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help building a new pc


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#1 king duskwolf

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 07:10 PM

Ever sense i first got my dell 4600(i would have bought a better pc but its all i could afford between school) i have been slowly upgradeing it with new video cards and ram because i like gaming on my pc. Now i have what i think is the best stuff my old pc can handle and i think what i should do now is salvage the parts and buy a newer motherboard and use some of my parts and keep upgradeing heres a list of my parts
CPU: Intel® Pentium® 4 CPU 2.80GHz
Motherboard model: 0F4491 (can only hold 4 1 GB ram)
RAM: 2 256mb sticks, 2 1 GB sticks DDR Whole amount of memory: 2560 mb
Graphics card: ATI Radeon HD 4600 1 GB memory
Id like your opinion on what would be the best motherboard to upgrade my pc to and thanks for your input and if you need more info just ask.

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 07:26 PM

Unfortunately, the only thing in that build worth salvaging is the graphics card, if it is PCI Express, as everything is too old or incompatible with newer equipment. Before we get started suggesting parts, what games are you playing and what is your budget? Keep in mind, that replacing your motherboard isn't only replacing that part, but the CPU, RAM, and possibly the operating system.

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#3 king duskwolf

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 07:52 PM

Unfortunately, the only thing in that build worth salvaging is the graphics card, if it is PCI Express, as everything is too old or incompatible with newer equipment. Before we get started suggesting parts, what games are you playing and what is your budget? Keep in mind, that replacing your motherboard isn't only replacing that part, but the CPU, RAM, and possibly the operating system.

well i trying to play games like Tribes ascend and BF3, i am not looking for anything really powerful just something that wont lag or take a while to load things and looks moderately ok.Also i have a 1000 GB hard drive i want to keep. can you either suggest a pc i can put the parts i can keep into or a preferable a build of parts( i hear its cheaper and better to build)

#4 DJBPace07

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 07:01 PM

Games on a PC are scalable with quality, so you don't need a NASA supercomputer to play if you don't want to invest that amount of money. However, you do need something reasonably powerful. Those are fairly high-end games so you will need something somewhat good.

Case: You may be able to reuse your old Dell case, however, don't expect being able to run multiple graphics cards and high-end GPU's will be too large.

Motherboard: ASUS M5A97 AM3+ AMD 970 - This is a good motherboard that is compatible with AMD's AM3 and AM3+ CPU. It also has USB 3.0, SATA 6, and UEFI. If you are going to be using more than one graphics card, you may want one of AMD's 990FX based motherboards. $94

CPU: AMD FX-6100 Zambezi 3.3GHz - This is a good CPU for what you are doing. It isn't high-end, nor is it low-end, but it will last for a little while. If you want a higher-end CPU, I would suggest the AMD FX-8120 Zambezi 3.1GHz. Keep in mind that Windows 7 can use this CPU quite well, however, the scheduler doesn't utilize the FX CPU's to their full potential. Windows 8 is aware of the architecture and has anywhere from 2% to 10% of a performance increase over Windows 7 using FX CPU's. $150

Power Supply: CORSAIR Builder Series CX500 V2 500W - I highly doubt your Dell has a decent power supply. Assuming your Dell case is standard and allows for an off-the-shelf ATX power supply, this will work. $59

RAM: AMD Entertainment Edition 4GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 - This should be enough for you, if you're unsure, add another stick. $20

Graphics Card: XFX HD-687A-ZHFC Radeon HD 6870 1GB - This will work with those games quite well. You won't be able to do ultra quality, but you will be able to use high at least. $164

Operating System: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit OEM - Due to licensing restrictions, you cannot reuse your copy of Windows. The license defines your PC by its motherboard, so, new motherboard, new PC. The system builder/OEM versions of Windows cannot be moved to a new PC, however, full, boxed, retail versions can. You can either buy Windows 7 now, or use the Windows 8 Consumer Preview until Windows 8 comes out and buy it then. Remember, Windows 8 CP is still a beta so your experience may vary in quality. $100

Grand Total: $590 (Before taxes, rebates, and shipping)

You should be able to reuse your optical drive and possibly hard drive, though, I would suggest replacing your hard drive if it is five years old or more.

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