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How can I set up a Wireless Router in Reverse?


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10 replies to this topic

#1 GreasySpot

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 07:23 AM

I currently have a netgear dual band wireless router(I'll have to check on model #) which serves a desktop and 2 laptops. Across the room I have an Xbox 360 and Sat box that I'd like online. My thought was to use a wireless router/switch in reverse to receive the wireless signal from the original router and have wired connections to the Xbox and Sat box.

I purchased a cheap Belkin N150 but have been unable to make it work. I also found that I have a netopia modem/wireless router/switch that I can use if the Belkin won't work.

I know enough about net configs to mess things up so any help would be nice and appreciated greatly.

Thank you,
Will

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#2 NpaMA

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 12:53 AM

If you don't mind me asking, why are you attempting to do this? I assume it's not a signal issue since the 2nd router has to be close to the Xbox to be plugged in directly.

This could be done with the right equipment, but really - I would not recommend it. Either run a CAT 5/6 cable to the second router or just use Wireless on the devices.

#3 GreasySpot

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:32 AM

The point of this is to connect them wirelessly because they don't have built in wireless capabilities.

#4 NpaMA

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 07:01 PM

You may be able to put something such as DD-WRT on the router and use advanced setting to configure this. I really doubt any consumer grade (below $100) routers will support this right out of the box.

Besides putting custom firmware on the router, the only other ways I think this can be done would be to:

A) Buy wireless adapaters for the devices. I know you can get it for the Xbox, not sure about the STB. If it's DirecTV STB, then I believe you should be able to get one for that aswell.

B ) Run a cable from Router 1 to Router 2 and then plug the devices into Router 2.

C) Flash the router with a custom firmware (although this isn't my strong point)

D) Go with some type of professional grade router that allows this.


I know they make wireless AP repeats, but I've never seen those working in reverse (converting wireless to CAT 5/6) just wireless to wireless and cable to wireless.

Maybe someone else can advise better, but that's the only way I see this working.

Edited by NpaMA, 10 April 2012 - 07:01 PM.


#5 GreasySpot

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:16 PM

Please don't take this the wrong way. I'm not trying to come off arrogant and an ass, but the suggestions you are giving me are not what I asked for. I have either found they don't work or I don't want to do it that way.

  • You suggest DD-WRT but my router is not on the approved hardware list.
  • You suggest wireless adapters for each device. This is a costly option I am not ready to entertain yet. Both pieces of hardware have rj-45 ports so wireless would have to be purchased for each and probably proprietary.
  • You suggest running a cable to the 2nd router. If I wanted to do this I would use a switch not a router. I wanted to stay away from cables if possible.

I know this can be done because a friend has it done at his house just with different routers. My probably is I can't figure out the proper ip addresses, DCHP settings, and other configs in the 2 routers to get them to communicate properly.

I know this will work I just need someone with more router configuration experience to guide me in the right direction.

Thank You,
Will

#6 NpaMA

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:42 PM

I had a Belkin N150 router in the past and it did not support this. That is why I kept pointing to the other possible solutions. If you have a Belkin N150 and it does support this, then I can help you with the IP information. I also googled and could not find any of the new Belkin N150s listing this as a feature...Go figure.

For IP information: Inside the router, you will want the Default Gateway as router 1's IP. For Belkin this is normally 192.168.2.1. Since you're sharing the same network, DHCP on router 2 should be turned off. The firewall on router 2 should be off aswell, which should turn the 2nd router into a wireless AP and switch, contacting the primary default gateway (first router) for IP information for each device that connects. Inside of the second router, set the LAN IP to something outside of your DHCP range. You can find it inside of your first (primary) router, but if you can't - it's normally safe to just add 30 to the last octet of the IP address assuming it does not go over 254.

I have experience in doing things similar to this, just not with cheaper-line routers (ex: Belkin Consumer).

#7 GreasySpot

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 05:52 AM

Thank you for the info. I tried the instructions you provided and it did not work. I will try it again and pay very close attention to the details but as you previously stated, it might just plain and simple not work in this case. I have a netopia modem/wireless router/switch that I will try using the same info plus turning off the modem part, if possible.

Thanks again,
Will

#8 GreasySpot

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 05:56 AM

Can DD-WRT be loaded even if it's not on the approved list? Maybe mine is newer than the list.

#9 NpaMA

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 05:06 PM

Can you get me the exact model number on the N150? "NXXX" is just a term router manufacturers use to market that it has "N" networking up to "150"mbps.

Check the bottom of the router for the actual model number.

#10 GreasySpot

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:53 AM

Belkin N150 Wireless Router
Model # F9K1001V4

#11 Fozzies

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 04:52 PM

I have achieved what you want in the past. its all down to the access point( you call it the router) and terminology. some can do it, others cant. terminology to look for in the setup pages of the AP include ad-hoc, bridge, client bridge.
We used a device called engenius for ethernet bridging across .5mile. the engenius website,at the time, offered excellent setup info relevant to other devices too. try googling it




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