pilot, 16 April 2012 - 07:37 PM.


#4 rburkartjo

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 09:05 PM

i would also install linux mint if you want to dual-boot. think it is much easier for beginners to use than ubuntu.
quote:He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows,nor judge all he sees.'

#5 1002 Richard S

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 01:46 PM

Mint is very well thought of and all the links I posted apply to Mint as much as they do for Ubuntu. I think Wubi for Mint is called Mint4Win. That's the great part of Linux - loads of choice!!

#6 mania12

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 05:07 PM

Alright cool! I'll give that a try. Thanks for the advice :thumbup2:

#7 cosmic_sniper05

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 12:17 AM

Count another vote for Linux Mint :thumbup2:

I don't see any problem if you would do a dual boot. You could always seek help from the Linux community, here, or google your way around things. Once you've started your endeavor, you may find the IRC as a very good source of quick support from fellow users.
Let's have a mental fusion!
Let us do our part to make this world a truly symbiotic place.

For other computer problems, this blog might be helpful:
http://cosmicsniper.blogspot.com

#8 Ramchu

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 04:31 PM

I would recommend PCLinuxOS KDE

Very stable and is well supported at their forum and it is also rolling release.

Edited by Ramchu, 29 April 2012 - 04:32 PM.


#9 anothercletus

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 02:33 AM

i would recommend ubuntu over the others and i think you'll find it's much more user friendly than you thought. mint's always let me down for new users and pclinuxOS is kind of cool but i'd stay away from kde unless you just don't like yourself very much. though to be fair to KDE they have a lot of feature rich software and it's been a while since i gave it a new try:) i would also recommend forgoing the wubi and just install as dual boot. but...read more about partitions,dual booting, grub and how to prepare your current version of windows than you would prefer to and you should be fine. If you've been using your windows install for a while i'd backup your data and install that old blue dog again fresh first. that way if you use your boontoo for surfing and you disable the network adapter on your winblows install it will stay cleaner over time as i'm sure you've already got all the software conflicts figured out.

#10 Bezukhov

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 08:33 AM

I just tried Linux Mint 13 and was very disappointed. The Software Installer didn't work properly, and it wouldn't shut down. Not that I am giving up on Linux, I will be looking at some other distros.

And I hope you have a recovery disc for your Windows OS, mania12. And remember this command:

Bootrec.exe/ fixmbr

Edited by Bezukhov, 24 May 2012 - 08:35 AM.

To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#11 unknownvariable

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 10:12 AM

Ignore Bezukhov, you shouldn't need to fix the boot sector unless you do something very very wrong XD - and besides, modern distros will add an entry for Windows in their bootmenu.

What you want to do to get started is to either run Linux in a virtual machine or - even easier - just use Ubuntu's "Wubi" installer that puts it in Windows just like any program! You don't need to muck about with partitions and such as it uses a virtual drive - and you choose the Ubuntu option from the Windows boot menu when you start up! Perfect for beginners.

Personally, I would recommend Ubuntu because 12.04's version of the Unity interface is user-friendly while not slow. If you want something more like WIndows, you could install Cinnamon as well as going with the classic GNOME.

#12 DarkSnake-Kobra

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 06:59 PM

I'm using Xubuntu with wubi and so far it's pretty decent. Not too heavy or resource intensive. :)

#13 liquidbroadcast

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 12:33 PM

I am currently using linux.I havn't tried both.Now i think i must.

#14 ronald.teng

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Posted 22 October 2012 - 12:08 AM

Almost all Linux are the same, just stick to the Major Distributor which you can find it at distrowatch.

#15 scurvychef

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 01:30 AM

The installation for most popular Linux distros are pretty user friendly. You really can't screw it up. Backing up your windows might not be a bad idea if you are that concerned about it.

These guys are right: Mint and Ubuntu are your best shots. I find that Ubuntu is more ready to go out of the box. alot of things already configured in the system that I usually have to configure with a new installation. Mint is pretty user friendly though too. You can't go wrong with either. I was hooked on mint for awhile and now am back to Ubuntu.

Ubuntu strongly approaches new users, specifically windows users. You'll see from the first time you boot the disk. You can try it without installing it!




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