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Computer Slow on Restart


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#1 bclown90

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 02:59 AM

Hey guys,

My computer has been running very slowly lately after I restart it. On average after I restart, it takes noticeably longer to launch and run programs. If I leave it sitting on my desk running, somewhere between 12-36 hours after I restarted, it will run just fine. I defrag my drive regularly, and also run virus scans regularly with Malwarebytes and a few other tools. This has been a problem for a while and I've tried a lot of things to fix it with no luck, including registry defraggers / optimizers, cleaning temp files, CleanMem, and several other tools. I'd love some ideas for things to try, as this is extremely annoying. The Process Explorer log is attached, if there is anything else I need to post let me know.

Thanks,

eb

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#2 akoch

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:46 PM

Start -> Run -> MSConfig -> startup tab

Uncheck all the crap that doesn't need to be starting with your computer. -- My rule of thumb is: Disable everything but antivirus entries.

Not saying this is you, but a lot of users will download any program they can find to "speed" their computer up, and then they have it all running and hogging up memory.

I personally will not install anything past CCleaner, Malwarebytes, and Security Essentials.

I've also seen people hog up their systems with combinations like: Norton/Spybot/AdAware/Registry Mechanic/etc.... After removing norton/spybot usually their systems will run 100% faster, lol.

Good luck.

#3 bclown90

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 01:57 PM

Actually I've already gone through and cleared out a lot of the startup entries, and I've never had norton/spybot/etc installed. I have tried a few things to speed up my computer (a few of the free IObit utilities) but I mostly just use the defrag and optimize option.

The main thing I want to find out is why the computer is running slowly for 12 hours, and then without any change or input from me, suddenly starts running normally again.

#4 akoch

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 02:10 PM

If you've eliminated the possibility of having a trashed up windows install:

1. Possible hard drive failure
Symptoms
-Slow boot time, but then decently fast once its "loaded"
-Takes forever for a program or folder to open, but once its open it works quickly

2. Not enough RAM
Symptoms
-A lot of hard drive activity -- the light blinks a lot. Things seem to run better the more you use them, but if you load up something else and come back, it's really unresponsive. This is due to the computer running out of RAM, and compensating RAM with hard drive space (by design, actually). Unfortunately, hard drive memory is a lot slower than RAM, and running a computer like this can eventually cause early hard drive failure.

3. Bad RAM
Symptoms
-A lot of pure freeze-ups (warranting a cold restart)
-Inconsistency in periods of slowness (Example: Sometimes its fast, then it randomly will slow down or crash when user activity is not a variable)
-Blue screens of death
-Programs crashing randomly

#5 akoch

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 02:13 PM

I honestly would either clean up all the junk, or back up and restore before replacing hardware components.

It's blatantly obvious after a nice, fresh, mint, virgin copy of windows is installed whether its a hardware or software problem. If its still running like garbage after you install a fresh copy of windows (and after all your drivers are installed), then it's obvious that you're having some type of hardware issue.

#6 bclown90

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 02:31 PM

Okay, thanks for the insight. I've got 4GB of RAM, and I've never had any problem with it before, so I'm pretty sure the amount of RAM is not an issue. It is possible that I some of the RAM is bad, as I have had a few BSOD over the last few weeks, or times when it will completely freeze up. It is also possible that I'm having some type of disk failure, the hard drive is over 5 years old, and the symptoms seem to line up pretty well. I'll check it out when I get back from work tonight.

#7 bclown90

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:21 PM

Alright, I figured out what I think is the issue. My battery is totally dead (lasts for maybe 10 minutes not plugged in) and when the computer detects that the battery is not charging (battery and plug with a red X on it in the bottom right tray) my computer runs very slowly. However, if I unplug and plug in my power cable several times, every once in a while the red X will go away, and it will just show a normal battery. When it does this, the computer will run normally. It also seems that after a certain period of time plugged in, anywhere between 4-24 hours, it will switch over normally, even if the X was present before. Restarting my computer starts this process over again, hence the slowness following a restart.

Now my question is, is there a way to fix this without buying a new battery (the computer is old, and I will buy a new laptop in the next few months, so I'm not ready to invest money in a new battery right now). I'd really like a way to get around this, as removing and plugging in my power cable hoping for a random chance that it will work is extremely annoying, and sometimes doesn't work at all. Has anyone encountered anything like this before?

#8 LucheLibre

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 12:10 PM

Try taking the battery out and running it just off the AC adapter.

If it looks like I know what I'm doing, there's a pretty good chance the only reason for that is because
I once asked someone to run chkdsk /r and a BC Advisor smacked me in the back of the head.

~ LL ~


#9 bclown90

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 03:24 AM

Try taking the battery out and running it just off the AC adapter.


I tried that, but it still says the battery is damaged, even if there is no battery.

Also, I recently found that while showing the red x on the charging indicator always slows down my computer, sometimes even when it is showing a normal fully charged battery, the computer still runs incredibly slow. It will then randomly start running normally after a period of time. During these periods of slowness, it does not display any noticeable increase in RAM used, and my CPU usage still registers at under 25%.

Any ideas? Or should I just scrap it and reformat?




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