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Boot taking almost 9 Mins


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#1 k.campbell

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 05:53 PM

Hi all,

So, I've been having issues for at least 6 months with my computer, but they've been getting more on my nerves lately due to my being in college and constantly using my laptop for schoolwork. The problem is that my boot time has been outrageous. The issues associated with this are 1) computer being slow/laggy until boot has completely finished and 2) general disappoint in the machine (considering its specs). I've been tracking the boot speed with Soluto for a couple weeks now and the consensus is that boot takes 7 mins normally, with a long boot being 8+ mins, and a fast boot being 3 mins. My aim is to be able to boot in under 2 minutes (like it did when it was new...) ideally under 1 min but I'll settle for 2 mins.

So, my machine's specs are as follows:

OS: Windows 7 Professional x64
Laptop: Toshiba Satellite L670 Customized
Mfg part#: PSK3AU-055014
RAM: 8GB Dual-Channel DDR3
CPU: Intel i5 CPU M460@2.53GHz
Motherboard: Toshiba NALAA (CPU)
Storage: 488GB Toshiba MK5065GSX
Video Card: Intel HD Graphics (Integrated)
Sound Card: Intel Display Audio
Antivirus: avast! Antivirus
Firewall: Windows Firewall

I use CCleaner almost daily to get rid of extra files (in failing hopes that it might help)
I also used defraggler a couple days ago to completely defrag my hard drive (only 38% fragmentation though)

Basically I maintain my computer daily, every installation is scrutinized to ensure that only the essentials are installed. I always run CCleaner after an install to get rid of registry entries that are left behind. I uninstall every program that I don;t need any longer. I've even started to use portable apps to cut down on the number of installed programs on my PC. After I'm done posting this I will run CHKDSK in safe mode just for giggles, but I'm sure there's nothing wrong. I did a virus scan last night and that came up empty (barring a couple false positives that I know to be OK). I will edit this post as I come up with more stuff, but I think that's pretty much it for now. If you need anymore info let me know and I'll get it to ASAP. I am a college student so speedy responses aren't guaranteed.

Other things I've done to the machine include most of the tweaks on THIS page. Also I've disabled many startup processes included on THIS page. I've tried EVERYthing I could think of or dig up on the internet and none of it has worked thus far. It very well could be one of these so called performance tweaks that did this, but I have no idea. That's why I'm here. Any and all help is appreciated.

Thanks,
K.Campbell

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#2 Allan

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 06:02 PM

1) Ccleaner does absolutely nothing
2) When you say you run chkdsk, do you run chkdsk /r ? If not, simply running chkdsk also does nothing.
3) What is new or different since the last time everything worked properly (ie, new hw, new sw, virus, error, etc)?
4) How quickly does it boot to safe mode?
5) If it boots to safe mode quickly, do the following:
Open msconfig and on the General tab choose "selective startup" (uncheck all three items) and reboot. Does the problem still occur? If not, start adding items back to msconfig one or two at a time, rebooting after each change, until the problem reappears and you'll have identified the offending process. This is clearly a time consuming procedure, but it is the best way to determine if some process loading with the system is the cause of your problem.
After you've isolated the cause, do not use msconfig to permanently disable the process. Instead, if it is a service go to START - RUN and type: services.msc (then press enter) and disable the service OR, if it a program, you can download & run a simple app such as Mike Lin's Startup Control Panel (http://www.mlin.net/StartupCPL.shtml) to enable, disable, or otherwise manage startup programs.

#3 k.campbell

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 10:08 PM

1) Ccleaner does absolutely nothing
2) When you say you run chkdsk, do you run chkdsk /r ? If not, simply running chkdsk also does nothing.
3) What is new or different since the last time everything worked properly (ie, new hw, new sw, virus, error, etc)?
4) How quickly does it boot to safe mode?
5) If it boots to safe mode quickly, do the following:
Open msconfig and on the General tab choose "selective startup" (uncheck all three items) and reboot. Does the problem still occur? If not, start adding items back to msconfig one or two at a time, rebooting after each change, until the problem reappears and you'll have identified the offending process. This is clearly a time consuming procedure, but it is the best way to determine if some process loading with the system is the cause of your problem.
After you've isolated the cause, do not use msconfig to permanently disable the process. Instead, if it is a service go to START - RUN and type: services.msc (then press enter) and disable the service OR, if it a program, you can download & run a simple app such as Mike Lin's Startup Control Panel (http://www.mlin.net/StartupCPL.shtml) to enable, disable, or otherwise manage startup programs.


1) Ok, I always thought that CCleaner was helpful. What then does CCleaner do?
2)I ran regular chkdsk. I have run chkdsk /r since then, and it revealed no problems.
3)New things include: upgrade to 8GB RAM (from 4GB), all kinds of new software (mostly
games from steam), blackberry desktop software, BLU-Ray media player software. I've never
gotten a virus on this machine. No error messages that I can recall. And don't forget that
the last time this thing ran smoothly was a long time ago, I'm not really sure I even
remember when it started to slow down.
4)It boots to safe mode in about 2.5 mins
5)Before I do this, I forgot to mention that Soluto records the boot time for every
process that starts during the boot cycle. The processes that take the most time are:
avast! Free : 74 secs
System : 46 secs
SVChost Netserv : 20 secs
winexplorer : 17 secs
print spooler: 16 secs
svchost sysnet: 16 secs
all other processes (normally about 70) take less than 10 secs each

Before you come out and say that avast is the issue, I need to say that I've tried re-installing avast already. On top of that, the time it takes for avast to start up changes every boot. sometimes its <30 secs sometimes its >200 secs. It's never quite the same. Same goes for the system process, it varies also.
So, after seeing all that, is it still recommended to go thru the start up processes one by one to figure out which one is really causing issues?

Thank you for your quick response!
K.Campbell

#4 Allan

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:13 AM

Please remove the extra 4GB ram you installed and reboot. Let's either eliminate that as the problem or identify it as such.

#5 LucheLibre

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:04 AM

1) Ok, I always thought that CCleaner was helpful. What then does CCleaner do?


CCleaner is good for reclaiming disk space from unnecessary files, but that's not going to solve any problems unless the disk is near completely full. The registry cleaner, though, has no tangible benefit.

Edited by LucheLibre, 15 February 2012 - 10:04 AM.

If it looks like I know what I'm doing, there's a pretty good chance the only reason for that is because
I once asked someone to run chkdsk /r and a BC Advisor smacked me in the back of the head.

~ LL ~


#6 Allan

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:16 AM

Yes, sorry - I didn't respond to your questions. Ccleaner does nothing you can't do on your own. As LucheLibre said above, it will delete temp files, etc which is nice if you need space on your hd - but IMO there's no reason to use 3rd party sw for that. Still, it's essentially a benign app as long as you don't use the registry cleaner module (or ANY registry cleaner, for that matter).

#7 k.campbell

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 04:40 PM

Please remove the extra 4GB ram you installed and reboot. Let's either eliminate that as the problem or identify it as such.


I don't think I really need to do this since I know for sure that the machine was running cruddy since well before the RAM was installed ~ 5 days ago. If you would Like I can do this, but I think it's unnecessary.



CCleaner is good for reclaiming disk space from unnecessary files, but that's not going to solve any problems unless the disk is near completely full. The registry cleaner, though, has no tangible benefit.



Good to know. Thanks


Yes, sorry - I didn't respond to your questions. Ccleaner does nothing you can't do on your own. As LucheLibre said above, it will delete temp files, etc which is nice if you need space on your hd - but IMO there's no reason to use 3rd party sw for that. Still, it's essentially a benign app as long as you don't use the registry cleaner module (or ANY registry cleaner, for that matter).



Ok, so what's so bad about the registry cleaner then? Because I use the registry cleaner all the time. Especially after uninstalling or installing programs. It always catches stuff after installations.
Thanks for all the answers!
K.Campbell

Edited by k.campbell, 15 February 2012 - 04:40 PM.


#8 Allan

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 05:05 PM

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

  • Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

    The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.
  • Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.
  • Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.
  • Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.
  • The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".
Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.


Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

  • Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

    The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.
  • Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.
  • Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.
  • Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.
  • The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".
Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.



#9 LucheLibre

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 05:15 PM

I don't think I really need to do this since I know for sure that the machine was running cruddy since well before the RAM was installed ~ 5 days ago. If you would Like I can do this, but I think it's unnecessary.


When troubleshooting, you do the easiest and cheapest thing first based on the information given. Allan is doing just that. Please follow his direction.

If it looks like I know what I'm doing, there's a pretty good chance the only reason for that is because
I once asked someone to run chkdsk /r and a BC Advisor smacked me in the back of the head.

~ LL ~


#10 k.campbell

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 05:29 PM

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:



There's a mouthful! Thank you for all the info! I'll probably not use the registry cleaner anymore then.


When troubleshooting, you do the easiest and cheapest thing first based on the information given. Allan is doing just that. Please follow his direction.


Ok I'll report back after I've done this and rebooted a few times.

#11 k.campbell

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 12:03 AM

Ok, so I reinstalled my old 4GB RAM and booted a few times. It booted faster (about 2.5 mins) a few times, then windows went through an update. After the update my boot time skyrocketed to 8 mins. Then it went back down to about 4 mins. I then reinstalled the new 8GB RAM and booted a few times. It took about 3 mins each time and then again started to rise to about 5 mins each boot. It should be noted that I used Soluto to record all my boot times.
One thing I noticed about the shorter boot times was that the although the machine was done booting (according to Soluto) it still ran slow for another 2-3 mins. I would try to run firefox right after it was done booting and it would take awhile to even open, never mind do anything. I have no idea what the issue is at this point :wacko:

#12 Allan

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 08:22 AM

Try the selective startup please.

#13 Layback Bear

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 11:37 AM

I would suggest a something that is basic.
Start button/serch/msconfig/start up, the only thing I have checked is my security, keyboard and mouse. While you are in msconfig go into services check Hide all Microsoft Services. The only thing I have checked are security programs. Don't mess with Windows 7 services.
As has been posted many times before don't mess with the registry or use a program to do it. Unless your a fan of doing fresh installs.

Edited by Layback Bear, 16 February 2012 - 11:41 AM.


#14 Allan

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 12:10 PM

I would suggest a something that is basic.
Start button/serch/msconfig/start up, the only thing I have checked is my security, keyboard and mouse. While you are in msconfig go into services check Hide all Microsoft Services. The only thing I have checked are security programs. Don't mess with Windows 7 services.
As has been posted many times before don't mess with the registry or use a program to do it. Unless your a fan of doing fresh installs.

I've just suggested a selective startup following my instructions above.

#15 k.campbell

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 11:10 PM

I've just suggested a selective startup following my instructions above.


After I did the selective startup, boot time didn't decrease by much, maybe a minute or two from 5 mins. Then I saw that avast was still running in the boot. And soluto showed avast was taking about 2 minutes to completely load every time. I ended up having to uninstall avast because it wouldn't allow me to stop the process.

After uninstalling avast, boot time dramatically decreased to a max of 1.5 minutes. Then I turned on normal startup (so as to see how much time my computer should take to boot) and my boot time went up by about a minute. I plan on going through the startup items one by one and seeing if they should be kept or not. I'll probably use the startup list on this website to determine which ones i keep.

Now, I'm not sure what to do about avast though. I can't reinstall it since it's just going to load down my boot time. Maybe a different antivirus? But that still leaves the question of why did avast take so long to boot? Any suggestions?




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