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Determine amount of ram or system spec based on applications that a user wants to install question


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#1 Econstantine

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 01:26 PM

Hi,

There's this friend who was asking me as to how can I check if the programs he will install will not hog the resources of his pc..Well I don't have an idea about that...

He has this Dell Optiplex pc with 2gb ram and Pentium D processor formerly running XP but now has Windows 7 Basic installed. He has already installed MS Office 2010. Other software I see are Glary Utilities Pro, CCleaner, Imageburn, Foxit Viewer, Daemon Tools Lite, Malwarebytes free and Avast Free.

Now he is planning to install Adobe CS4 and some games like NBA games, Counterstrike, DOTA etc..Well I am not a gaming freak and my pc is a pure work pc. But I believe at that spec of a pc he has and not even a video card installed I think that pc will crawl...

How can I check if those applications will make the pc suffer or shall I say crawl...?

I seem to have read that it can be computed as to the amount of ram consumption based on the system requirements of an application versus the ram available of the pc but do not know how..I remember that Windows 7 consumes 1gb of ram in idle meaning doing nothing while it is on...yes?

I think that there has to be a way how to determine what he should have as amount of ram for that pc versus the summation of the system requirements of the applications that are installed and he wishes to add.

Can it be determined/computed or......? How..?

What may be a better explanation as to how can these applications that he wishes to install will make the pc slow? Slow because..how?

Can you guys help me out please...

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#2 Andrew

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 01:52 PM

Usually the system requirements for a game/application take the operating system's RAM/CPU/GPU/etc. use into account. This is why sometimes you'll see different system requirements for an application for different versions of the same operating system.

On a computer with 2GB of RAM and no discrete video card, modern games are going to perform badly on high graphics settings, and likely not much better on the medium settings. Low settings should be playable, but not very pretty. A decent graphics card will make a huge difference here.

#3 Econstantine

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:09 PM

@Andrew,

Thank you for the reply.

Usually the system requirements for a game/application take the operating system's RAM/CPU/GPU/etc. use into account. This is why sometimes you'll see different system requirements for an application for different versions of the same operating system.

-- Yes I agree there. How about those games installed alongside Adobe CS4 and other applications like MSOffice 2010 and of course the AV(no 3rd party firewall just the windows firewall)..? He will soon be switching to Fsecure or Eset whic has Parental Control functions for his kids. Have not used those long enough to gauge how it behaves on a work pc but in home pc which is (I believe..) going to be a gaming pc...hmmm..

#4 Andrew

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 03:58 PM

You probably shouldn't run high-end games and Photoshop at the same time ;)As for AV's and firewalls, I've found Avast Internet Security to be good protection without heavy resource use, though your mileage may vary. Eset is also very good, but I don't know how it will impact performance. The last time I used FSecure was in the 90's so I don't really know how their doing these days.




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