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Question about ram


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#1 zerepleoy

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:18 PM

I have 8 gigs of ram on my laptop (don't ask :P), and anyway... I've had to reformat this thing many times in the past, and at one point I was installing Windows XP (being tired of the errors given in 7). It worked awesomely, and I soon realized that I had accidentally installed the 32 bit version, which wasn't a big deal to me considering it worked fine. The only issue of course being that thing about 32 bit OS not making use of all available ram. All my previous reformattings were 64 bit, which made me think that my ram might possible be bad. Part of it anyway. I plan to run memory scan tests to check for sure, can't remember if I had actually done that in the past. Back on 64 bit Ultimate again now, seems ok.

But my question is... if RAM can go bad, (which i read can from heat or static?) then, is it possible that it can cause the issues I was dealing with. (Extreme system lag, screen freezing, programs crashing, all sorts of other annoying things). In my somewhere between experienced and Intermediate PC Hardware knowledge, I believe it can, and so... are there programs which can repair it? Or would a ram swap be the option? Perhaps a way to remove that portion of the ram from use virtually? Sorry if this was long :P

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#2 alexsmith2709

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:44 PM

Yes RAM can go bad. The best way to test for bad RAM is to run memtest.
If you do have bad RAM then you should swap it for a working stick. There isn't a software option to repair bad RAM.

#3 zerepleoy

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:53 PM

Yes RAM can go bad. The best way to test for bad RAM is to run memtest.
If you do have bad RAM then you should swap it for a working stick. There isn't a software option to repair bad RAM.


Right, thanks! Just needed some extra input. If anyone else has anything to say, feel free.

#4 rotor123

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:24 PM

Unfortunately it can go bad. I just started having problems on my workstation this year. Crashing with no rhyme or reason apparent. I resorted to pulling one of the memories and when that didn't do it I swapped the memories and problem went away. So now I'm running 1.75Gb rather than the 2Gb I had before. I had 2 x 1Gb memory and now 1 x 1Gb and 3 X 256Mb memory installed. They were all I had handy used.

Not the first memory I've seen go bad either.

Cheers
Roger

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#5 Baltboy

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:56 PM

Keep in mind that memtest is a great tool but it isn't perfect. I've seen it pass all tests even with bad ram. Best way is to swap out the pieces like Rotor did to find the culprit.

As a side note are all of the sticks identical models of the same speed, latency, ect? Even though the computer usually auto adjusts I have seen this cause issues before. You can try setting the memory parameters in the BIOS manually which often helps correct issues with dissimilar ram.
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#6 rotor123

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 09:58 AM

Hi, I'll agree with the memory test too. That computer I was talking about, A older IBM workstation, I ran a memory test. It came back ok. So I went on to popping in a spare SCSI drive and reloading. Same problem. It could run fine for a day or crash several times a day.

So, memory test passed for the memory, swapping out, one by one found the bad one. Replaced bad memory and rock solid.

Good Luck
Roger

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