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Grid Computing


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#1 Stealth Assassin

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 12:11 PM

hi there;

i dont know if im in the right forum but ill give it a shot:

im wondering how to connect some computers and consoles through a network in order to share processing power, ram and graphics. i understand this is part of grid computing bt i dont know how to do it or even where to begin.

hopefully the grid will be able to share processing tasks for software.

hardware:

windows 7 home premium: 2.6GHz amd athlonII x4, 4GB DDR2 RAM (possibly two other win 7 computers)(this is an acer x1301)
acer aspire 7520 laptop: amd athlon 64bit 1GB RAM dual booting win server 2003 enterprise and win xp pro
acer aspire 7520 laptop: amd athlon 64bit NO HDD
if possible for graphics: xbox 360 elite and 80GB ps3.

any help will be appreciated, thanks.

Edited by hamluis, 09 March 2012 - 12:17 PM.
Moved from Internal Hardware to Networking.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 12:16 PM

FWIW: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_computing

Google References

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#3 Baltboy

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 11:13 PM

Keep in mind most grid computing is set for a pre-programmed task like SETI or Folding@ Home. They do not simply "share" the load of a software program they break it into small chunks that get distrubuted. Standard software does not work that way it uses threads which must be run in sequence. The data they generate is used for each successive step in he thread till it is completed. To o two things at once requires a seperate thread using a seperate data stream (that is they cannot be working on data thatwould affect the other thread). Most software programs do not generate the number of threads needed to use more than one or two multi-core processors at best.

On the other hand if you are looking to set up a dedicated networked cluster "super computer" this can be done using several different Linux approaches. The general jist of it is that the computers are linked via gigabit connections at a minimum and share the data and load across the links. The down side is that the program you are running must be multi-threaded enough to leverage the hardware. Most of these clusters are being used at colleges and the like to model weather, explosions, and other highly complex multi faceted events.

There is one other solution out there that works for windows but it is a very limited setup. The only time I have seen it used is for someone running microsoft flight simulator on like 12 monitors at once. However this is a one trick pony kind of deal simce it doesn't really work for many things.
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#4 Baltboy

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 11:13 PM

Keep in mind most grid computing is set for a pre-programmed task like SETI or Folding@ Home. They do not simply "share" the load of a software program they break it into small chunks that get distrubuted. Standard software does not work that way it uses threads which must be run in sequence. The data they generate is used for each successive step in he thread till it is completed. To o two things at once requires a seperate thread using a seperate data stream (that is they cannot be working on data thatwould affect the other thread). Most software programs do not generate the number of threads needed to use more than one or two multi-core processors at best.

On the other hand if you are looking to set up a dedicated networked cluster "super computer" this can be done using several different Linux approaches. The general jist of it is that the computers are linked via gigabit connections at a minimum and share the data and load across the links. The down side is that the program you are running must be multi-threaded enough to leverage the hardware. Most of these clusters are being used at colleges and the like to model weather, explosions, and other highly complex multi faceted events.

There is one other solution out there that works for windows but it is a very limited setup. The only time I have seen it used is for someone running microsoft flight simulator on like 12 monitors at once. However this is a one trick pony kind of deal simce it doesn't really work for many things.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#5 Stealth Assassin

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:45 PM

hi Baltboy;

thanks for the reply, i do have a modified version of linux on a disk that can be booted. you mentioned using windows, how would this be done?

furthermore, is there any way of linking an xbox 360 or ps3 (purely for graphics). i have linked the xbox through my laptop on the LAN.

#6 Stealth Assassin

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:47 PM

do you use the linux cluster programs to create a home made "super computer"? i assume the operating systems on ALL coputers must be the same.

#7 Baltboy

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 09:35 PM

Here is a few articles to read. Search Google there is a ton of info. The first one has a windows cluster too. It can be found HERE. Also look up Beowulf. That is a very establish Linux variant. No all of the computers do not need to be the same. Using an xbox or ps3 would be out of the question. Besides even a middle of the road ho hum pc graphics card is far better that either of them.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
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#8 Stealth Assassin

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 02:21 PM

ill have a look. thanks for the research.




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