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How to choose an external hard drive


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#1 juvanya

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 05:28 PM

I am finally getting up off my rear to get an EHD to backup my stuff. I know based on a few peoples recommendations that newegg.com is the place to go, but looking at all the options there, I have absolutely no idea what to get. My brother awhile ago said he partitioned his EHD, so each of the two disks is a separate backup (ie dual backup). I like this idea and can probably afford it. In addition, I am probably going to be backing up a MacBook Pro, an old XP, and Linux at some point. Altho the XP data I might just move onto the Mac.

Thanks. :)

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#2 Budapest

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 05:35 PM

In my opinion there is no benefit to partitioning your drive to create two separate backups. As the two partitions are located on the same physical drive, if there is a problem with the drive it can affect both partitions. If you are really concerned about data security then purchase two drives.

Personally I use two separate drives and I keep the two drives in different locations (one at home and the other locked in a filing cabinet at the office).

I would recommend Seagate or Western Digital drives.
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#3 juvanya

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 05:41 PM

His EHD has two disks in the case so they can be partitioned like that.

And thanks that narrows it down a good bit.

Edited by juvanya, 27 February 2012 - 05:41 PM.


#4 Coach Steve

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 09:00 AM

Having owned a computer repair/upgrade/build business for the past 15 years, I've had a front row seat to the EHD arena et al. I have long been a diehard supporter of Western Digital drives due mainly to their reliability but also due to the commitment and dedication the company has made to constantly bettering their products as well as standing firmly behind them and acknowledging the instances where a failure of their product was responsible for issues incurred by the end user and going the extra mile to make things right with them. That's not to say the other major players in the hard drive game don't make quality, dependable products as well - they do.

That said, I would stay away from their "Green" drives right now. There is an increasing number of these "Ultra Energy Efficient" drives that are experiencing problems across the board from little hiccups to complete failure with no warning. And it isn't limited to any one particular size or platform either. USB 2 and 3. All sizes from 500 GB to 3 TB. Internal and external.

Beyond that, you really can't make a bad choice when selecting a drive - especially if it's sole duty is going to be that of a storage device. However, when arranging your list of mfrs. in order of best to worst, you will want to make sure Hitachi, Samsung, and Fujitsu are further down the list than WD, and Seagate.

Edited by Coach Steve, 28 February 2012 - 09:45 AM.


#5 rotor123

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 01:32 PM

Coach Steve, I've been seeing that the Green drives are more troublesome and am steering away from them.

From here
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/seagate-barracuda-desktop-hdd-hard-drives,13880.html
Seagate to Drop Barracuda XT, Green HDD Line
From November

The Green series will be discontinued in February of next year (2102) as the company said that its new Barracuda drives have a "nearly identical power-consumption profile as energy-efficient desktop drives," but delivers much better performance.


http://storageeffect.media.seagate.com/2011/11/storage-effect/why-seagate-said-goodbye-to-green-drives/
Why Seagate said goodbye to “green” drives

the value proposition for “green” drives just isn’t there anymore. If you consider the annual power savings for a “green” drive over a 7200 RPM desktop drive like Barracuda it was next to nothing. We’re talking a matter of 40 cents per year”


Moving on, I second WD and Seagate. Use two physical drives in separate cases. That way if the case goes bad You still have a working backup.

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#6 juvanya

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 12:01 AM

I went with Seagate. Thanks all :D




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