Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Unusually large Master File Table?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 okiewild

okiewild

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:45 AM

Posted 17 March 2012 - 07:58 PM

Recently added a 2TB external USB drive for big files I rarely access. I'm using the Auslogics utility for defragmenting, and noticed something odd. A large portion of this new drive is occupied by the "Master File Table." (link to screen capture below; MFT is purple, normal files are green.) The percentage of space used by the MFT on my other drives is much smaller. Can anybody help me understand this? Anything that will reduce the table size?

Screen Capture

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 James Litten

James Litten

    Ԁǝǝ˥q


  • BC Advisor
  • 1,945 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:08:45 AM

Posted 17 March 2012 - 08:16 PM

Hi

This can happen if the drive had a lot of files on it previously that were deleted. That can cause the MFT to get a lot of holes in it in some cases. Was this a brand new drive or was it a full drive that you deleted all of the stuff on and then started putting files on it?

2TB can have a reserved MFT space of 250GB (12.5%). How big is it on your drive?

James

Edited by NeverSayDie, 17 March 2012 - 08:20 PM.


#3 okiewild

okiewild
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:45 AM

Posted 18 March 2012 - 12:40 AM

This was a brand-new empty drive from NewEgg. I don't know how to give you the exact percentage taken by the Master Table, because FileSize Tree doesn't recognize those as normal files. Alternate way to count?

#4 noknojon

noknojon

  • Banned
  • 10,871 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:45 PM

Posted 18 March 2012 - 04:39 PM

I'm using the Auslogics utility for defragmenting,

Is there a reason for using Auslogics, or you just like it ??
Is the Windows Defragger working OK, or is it just too slow for you ??

In Windows XP and in Windows Server 2003, the Windows defrag utility defrags the MFT.

A defrag operation on the MFT combines an MFT file into 1 and prevents it from being stored in multiple places that are not sequential on disk. In this class of operation, the MFT file is more sequential. However, it is exactly the size that the MFT file was before the defrag operation.

An MFT can be too big if a volume used to have lots of files that were deleted. The files that were deleted cause internal holes in the MFT. These holes are significant regions that are unused by files. It is impossible to reclaim this space. This is at least true on a live NTFS volume.

Using Piriform Defraggler and Showing MFT This shows the amount of MFT taken, or you can use almost any Defrag system to show this -




#5 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,970 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:11:45 PM

Posted 18 March 2012 - 07:39 PM

I also incline towards the possibility of a fragmented MFT to explain this. The feature listing for Auslogics defrag says it moves files out of the MFT reserved area, to help prevent the MFT from fragmenting further if it needs to be enlarged. That could mean that when the MFT is in more than one piece, Auslogics clears files out of the space between MFT fragments even if they aren't specifically in the reserved area. Checking the exact state of the MFT as suggested above will show if this is so.

Note that under the Windows API, the MFT is considered defragmented if it is in no more than two fragments, since under the API the starting position of the MFT cannot be moved.

So if the effect appears to be caused by the MFT being in two fragments, you'd need to use a third-party defrag utility that can fully defrag the MFT (and hence does not use the Windows API).

Other work-arounds could be to just use another defrag utility, or set Auslogics to defrag files only, not the entire drive layout. This is a workable option in any case, especially for a storage drive where the files being contiguous is more significant than their actual location on the drive. File-only defrag is even quicker too.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#6 okiewild

okiewild
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:45 AM

Posted 18 March 2012 - 10:04 PM

Wow; the info I get from this forum is amazing. The only reason I started using Auslogics was because it provides and option to schedule defragmentation. Using the Windows tool would mean relying on my occasionally spotty attention span. I've gotten distracted on big projects in the past and then come back to find a hard drive that was a mess.

#7 noknojon

noknojon

  • Banned
  • 10,871 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:11:45 PM

Posted 18 March 2012 - 10:27 PM

I started using Auslogics was because it provides and option to schedule defragmentation. Using the Windows tool would mean relying on my occasionally spotty attention span.
I've gotten distracted on big projects in the past and then come back to find a hard drive that was a mess.

All fair comments, and if it suits you then keep using Auslogics -
I would still hit the Windows built in defrag tool on the odd occasion, just to be sure it still works OK - (only my personal view) -

Windows 7 now has a built in timer to schedule defrags, but I don't think this can be done with XP built in -

Regards -

#8 shashanks

shashanks

  • Members
  • 73 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Delhi, India
  • Local time:07:15 PM

Posted 20 March 2012 - 02:24 PM


I started using Auslogics was because it provides and option to schedule defragmentation. Using the Windows tool would mean relying on my occasionally spotty attention span.
I've gotten distracted on big projects in the past and then come back to find a hard drive that was a mess.

All fair comments, and if it suits you then keep using Auslogics -
I would still hit the Windows built in defrag tool on the odd occasion, just to be sure it still works OK - (only my personal view) -

Windows 7 now has a built in timer to schedule defrags, but I don't think this can be done with XP built in -

Regards -


You can schedule daily/weekly/monthly schedule scan(s) on each one of your drive(s). Scheduling is not difficult and you can get away with that nagging manual checks every now and the. In fact, you can also schedule disk cleanup similarly.

Here is the microsoft article for your purusal: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555098. More than happy to help :)
At least my pencil never crashes!

Best,
SS




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users