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Windows 7 Repair will not work


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10 replies to this topic

#1 provocateur

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 10:35 AM

Hi Guys,
My wife was fiddling on Facebook and her PC crashed. It boots to a repair message, but fails each time with an error about a corrupt registry.
I have tried all the "F8" options, but it keeps going to the same repair screen, which fails each time.
It has two HDDs, so I am busy (DOS) copying files from the C: drive to the D: drive, but I would rather repair than reinstall.
Any assistance will be highly appreciated.
Thanks
Barry Eslick

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#2 hworta

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 01:38 PM

I think if you re install over the old operating system it imports as much of the old system as possible with the same operating system.

#3 provocateur

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 02:26 PM

From the tutorial, I did the following:
This can be done using the following commands: (I added the "E" to the syntax, as the original C: drive is now E:)

Type REG LOAD HKLM\TempSoft E:\Windows\System32\config\software and press Enter to load the Registry hive.

Type regedit.exe and press Enter to start the Windows Registry Editor.

Browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\TempSoft\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon key within the Registry Editor.

Double-click on the Userinit value and change the data to read E:\Windows\system32\userinit.exe,

Exit the Windows Registry Editor.

Type REG UNLOAD HKLM\TempSoft and press Enter to unload the Registry hive.

Type exit and press Enter on your keyboard and then reboot your computer.

No luck....
The C: drive directory shows: System Reserved - with no files in the directory.

I have tried to repair by booting with the Win7 DVD, but the two options I have are install or upgrade, but upgrade requires the PC to start Windows normally and then upgrade from the DVD, but it will not start normally.
HELP, please...

#4 Artrooks

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 09:06 AM

Have you tried to access "system restore" after booting from your Windows 7 Installation DVD?

Here is a how to.
Arrow down and follow Option 2.
At the System Recovery Option Menu, choose "System Restore" and select a point in time before the crash.

Good luck.

Regards,
Brooks



 


#5 provocateur

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 06:01 PM

The recovery disk is unable to find any previous restore points. I am also not able to recover the disk as the recovery disk is unable to find the Win7 OS. Any other suggestions, please?

Using the recovery disk does suggest that the partition table is corrupt. Is there a tool that I can run from the command prompt to repair the partition table?

Edited by provocateur, 24 March 2012 - 06:03 PM.


#6 Artrooks

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 07:18 PM

Is there a tool that I can run from the command prompt to repair the partition table?

Not that I'm aware of.


If you could pull your wife's hard drive and slave it into another computer, you could try to run testdisk-6.13.win.zip (Windows NT4, 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, 2008, Windows 7 (x86 & x64).
See tutorial: TestDisk_Step_By_Step.

(Disclaimer: I have never used this but know people who it has helped.)

Regards,
Brooks



 


#7 provocateur

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 06:23 AM

Artrooks, thanks for the reply. The problem is that the TestDisk software "sees" the disk as OK, but there is a new primary partition named "System Reserved" and the secondary partition is the original primary partition.
I would like to have the new partition removed or merged with the secondary partition so that the disk reverts to its original bootable configuration. And I don't see that option with the software....

Edited by provocateur, 25 March 2012 - 06:49 AM.


#8 provocateur

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 06:29 AM

Here is the result screen. As can be seen the 1st partition is seen as primary bootable, whereas the original (now 2nd) partition is also seen as primary, although not bootable.
When I try to modify the 2nd partition to primary bootable, it shows an error as "Structure: Bad"

Attached Files


Edited by provocateur, 25 March 2012 - 06:59 AM.


#9 Artrooks

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 09:15 AM

The "System Reserved" partition is normally created during the installation of Windows 7. See: "System Reserved" questions. Arrow down to The_Prophecy.

For what it's worth, in "Disk Management," on my computer, Windows 7 partitions are as follows:
  • System Reserved, 100 MB, NTFS, Healthy (System, Active, Primary Partition).
  • Hard Drive (C:\), 167 GB NTFS, Healthy ( Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition).

Have you been able to retrieve all important data from this computer? If testdisk reads the partition, you may be able to use a linux based live CD to access data on the drive. I can give you specifics if you want.

Unfortunately, i'm not sure what to say regarding the TestDisk results.

Regards,
Brooks



 


#10 provocateur

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 09:24 AM

Hi and thanks again for the assistance. I am able to read the drive on my PC and I am in the process of copying all the available data to my 2nd HD.
I have tried all sorts of tools to try and recover the boot sector, but so far no luck.
The drive was one I installed originally, so the "System Reserved" should not be there. I may have to re-install Win7, but this will be if I have exhausted all alternatives.
With a previous problem, I was encouraged to reformat and re-install, but with the help of Bleeping Computer, I was able to recover my HD. And I have all the necessary safegaurds built into my PC. It is a pity I did not do the same for my wife's PC - which I will do once I have fixed it.

Your Thomas Huxley sig gives me hope.

Edited by provocateur, 25 March 2012 - 09:24 AM.


#11 Artrooks

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 10:19 AM

After all the data has been safely backed up, have a look here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927392 (Bootrec.exe tool).

The Windows 7 Installation DVD would still have to recognize the "Win 7 OS" in order to allow access to the "Command Prompt." If that's still an issue, then this won't work.

Maybe someone else out there has a better suggestion.

Regards,
Brooks



 





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