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Unmountable_boot_volume


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18 replies to this topic

#1 StEvE21

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 05:40 PM

windows XP pro edition, pentium 2

I just moved my computer from one room to another, and when I turned it on I got the UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME error. I read other posts about this problem, but everyone who had this problem said their computer either froze while using it, or they installed something new. I do not know why the computer thinks I installed something new, because it was just working until I moved it.
I don't have the XP CD, but I do have a XP home edition CD from a new CPU I just bought, but I don't want to use this if I dont have to, becase it only has a trial of microsoft office (which I need)
Any suggestions?

Edited by StEvE21, 17 February 2006 - 05:40 PM.


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#2 Enthusiast

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 05:46 PM

I wouldn't suggest using a XP Home cd on a computer that has an XP Pro installation.

Open the case and make sure all the connections to the hard drive are tight including the power cable.

#3 StEvE21

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 06:05 PM

I thought it was something like that, since I didn't install anything new. I will check now.
By the way, do you think it would do this if the printer is not hooked up and the software is installed? Maybe that is why it thinks something is wrong?

#4 Enthusiast

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 06:10 PM

The printer not being connected should not cause any problem unless you tried to print something, and then the error message would only say printer unavailable or something like that.

If the connections are all proper, and the hard drive hasn't gone bad, you probably have a problem that is going to require a Win XP Pro disk to repair it.

If you can borrow a XP Pro full installation disk and know your XP key number, you can use it to repair your installation of XP Pro.
If not, a computer repair shop will not charge all that much to reload the op system. - Again, you will need the key number.

See the following:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=297185

Edited by Enthusiast, 17 February 2006 - 06:20 PM.


#5 StEvE21

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 06:32 PM

I already saw that site, and I don't know what all that means.

• Your computer uses an Ultra Direct Memory Access (UDMA) hard disk controller, and the following conditions are true:
• You use a standard 40-wire connector cable to connect the UDMA drive to the controller instead of the required 80-wire, 40-pin cable.
• The basic input/output system (BIOS) settings are configured to force the faster UDMA modes.
• The file system is damaged and cannot be mounted.

No clue...

And what happens if I don't know the key number?

EDIT: the problem is
"• Your computer uses an Ultra Direct Memory Access (UDMA) hard disk controller, and the following conditions are true: • You use a standard 40-wire connector cable to connect the UDMA drive to the controller instead of the required 80-wire, 40-pin cable.
• The basic input/output system (BIOS) settings are configured to force the faster UDMA modes."

This is because it says "If the second parameter (0xbbbbbbbb) of the Stop error is 0xC0000032, then the file system is damaged" but it does not say 0xC0000032.

Edited by StEvE21, 17 February 2006 - 06:50 PM.


#6 Enthusiast

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 10:07 PM

What it says is if either of the following conditions is true:

This behavior can occur if either of the following conditions is true:
• Your computer uses an Ultra Direct Memory Access (UDMA) hard
• The file system is damaged and cannot be mounted.

Damaged File System
If the second parameter (0xbbbbbbbb) of the Stop error is 0xC0000032, then the file system is damaged.

If this is the case, restart the computer to the Recovery Console, and then use the chkdsk /r command to repair the volume. After you repair the volume, check your hardware to isolate the cause of the file system damage.

To do this, use the following steps:
1. Start your computer with the Windows startup disks, or with the Windows CD-ROM if your computer can start from the CD-ROM drive.

2. When the Welcome to Setup screen appears, press R to select the repair option.

3. If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot computer, select the Windows installation that you want to access from the Recovery Console.

4. Type the administrator password when you are prompted to do so.


NOTE: If no administrator password exists, press ENTER.

5. At the command prompt, on the drive where Windows is installed, type chkdsk /r, and then press ENTER.

6. At the command prompt, type exit, and then press ENTER to restart your computer.For additional information about how to use the Recovery Console in Windows XP, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:314058 http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314058/EN-US/

Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console
If this procedure does not work, repeat it and use the fixboot command in step 5 instead of the chkdsk /r command.

You will need the key number, either now or sometime in the future and even if you find the original XP Pro disk.
Were you the original owner of the computer? The key number should be on a certificate that came with the computer when it was new even if the computer manufacturer didn't provide an XP Pro disk.

What brand of computer is it (or did you assemble it yourself)?
Some brands (like HP, Sony and others) come with recovery partitions that can be accessed before Windows starts and can restore the computer to the same configuration it was in when new.

Edited by Enthusiast, 17 February 2006 - 10:13 PM.


#7 StEvE21

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 11:08 PM

We had the computer assembled about 8 years ago. It came with windows 98. On the win 98 book that came with it, it says "Certificate of Auhenticity" and "Product Key: P4CJQ-FG8F3-....." is that it, even if it has XP now? I used my cousins CD.

#8 Enthusiast

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 11:53 PM

Well, it would have been an upgrade or a new install of XP.

There should be a COA for that too with the product key.

#9 StEvE21

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 05:42 PM

OK I managed to get a XP Pro CD (finally, I know...) and its product key. Will this work, even if it is not the same CD (or product key) I used the first time?

If I cannot use this to fix the problem, I do not mind if I have to totally re-install XP. Can I do that with this CD?
Thanks.

Edited by StEvE21, 21 April 2006 - 05:43 PM.


#10 Enthusiast

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 06:35 PM

The product key is good for one and only one installation.
If it has been used on another computer it will not validate nor will it authenticate when you try to get necessary critical updates or other downloads from Microsoft, which you will absolutely need (if not now, then in the future).

In addition, if this license, the key number has been used when Win XP Pro was installed and activated on another computer, you will be pirating software - violating the Microsoft EULA, and if the system requires you to activate, which it will, it will fail activation and then shut down in 30 days.

When you moved the computer you probably jarred the hard drive or the IDE cables that attach it to the motherboard. Open the computer, make sure the connections are tight, and hope the computer boots.
Actually, if the hard drive has been in this computer for eight years you have gotten way more than its expected lifetime.

#11 ThorXP

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 08:13 PM

Take a look at this fix right from Microsoft

"STOP 0x000000ED UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME" Error Message When You Restart Your Computer or Upgrade to Windows XP

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=297185

This should solve the problem.

#12 ThorXP

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 08:21 PM

For the Windows XP Pro install cd you have the key code from it is not good for you to use under any circumstances. Microsoft is very squirrelly about that and has been known to show up with the FBI. Then did at a computer show several years ago.

If you need a key code for your computer you can get the one that is in the operating system. Use a program called Belarc found at this link:

http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html

Run the program and look for the Product Key and copy it down. You will be safe after that.

If you have service pack 2 installed and your install disk does not have service pack 2 on it you will have to follow the following link:

Build an XP-SP2 Recovery Disc = http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1747010,00.asp

Have a good day and stay safe.

#13 Enthusiast

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 09:16 AM

For the Windows XP Pro install cd you have the key code from it is not good for you to use under any circumstances. Microsoft is very squirrelly about that and has been known to show up with the FBI. Then did at a computer show several years ago.

If you need a key code for your computer you can get the one that is in the operating system. Use a program called Belarc found at this link:

http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html

Run the program and look for the Product Key and copy it down. You will be safe after that.

If you have service pack 2 installed and your install disk does not have service pack 2 on it you will have to follow the following link:

Build an XP-SP2 Recovery Disc = http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1747010,00.asp

Have a good day and stay safe.


That will only work if he can get his original drive operational again which in that case it will boot when the system is turned on. and if he does get it to boot than of course get the product key for the legitimate install with either Bellarc or version 1.51 of Everest.

Then he could reinstall Win XP with the disk he obtained and use the proper key to validate it on a new hard drive or, if the old drive worked long enough he could use the migration software from the new drive (or downloaded from support at the site of the new drive's manufacturer) to transfer the op system installation, all his programs and all data from the drive that is failing (as long as it holds up through the migration process) to the new drive.

Edited by Enthusiast, 22 April 2006 - 09:22 AM.


#14 ThorXP

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Posted 22 April 2006 - 09:52 AM

Yes I know that you have to have access to the hard drive but I was replying to the posts about the product keys. In my opinion I think he should switch drives around making the larger hard drive the new C: drive and temporarily leaving the old C: Drive which is now the new D: Drive out of the computer so it cannot be mistakenly accessed.

Do a new fresh install of Windows on the New Drive C: and when it is finished and working put the D: drive (The old C: Drive) back in and get his data from it and then format it and then use it.

This should solve the memberís problem. He still needs his key code. Take the present C: drive to another system and use belarc or Everest to get it.

#15 StEvE21

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 03:14 PM

:thumbsup: :flowers: :trumpet:
Wow, a lot of replies here... I just ran the chkdsk command and it worked after that. All I needed was a windows disk.
Appreciate all of the help, eveyone.
p.s: sorry if I made you spend too much time on the replies.

Edited by StEvE21, 23 April 2006 - 03:15 PM.





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