Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Can PC's auto-switch off after scans?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 MickinPlymouthUK

MickinPlymouthUK

  • Members
  • 688 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:02 PM

Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:32 PM

Hi,
I've got AVG and Adaware but I can't seem to find an option to make them switch the PC off when they've finished their scans, do they or any other brands have such an option?
That way I could start a scan when i go to bed, snug in the knowledge of knowing it'll switch the PC off an hour or two later on completion.
I'm WinXP Home

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Animal

Animal

    Bleepin' Animinion


  • Site Admin
  • 35,905 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Where You Least Expect Me To Be
  • Local time:01:02 PM

Posted 12 April 2012 - 04:43 PM

I don't want my AV or Anti-Malware deleting something without my consent or acknowledgement. The risk of turning your machine into an expensive door stop with a false-positive just makes me very uncomfortable.

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


Follow BleepingComputer on: Facebook | Twitter | Google+

#3 RedDawn

RedDawn

  • Members
  • 454 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:10:02 PM

Posted 12 April 2012 - 09:01 PM

Mick:

This guide is a little old, but instructions may still apply.

How to shutdown system automatically after AVG scan


Note: Like Animal, I too would be worried about the risk of false-positives. Untick Automatically heal/ remove infections in the scan options to avoid problems.

#4 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,907 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:02 PM

Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:09 PM

You could use a third-party shutdown utility and schedule your machine to turn off at a certain time.

However, for the reasons already stated doing this could be risky. Further, the length of a scan varies with different tools and may be difficult to speculate exactly when the scan will finish in order to calculate the shut down time.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#5 MickinPlymouthUK

MickinPlymouthUK
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 688 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:02 PM

Posted 16 April 2012 - 04:26 PM

Thanks guys, let's see if i've got this right-
Scans might detect something nasty and then at the end of the scan ask us what we want to do with it (remove, ignore, move to vault etc).

Question- how the heck should we know what to do with it? Why can't the scan deal with it itself in the most appropriate way instead of asking us what we want to do with it?
I'm not too PC literate so what do you suggest i do with it? For example why should i want to move anything to the Vault, why can't I just hit 'Remove' or whatever to kill it stone dead?

#6 frankp316

frankp316

  • Members
  • 2,677 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:02 PM

Posted 16 April 2012 - 05:45 PM

What if it's a false positive? If it's automatically deleted, that could cause problems worse than a virus.

#7 Animal

Animal

    Bleepin' Animinion


  • Site Admin
  • 35,905 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Where You Least Expect Me To Be
  • Local time:01:02 PM

Posted 16 April 2012 - 06:30 PM

You quarantine the baddie or you pause the scan. Since you're right there monitoring you can do a quick Google search on the culprit. If you get a lot of negative hits you can be fairly certain it needs to stay quarantined. If in doubt you can post your questions here. I never ever out right remove anything on first scan with an AV or Anti-Malware scanner. I religiously research to make sure it's not part of something I need. Even then I quarantine for several weeks before removing. Making sure I don't get an error from a working application saying that something is missing.

Permanently delete something from a false positive just one time without quarantining. Then have to buy that software again and you learn your lesson with a quickness. :whistle:

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


Follow BleepingComputer on: Facebook | Twitter | Google+

#8 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,907 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:02 PM

Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:33 PM

When an anti-virus or security program quarantines a file and moves it into a virus vault (chest) or a dedicated Quarantine folder, that file is safely held there and no longer a threat. The file is essentially disabled and prevented from causing any harm to your system through proprietary security routines which may copy, rename, encrypt and password protect the file as part of the moving process. Quarantine is just an added safety measure which allows you to view and investigate the files while keeping them from harming your computer.

As Animal notes, one reason for doing this is to prevent deletion of a legitimate file file that may have been flagged as a "false positive" especially if the scanner uses heuristic analysis technology. Heuristics is the ability of a scanning program to detect possible new variants of malware before the vendor can get samples and update the program's definitions for detection. Heuristics uses non-specific detection methods to find new or unknown malware which allows the anti-virus to detect and stop if before doing any harm to your system. The disadvantage to using heuristics is that it is not as reliable as signature-based detection (blacklisting) and can potentially increase the chances that a non-malicious program is flagged as suspicious or infected. If that is the case, then you can restore the file and add it to the exclusion or ignore list. When the quarantined file is known to be malicious, you can delete it at any time by launching the program which removed it, going to the Quarantine tab, and choosing the option to delete.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#9 MickinPlymouthUK

MickinPlymouthUK
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 688 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:02 PM

Posted 18 April 2012 - 12:03 AM

Thanks guys i'd better leave well alone and carry on as before

#10 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,907 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:02 PM

Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:52 AM

You're welcome on behalf of the Bleeping Computer community.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users