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Auto Restart on boot


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9 replies to this topic

#1 anathema3192

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 08:20 PM

Every time I turn on my computer the moment it goes to the load screen it restarts and tries to load again. I went into the BIOS and disabled auto restart on failure and got a BSOD. I restored it to its factory settings and nothing. I believe the cause of this was I attempted to change my hardware around by adding a gig of ram and changing the video card. I did this on an XPS 420. I put the default card and ram back and I still can not do anything. I can't boot into safe mode either.

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#2 jhayz

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 03:30 AM

I put the default card and ram back and I still can not do anything

Are there any instance that you might have upgraded hardware due to bad or faulty components on the once replaced now? Do you remember the BSOD error shown?
Please check from here on addressing RAM stick replacementprocedure. Try using also another same power supply unit.

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#3 anathema3192

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 02:10 PM

I put the default card and ram back and I still can not do anything

Are there any instance that you might have upgraded hardware due to bad or faulty components on the once replaced now? Do you remember the BSOD error shown?
Please check from here on addressing RAM stick replacementprocedure. Try using also another same power supply unit.

None of the hardware was faulty. It worked perfect before I put the new gfx card and put in the ram. When I tried booting with the hardware no BSOD was shown. After I went into the BIOS and disabled auto reboot on failure I saw I was getting a BSOD at the time it attempts to boot. I tried putting the the old ram sticks and the old gfx card back and the problem was still occurring. At its default machine specs I tried doing a system restore but I get a BSOD. I tried setting it back to its factory settings but it still does not boot.

#4 Artrooks

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 04:14 PM

  • With the old hardware installed, have you tried "Last Known Good Configuration"?
  • Did you uninstall your old video card drivers before installing the new card?
  • It might be helpful to take a look at the blue screen message. If you can, include the information outlined in red.
Posted Image


You could also run "Dell Diagnostics" by pressing <F12> when you see the Dell logo at system startup. Dell Diagnostic Main Menu.

Edited by Artrooks, 12 February 2012 - 04:51 PM.

Regards,
Brooks



 


#5 anathema3192

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 08:12 PM

I tried restoring to factory settings, nothing. I ran diagnostics on everything and nothing. I could not install the new gfx card software because when I started the computer after the first time I put it in the problem started occurring. No cords are loose either. Last known good config did not work either.
Sorry the pic is bad, I can take another if needed.
Posted Image

Edited by anathema3192, 16 February 2012 - 08:27 PM.


#6 Artrooks

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 10:18 PM

Are we seeing a blue screen with your "old" hardware setup? I would temporarily revert back to your original hardware if you haven't already done so.

With your original hardware in place, you could try a "system restore" to a date before the BSOD.
  • Turn on the computer.
  • When the Dell logo appears, press <F8> several times to access the Vista Advanced Boot Options Window.
  • Select "Repair Your Computer."
  • The System Recovery Options window appears. Select a keyboard layout and click Next.
  • To access the recovery options, log on as a local user. Look for the "System Restore" option and try to restore to a date before you installed the new hardware.
Note: You do NOT want to select the Dell Factory Image Restore as this will wipe your hard drive and return your system to factory setup.

The 0x0000007B Error is often a driver issue but there can be other causes: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/findbyerrormessage/a/stop0x0000007b.htm

Regards,
Brooks



 


#7 anathema3192

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 10:42 PM

Are we seeing a blue screen with your "old" hardware setup? I would temporarily revert back to your original hardware if you haven't already done so.

With your original hardware in place, you could try a "system restore" to a date before the BSOD.

  • Turn on the computer.
  • When the Dell logo appears, press <F8> several times to access the Vista Advanced Boot Options Window.
  • Select "Repair Your Computer."
  • The System Recovery Options window appears. Select a keyboard layout and click Next.
  • To access the recovery options, log on as a local user. Look for the "System Restore" option and try to restore to a date before you installed the new hardware.
Note: You do NOT want to select the Dell Factory Image Restore as this will wipe your hard drive and return your system to factory setup.

The 0x0000007B Error is often a driver issue but there can be other causes: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/findbyerrormessage/a/stop0x0000007b.htm

I put it back its original settings the day of the issue. After that I looked for a system restore but there was none listed for some reason. (Absurd because I make sure I back it up.) I already tried what you suggested before you suggested it, and I still got nothing. I will try some of the other options in that link and post back later.

EDIT: Nothing worked.

Edited by anathema3192, 17 February 2012 - 12:46 AM.


#8 Artrooks

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 09:38 AM

Going the route of "Repair my Computer" have you attempted to run chkdsk /r from the "Command Prompt"? (note the "space" after chkdsk).
Chkdsk will run through 5 stages and my take several hours. It should not be stopped.

Regarding "System Restore," when it shows the recent backup points, there is a box to check to show older points. Did you check that box and look for additional points?

Edited by Artrooks, 17 February 2012 - 09:42 AM.

Regards,
Brooks



 


#9 anathema3192

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:46 PM

Yes, I tried chkdsk /f as well as chkdsk /r and it says the system volume is being used by another process, to do it on next restart say yes or no.
I said yes, but on restart nothing happens. And System Restore just says "You do not have any system restore points, click here do make one" I clicked and it said "you can not set up points in the current mode."

#10 Artrooks

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 09:12 PM

The following procedure will run "chkdsk /f" if you're system will run the linux based boot disk. It might be worth a try.

On a computer with internet access and a CD burner, download "NTBR_CD.exe" by noahdfear.
  • Double click on the executable to extract the files. Open the "NTBR_CD" folder and double click "BurnItCD."
  • Insert a blank CD disk and click "Start" to create the bootable CD.
  • Boot the ailing computer with the NTBR_CD. Press <Enter> at the prompt, then "Press any key to continue."
  • Press <Enter> for default keyboard. You should now be at the Tool options screen.
  • Type 5 and press <ENTER> to go to a command prompt. Type: tools\ntfs4dos\chkdsk, then press <ENTER>.
  • You will be prompted (in German) to press Enter. Press <ENTER> to start the check disk utility.
  • Check Disk will check all attached drives and attempt to correct any errors. Please make a note of any errors found or corrections made.
  • When it completes type "menu" and press <ENTER> to return to the tools menu.
  • Type 6 and press <ENTER> to quit, then Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart.

Regards,
Brooks



 





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